On Thursday, a federal court judge in New York made what Eriq Gardner at the Hollywood Reporter called an "unusual move" in Sarah Palin's libel lawsuit against the New York Times. It is indeed extraordinarily unusual, and would appear not to bode well for the Times — which likely explains why the paper's colleagues in the establishment press are, for the most part, either not reporting it at all or inadequately reporting it.


Former Bush administration official, former failed McCain campaign aide, and current MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace was featured in Sunday’s New York Times Magazine in which she promoted her liberal tilt compared to other Republicans and complained that “there’s no other news” besides President Trump. 


The disgraced Keith Olbermann continues to spew his incoherent ramblings on the platform GQ gives him. In an episode of the Resistance with Keith Olbermann titled "The Media Must Fight Back," posted on July 20, he declared CNN should dox the guy who posted the wrestling GIF of  Trump beating CNN and that "War has been declared on the values of this country by the man in charge of this country."


Diane Stopyra attacked the new phenomenon of gender-reveal parties for pregnant women in a Sunday item for Cosmopolitan. Stopyra contended that such celebrations are "potentially damaging to said tiny humans," and that they exclude "a cross-section of the population out, adding to a culture of trans and intersex shame." The feminist writer also took aim at baby showers in general, and claimed, "We'd be better off showing the little girls in attendance that changing the world is every bit as much a female prerogative as bedazzling onesies."


At the Aspen Ideas Festival, liberal journalists maintained their high level of panic over President Trump’s “war on the press.” Jeffrey Goldberg is editor of The Atlantic magazine, a man who made sure his magazine abandoned its traditions to endorse Hillary Clinton for president. Now that his candidate failed, he claimed Trump’s criticisms of the press are going to lead to violence against journalists “in a large way.” 


The controversy over Kathy Griffin holding up a bloodied severed head of Donald Trump — an action which has led to her removal from CNN's New Year's Eve programming — reportedly spilled into the President's family when TMZ reported that the Trumps' 11-year son "Barron was in front of the TV watching a show when the news came on and he saw the bloody, beheaded image." TMZ says: "We're told he panicked and screamed, 'Mommy, Mommy!'"


The Associated Press, PolitiFact, CNN, Snopes and all of the other "fact-checkers" should be busy this weekend and well into next week vetting the howlers contained in Rebecca Traister's New York Magazine Friday afternoon interview of a politician who has been in the public eye for decades. But it's a virtual lock that they won't bother, because the person Traister interviewed was Hillary Clinton.


At NBC and Newsweek, it's still the late-1960s. The movie Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?, with its then-edgy portrayal of an engaged interracial couple visiting the white fiancee's parents, has recently debuted. Apparently the ink hasn't yet dried on the Supreme Court's Loving vs. Virginia decision, which nullified all remaining interracial marriage bans. What else can possibly explain the breathtakingly ignorant tweets emanating from those two media outlets acting as if America might not be ready for the idea that Rachel Lindsay, the first black woman in the history of The Bachelorette, might end up getting engaged to someone of another race?


After a turbulent week in American politics where controversial stories about President Trump’s administration were broken by newspapers with long-standing histories bias, NBC spent some time on Sunday Today championing a relative newcomer to “the game.” “But this national moment has brought some new players into the game as well,” touted host Willie Geist. “NBC's Katy Tur shines our Sunday spotlight on a publication you never would have associated with politics until now.” That newcomer is fashion magazine Teen Vogue


Time Magazine's May 29 cover features a purported parody of the U.S. White House turning red and well towards being transformed into what the illustrator believes is "the Kremlin." This is supposed to show just how creative and conscientious these folks are. What it really shows is the opposite.


Desperate to make a case that voter-ID laws kept "many" people who should be allowed to vote from casting ballots in Wisconsin in November, two reporters at the Associated Press claimed "it is not hard to find" examples of Badger State residents who were "turned away." Left unexplained is how reporters Christina A. Cassidy and Ivan Moreno apparently could only identify four people out of hundreds of thousands allegedly affected after six months of searching. Despite a headline claiming that those involved faced "insurmountable" barriers, each person cited could have successfully cast a ballot, but failed to do so because of inadequate follow-through.


The Associated Press had a variety of howlers from Democrats and leftists it could have included in its May 8 (update on May 9) "fact check" roundup based on events of the past week. As those who have watched the wire service's conduct since the 2016 election campaign could have predicted, it included none, and instead solely went after the Trump administration and GOP politicians on nine different claims.