Over the past few days, CNN and MSNBC have again been peddling a discredited poll finding that about 90 percent of Americans -- this time from Quinnipiac with a tally of 97 percent -- supporting the adoption of laws to require background checks for all gun purchases. But, as previously documented by NewsBusters, other polling has found that support from respondents plummets if the questioner reminds or informs them that the overwhelming majority of gun purchases already undergo a background check since it is already required for licensed dealers.



The Associated Press has both given short shrift to and significantly whitewashed a frightening, violent threat made against President Donald Trump by a Democratic state representative from South Portland, Maine. On Tuesday, Scott Hamann, in a long Facebook rant, wrote, among other things, that "Trump is a half term president, at most, especially if I ever get within 10 feet of that p***y.”



Aaron Hanlon thinks anti-conservative bias at colleges and universities is a molehill that a lot of people try to make into a mountain. To the dismay of Hanlon, a professor of English at Colby College, some of his fellow liberals are among those who, in his opinion, exaggerate the problem and thereby bolster the right’s case. Last Thursday in The New Republic, Hanlon went after New York Times pundit Nicholas Kristof for three 2016 columns critical of the leftward lean of America’s campuses.



Yesterday was supposed to be a glorious day for the people involved in organizing something they called the "Million Student March."

On Monday, they had priceless free publicity provided by leftist luminaries at the Huffington Post. They had a new source of support and participation from the "Black Liberation Collective." They had four platforms students could supposedly believe in and get behind. They had reasonably nice weather in much of the country. According to the Daily Caller, with all these positive factors working in their favor, the perhaps "hundreds" of rallies involved typically drew ... uh ... well, between 10 and two dozen people. Most establishment press outlets have saved the poor kids the embarrassment of exposure; but one pair of especially gullible TV stations in Maine played along, and thoroughly beclowned themselves.



NPR Fresh Air host Terry Gross is a very passionate advocate of the “LGBT” agenda, and it came through again with a 37-minute interview promoting Washington Post reporter Amy Ellis Nutt and her book on  transgender female “Nicole” Maines. The title is Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family.

Nutt strongly pushed that the Maines family were wonderfully warm and thoughtful people – besieged at times by hateful people who cause bathroom wars:



A week ago (late on a Friday afternoon, naturally), the Obama administration released food stamp enrollment figures for July. Despite millions of Americans finding work during the past several years, the data continued a national trend of little to no meaningful decline in enrollment.

Seasonally adjusted Household Survey employment is now 148.8 million, slightly above its prerecession November 2007 peak of 146.6 million. Meanwhile, current food stamp enrollment, at 45.5 million, is far greater than the 2007 average of 26.2 million. There is a small exception to this disturbing situation. It's in Maine, where enrollment has declined by over 20 percent since 2009. Those wondering why didn't find anything resembling a complete answer in a brief Associated Press report Tuesday (presented in full because of its brevity and for fair use and discussion purposes):



"Maine's governor traps Kaci Hickox," insists editors of the Daily Beast.



Guest hosts of the NPR-distributed Diane Rehm Show announced on Thursday and Friday that "Diane is in Maine on a station visit." But that description to the public was incomplete. In fact, Rehm went to Portland, Maine as a keynote speaker on Friday to the fall conference of the local environmental group Maine Businesses for Sustainability. "Diane Rehm will discuss the ways in which sustainability and sustainable concepts have infiltrated current events, touching on her personal observations of sustainability trends in the media."

Rehm isn't exactly an environmental scientist, but online, it's suggested she charges $7,000 to $20,000 and a first-class plane ticket for a keynote speech.



According to the Washington Post, examining every detail of the relationship between moderate Republican Senators Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins is worth devoting an exhausting 6228 words to. Writer Martha Sherrill offered a fawning analysis of the two senators who often frustrate conservatives.

The near book-length profile investigated the apparent dislike the senators have for each other, but also highlighted the "nuanced" way in which the two side with liberal policies. "But voting with the Democrats has never fazed Snowe, especially after weeks of rumination," readers learn.

Regarding Snowe's decision to vote for acquitting Bill Clinton during impeachment, Sherrill narrated, "This nuanced decision making and openness to Democratic initiatives has fueled a tea party Web site called 'Mainers for Snowe Removal,' which displays a photograph of the smiling senator with her head being scooped up by a giant snow shovel."



ABC anchor Diane Sawyer, who in February demanded to know who will “keep insurance companies from jacking up premiums while making huge profits?”, on Friday found her champion in the Superintendent of Maine’s Bureau of Insurance, hailing Mila Kofman as a “super-cop” and a “gladiator” for rejecting a rate hike requested by Anthem Blue Cross.

Kofman proclaimed “we are the super-cops on the street. I take that responsibility as an insurance regulator very seriously,” a self-promotional description Sawyer adopted in her introduction, touting “a woman in Maine who is acting as a super-cop, and telling the insurance companies ‘no.’”

Reporter Bill Weir recounted how Kofman turned down an 18 percent increase in premiums for individual policies, allowing “11 percent. Enough for Anthem to cover their rising costs, but not enough to make a profit. She says they're doing just fine.” Presuming nefarious motives by insurance companies, Weir asserted the new health care law “depends on state regulators to keep them honest every day.”


[Update: HRC statement added below.

The censorious intolerance of the gay left is on display again – a reporter was fired in Waterville, Maine. His offense? Sending an angry private e-mail to the Human Rights Campaign in Washington. The HRC wanted the reporter dismissed – and bang, he was terminated.



Reporters at the Associated Press are clearly unhappy that Maine voters turned out to refuse to honor "gay marriage" at the ballot box.