A McClatchy report supposedly revealing that signals from Michael Cohen's cell phone had been detected near Prague during the summer of 2016 fell apart when a skeptical Joy Reid questioned one of the story's reporters.



Someone is finally crying foul over an evidence-free fake-news effort pushed by the same people who have promoted the Steele dossier for over a year. This time, the targets are the NRA and President Trump's 2016 victorious presidential campaign. In a Thursday Wall Street Journal column and a Friday Fox News appearance, Kimberley Strassel decried how the press has turned "the most outlandish accusation into 'news'" based only on "the whispers of a couple of Democratic lawmakers" and "an anonymous reference to the FBI."



Timothy Egan at the New York Times is so enamored of the mythology surrounding Barack Obama that he claimed in a Friday column that the 44th President's rhetoric "was the best American music" which "celebrated" a United States where, in Egan's words, "people from all races, ideologies and religious sects would check their hatreds at the door after becoming citizens." He pretended that the nation's current identity-driven divisions are all due to current President Donald Trump.



In a late Friday post, the McClatchy news service freaked out over the revelation that Republicans and right-of-center strategists are gunning to make the 2018 midterm elections a referendum on liberal media bias, contrasted with the strategy of liberals and their media allies to focus on President Trump.



On Friday at CNN, a clearly upset Don Lemon, covering a topic that almost no one in the press cared about for eight years during the Obama administration, abruptly ended a segment about the costs of protecting President Donald Trump and the First Family, and began to walk away from the set before the next commercial break began. Why? One of his panelists called the obsession with these costs "fake news." The panelist who set Lemon off, Paris Dennard, who describes himself as "a GOP political commentator and consultant," got Lemon's goat when he stood his ground despite pressure from Lemon and ridicule from two of the other three panelists.



On CNN Newsroom Monday, host Brianna Keilar claimed that she covered an incident or incidents involving Tea Party "people" (plural) who spit on members of Congress and hurled racial slang terms at African-American members of Congress.

In the Tea Party's seven-plus years of national presence, there is only one known event involving two separate incidents when what Keilar referred to could conceivably have occurred. Despite what Keilar claims took place, and despite the presence of hundreds of fellow protesters and dozens of phone and other cameras at the incidents, no one has ever proven that anyone deliberately spat on a member of Congress, nor has anyone proven that racial epithets or slang terms were hurled. The available evidence indicates that these things never happened.



At Monday night's presidential debate, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton made a big deal of how Republican nominee Donald Trump supposedly treated Alicia Machado after the 1996 Miss Universe winner gained a significant amount of weight during the year she held the title. Mrs. Clinton alleged that Trump called her "Miss Piggy" and "Miss Housekeeping." Trump denies it, and I could find no news account from that time showing that he used either nickname publicly.

Especially since the Clinton campaign is now actively using Machado to promote Mrs. Clinton's candidacy, even including her "story" in commercials, it's fair game to consider far heftier matters relating to Machado's history. The, uh, weight of the evidence leads one to seriously question, as the media won't, Team Clinton's judgment in associating so closely with Ms. Machado.



As Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine appeared on five Sunday talk shows, only CNN's Jake Tapper brought up Friday's reports that longtime Hillary Clinton friend and advisor Sidney Blumenthal tried to push anti-Obama birtherism into the media during the 2008 presidential campaign by pitching it to McClatchy's then-Washington bureau chief. The other Sunday talk shows failed to bring up the story even though Kaine in most of his appearances complained about birtherism, at several points calling it "bigoted."



For much of Friday evening, CNN viewers could witness various on-air personalities of the news network put in the awkward position of trying to repeatedly argue that the Hillary Clinton campaign of 2008 had nothing to do with promoting anti-Obama birther conspiracy theories, even while news was breaking that accused close Clinton confidant and advisor Sidney Blumenthal of personally trying to push birtherism into the media during Clinton's campaign against Barack Obama in 2008.



Friday night, yours truly detailed the latest evidence demonstrating that the Hillary Clinton campaign and a close confidant of Mrs. Clinton herself were involved in early 2008 in spreading the “birther” rumors, i.e., that then-Illinois Senator Barack Obama was not born in the U.S. Despite this news and other longstanding items, the Associated Press and others still insist that there is "no evidence" that Mrs. Clinton was connected with the rumors' initiation.

Concerning the Clinton confidant, former McClatchy Washington Bureau chief James Asher tweeted early Friday morning that Sidney Blumenthal “spread the Obama birther rumor to me in 2008, asking us to investigate.” What he didn’t say is that Blumenthal’s urgings actually caused McClatchy to investigate the matter, even sending reporter(s) to Kenya, where Blumenthal had “told me (Asher) in person Obama (was) born."



In a column that showcases the leftist belief that the ends justify the means, the Charlotte Observer and its parent company McClatchy have expressed nothing short of support for the economic boycotts of North Carolina in light of Republicans remaining defiant after Governor Pat McCrory signed a bathroom bill to ensure that people use the bathroom according to the gender they were born with.



The media is attempting to ethnically vitiate Sen. Ted Cruz across multiple platforms and in different languages.