The media don’t just make the news, they frame it. Journalists did it this week, pushing business CEOs to quit President Donald Trump’s American Manufacturing Council. After one CEO resigned in response to Trump’s comments on the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, the media urged others to follow. The fallout resulted in Trump shutting down the group entirely.

Merck CEO Ken Frazier decided to leave the council after Trump’s comments on violence between white supremacists and counter protesters which included Antifa. Antifa are “anti-fascists” who show up to protest hateful speech and try to shut it down and have demonstrated willingness to use violence to accomplish those goals, according to CNN.


Friday morning on Fox & Friends, Washington Post Writers Group columnist Ruben Navarrette, Jr. gave President Donald Trump only grudging and partial credit for the steep decline in illegal border crossings from Mexico into the U.S. so far this year.


Celebrity climate extremist Bill Nye thinks the solution to dealing with “climate deniers” might be to just wait for them to “die” out. Talking to the Los Angeles Times on Thursday, he mocked “people who are afraid in general” as older and added, “Climate change deniers, by way of example, are older. It’s generational. So we’re just going to have to wait for those people to ‘age out,’ as they say.” 


Los Angeles Times health reporter Noam Levey, in a report that appeared in various Tronc (formerly Tribune Publishing) newspapers, filed “Equal Access to Coverage at Risk," an aggressive attack on Trump and Congressional Republicans as dishonest Medicaid slashers who pine for a return to a "medical gulag," while portraying Obamacare as a savior.


Perhaps it was the way he arched an eyebrow. Or maybe it was the momentary twitch of his nose. Could it have been that barely seen curl of the lip?

Somehow, somehow, we must see that Chief Justice John Roberts was critical of President Donald Trump in his commencement address for ninth grade graduates at Cardigan Mountain School even though his name was not mentioned nor was there anything that could be remotely interpreted as the slightest reference to him. Such desperation to discern criticism where none existed of Trump by the Chief Justice came from Los Angeles Times editorial writer Michael McGough in his July 3 opinion piece, A Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. speech that should make Trump's ears burn.


The latest episode in the Trump administration's long-running legal battle to impose a temporary ban on travel from several nations concluded on Monday. Its result, as described by National Review's David French, was that "in a per curiam ruling, the Supreme Court restored the vast majority of the Trump administration’s temporary travel ban — including the temporary ban on refugee entry." Much of the establishment press is nevertheless describing this major Trump administration legal victory as "partial" and "limited." Most reports are also failing to note that the ruling was unanimous.


When Muslim teenager Nabra Hassanen, 17, was murdered Sunday, the media propagandized that it was a hate crime. They had no evidence to do so but they did so anyway. When the Fairfax County police dispelled the myth, they pushed harder.

 


It was pretty much inevitable. Once you propose the theme of James Comey as a sexual harassment victim as happened in the New York Times, it was almost certain that the next step would be a comparison of him to Anita Hill. And it sure didn't take long. The June 9 Washington Post, followed a day later by the Los Angeles Times, have already gone with that comparison. 

The Washington Post article by Christine Emba takes a rather embarrassing stab at Comey's manhood in its title, Mr. Comey, what were you wearing that night?


During Barack Obama's presidency, we were constantly assured by the administration and its press apparatchiks that deportations had greatly increased during his tenure. So it's more than a little strange that the Associated Press is now worried that because of President Donald Trump's "crackdown on illegal immigration," fewer people who are genuinely eligible for "federal food assistance" are opting out "because of the perceived risk" that parents and guardians of eligible children and dependents will be deported.


When the term “abortionist” comes up in conversation, does the word “hero” usually follow?

That’s the light in which the  LA Times decided to tell Willie Parker’s story, in a piece about his acceptance of an award from a pro-choice women’s group.


On May 12, California Governor Jerry Brown, during a visit to that state's Orange County, said, "The freeloaders — I’ve had enough of them." His statement came during what the Orange County Register called "an impassioned defense" of the state's recently passed "road-improvement plan. The "freeloaders" he targeted with his remark are the state's taxpayers, those who wish to recall a tax-supporting legislator, and Republicans involved in putting the tax on November ballot. The rest of California's press, as well as key national press outlets, have not taken note of Brown's remark.


Shortly after the U.S. military dropped a MOAB (Mother Of All Bombs) on an ISIS tunnel complex in Nangahar Province in Afghanistan, the media began citing the alleged costs involved. The exaggerations, some by a factor of over 1,000, even after considering all of the mission's likely direct costs, were laughably wild, and resulted from a combination of sloppy thinking and ignorant reporting.