This category contains postings about the largest newspapers in America. For other papers, look under "Regional News" for each state.

Since early April, the New York Times has presented a weekly "Red Century" series of op-eds dedicated to "Exploring the history and legacy of Communism, 100 years after the Russian Revolution" in 1917. The competition for the worst "communism wasn't all that bad" entry was pretty close until Saturday (seen in Sunday's print edition), when Kristen R. Ghodsee, a University of Pennsylvania professor of Russian and East European studies, told readers that "Women Had Better Sex Under Socialism," and deigned to tell us why.


The national press could barely hide its glee in June 2016 when Philadelphia passed a "soda tax" of 1.5 cents per ounce levied against non-alcoholic beverages containing "any form of artificial sugar substitute, including stevia, aspartame, sucralose, neotame, acesulfame potassium (Ace-K), saccharin, and advantame." Now that the predictions of opponents have virtually all come to pass, accompanied by unintended consequences even they didn't anticipate, the national press is barely interested.


On Tuesday morning, the Associated Press left no doubt that it does not want to see detailed news of the outrageous United Auto Workers-Fiat Chrysler training scandal spread beyond Metro Detroit. In an unbylined item which digested far longer reports seen at Detroit's major newspapers down to five paragraphs, the wire service kept the union out of its headline, failed to mention the union until the fourth paragraph, and omitted almost all of the details which caused a Chrysler financial analyst to plead guilty to his role in the conspiracy.


On Friday, in an op-ed which made the paper's print edition, David Brooks, the alleged conservative commentator at the New York Times, surprised more than a few people by calling for Google CEO Sundar Pichai to resign over his awful handling of now ex-employee James Damore's "Echo Chamber" document. Brooks identified the five key players in the drama, and directed sharp criticism at three of them: Google's diversity officer, the press, and ultimately Pichai.


Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank's vicious, mean-spirited attacks on Donald Trump, Republicans, and conservatives have become so predictable and trite that they're barely worthy of attention, no matter how shrill his rhetoric. The unhinged Milbank is of course entitled to his opinions, but in his latest column on Friday, he tried to promote an obvious falsehood as an indisputable fact, claiming in his column's headline that "There’s no such thing as a Trump Democrat."


Bari Weiss is a staff editor in the opinion section at the New York Times. Like many women, she was initially enthused by the Women's March movement which began after President Donald Trump's inauguration. Since then she has, for many good reasons, become disillusioned. She detailed that disillusionment in a Tuesday op-ed which clearly runs against the grain at the Times, and received predictable, name-calling blowback from a Women's March leader who pretended that they and their movement are non-violent. It isn't, and they aren't.


The Washington Post published Sunday about going on a tour backed by the US-designated terrorist group Hezbollah. With no counterbalance to the propaganda-laced piece, titled "Hezbollah takes journalists in Lebanon on a tour to prove Trump wrong," the article was anything but news.


The establishment press and the left began to build a template after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the U.S. Their argument, which eventually gained traction with protest movements during the Iraq War, claimed that any serious attempt to kill, imprison, expel, or otherwise punish terrorists would only help the enemy recruit more terrorists. A CNN reporter and an opinion writer are now claiming that an equivalent of this bogus argument should apply to the attempt to rid the nation of the scourge of the MS-13 gang.


The first news reports of House IT staffer Imran Awan's Monday arrest "for attempting to flee the country and (being) charged with bank fraud" came out on Tuesday night. The New York Times did not file a related story until Friday afternoon, roughly 72 hours later, for Saturday's print edition. Reporter Nicholas Fandos's Page A18 item is one of the most obvious and disgraceful attempts at misdirection and reality avoidance one will ever see, starting with its headline, which, incredibly, makes it appear as if this scandal, which the Democratic Party entirely owns, involves President Donald Trump.


On Wednesday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders read a letter from a Stockton, California boy named Dylan Harbin, whose nickname is "Pickle." Almost immediately, "Pickle Truthers" in the Trump-deranged media who couldn't imagine that a 9 year-old could really have written such a letter embarked on an exhaustive boyhunt to verify Pickle's existence.


When the establishment press isn't criticizing center-right outlets as fact-challenged and not objective, it's dismissing them as irrelevant and unimportant. If that's really the case, that would lead one to wonder why a seasoned New York Times reporter was bothering to look at a story published at Breitbart.com, let alone tweeting his breathtaking ignorance about the content of that report's first two sentences.


Last September, as I noted in a NewsBusters post, the Washington Post published a column by feminist freelancer Jody Allard, who used her perch to publicly shame her sons, lamenting how they were "blind to rape culture." Last week, facing criticism for continuing to expose her parent-child struggles and her sons' apparently unacceptable worldviews, she went to Medium.com to explain why she's not letting up. Those who continue to carry her columns need to be asked how they can justify continuing to enable her.