A Los Angeles Times article suggests that NBC made a mistake during last night's "Concert For Hurricane Relief" when it edited from its West Coast feed rapper Kanye West’s assertions that “George Bush doesn’t care about black people”:



Pat Morrison editorializes for the LA Times, I'm going to have to break this one down one stream-of-consciousness at a time:
WHO DIED AND left Cindy Sheehan in charge? We put her in charge the press, the politicians, the people. We put her in charge not just of her own message and her mission, which is all she had asked for, but we cranked up her voice to equal volume with the man she's calling out: POTUS himself, George W.


One of the more worrying ongoing stories is the arrest of several men for involvement in a conspiracy, hatched in California's Folsom prison to attack Jewish sites and synagogues around the state. What's worrying is that one of the men apparently converted to a radical form of Islam while in prison.



(As read on-air by Rush Limbaugh)

One hot and humid weekend this past July, America’s leading Democrats -- including some of the early favorites for their party’s 2008 presidential nomination such as Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY), Senator Evan Bayh (D-IN), Governor Tom Vilsack (D-IA), and Governor Mark Warner (D-VA) -- gathered in Columbus, Ohio at a conference hosted by the centrist Democratic Leadership Council.

Predictably, the press had a hard time controlling its glee when Senator Clinton was announced as the point-person to lead the DLC’s new political offensive -- code name “American Dream Initiative” -- to define the party’s agenda for 2006 and 2008.

As Ron Brownstein of the Los Angeles Times put it:

The appointment solidified the identification of Clinton, once considered a champion of the party's left, with the centrist movement that helped propel her husband to the White House in 1992. It also continued her effort, which has accelerated in recent months, to present herself as a moderate on issues such as national security, immigration and abortion.

Unfortunately, Mr. Brownstein -- much like the rest of the mainstream print media as far as I can tell -- chose not to be completely honest with his readers -- or the American public for that matter -- concerning just how far to the right Mrs. Clinton was going by affiliating herself with this organization, and, maybe most important, what was actually in this “Dream Initiative”. (cont'd...)



The Congressional Budget Office reported yesterday that it is once again reducing its estimate for the fiscal 2005 federal budget deficit due to a surprise windfall of tax revenues, especially from corporations. However, our press seems to be doing whatever it can to once again make up look like down, good look like bad, and an improving condition look like the onset of cancer.



The Los Angeles Times reported state and federal health officials are investigating four deaths of women who had taken the RU-486 abortion-drug cocktail.


I found an interesting article by Laura King of the LA Times a few days ago. Apparently, being a reporter wasn't her first job choice. She'd rather be writing short stories, preferably about Israel's illegal occupation of the Gaza strip.

Excerpt:



Liberals' glee over Robert Novak's outburst on CNN has caused at least one major newspaper to lose sight of some facts.

Scott Collins, in today's (Fri. Aug. 5, 2005) Los Angeles Times, wrote in an article (sign-up req'd)(emphasis mine),

"The CNN incident was a leading topic for bloggers. On the liberal blog talkingpointsmemo.com, one reader wondered whether conservative activists would demand that the Federal Communications Commission fine Novak for indecency. Many conservatives complained after rock star Bono uttered a profanity during an NBC awards show and the FCC took no action."

Oops. Collins failed to mention that the FCC does not regulate indecency on cable. (Even Josh Marshall of the tpm blog remarked that this was so. Apparently Collins missed this and ran to his typewriter.) Bono's profanity occurred over NBC, which, as a boadcast outlet, is regulated by the FCC, of course.



Today's (Wed. August 3, 2005) Los Angeles Times has a story about a child-support lawsuit in Oregon between a woman and the (Catholic) Archdiocese of Portland.



David Shaw, a well-regarded media reporter for the Los Angeles Times, died yesterday at 62 from a brain tumor. As Bill Powers of National Journal just explained,  Shaw's 1990 series on media coverage of abortion was remarkable in its candor and according to Powers, influential across the media. (I'm not too sure about that, although the media did largely drop "pro-choice" in that era and switch to "abortion rights" lingo. But is the media less biased on abortion?