MSNBC on Wednesday offered a mix of gloating and relief as journalists recapped Tuesday’s elections in Kentucky and Virginia. Correspondent Vaughn Hillyard seemed transported as he described the Democratic gubernatorial win in red Kentucky. Meanwhile, anchor Andrea Mitchell breezily explained that Ralph Northam, who got in trouble with a blackface scandal, has “moved past” the controversy. 



The twisted tale of the students from Covington Catholic High School in Kentucky who encountered Native American activist Nathan Phillips back on January 19 took another turn on Thursday, when lawyers for the teenagers involved in the incident filed a defamation lawsuit in Kenton County Circuit Court against 12 of the “most egregious high-profile individuals.” The filing came just a few days after a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit on behalf of student Nick Sandmann that could have resulted in the Kentucky teen being awarded $250 million for defamation of character by the Washington Post.



What did Kentucky’s Republican governor Matt Bevin ever do to the New York Times? The lead National Section story in Sunday’s edition, “Kentuckians Face Conundrum in Governor’s Race,” by Campbell Robertson, tried to manufacture hope that Bevin’s bad personality (in the paper’s estimation) might be a stumbling block in his re-election race in November: "But what many seem to love about Trump -- the pugnaciousness, the go-it-alone attitude, the indifference to the normal political process -- are precisely the same things that turn some off Mr. Bevin."



In a desperate attempt to revive her relevancy following the cancelation of her E! late-night show, actress Busy Phillips joins the Hollywood bandwagon to protest recent pro-life bills. According to an announcement by the ACLU, Phillips and the ACLU have teamed up “to fight against the passage of restrictive abortion bans in states around the country.” This comes two weeks after Phillips used her own abortion story to condemn the Georgia “heartbeat” law.



It used to be that journalists didn’t need fire safety seminars to know they could get burned publishing stories that lacked facts or context. But when the original, deceptively edited video of Nathan Phillips and the Covington kids emerged, the press swaddled itself in oily rags, grabbed a Zippo and went full “Johnny Human Torch.”



On Wednesday evening, as the broadcast network evening newscasts reported on a shooting attack on a Kroger in  the Louisville, Kentucky, area, ABC stood out in not mentioning an armed citizen who shot at the gunman and might have prevented more shootings.



There were two developments Monday in the disgraceful year-long, media-underplayed saga involving threats on Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul's life. First, federal prosecutors appealed the 30-day sentence given to Rene Boucher, who violently assaulted Paul in November. Meanwhile, as NewsBusters' Nicholas Fondacro noted in a separate Monday evening post, Capitol Police arrested a man who threatened to kill Paul and “chop up” his family with an ax. Paul has now had three serious threats against his life in just over a year. Media coverage has all too often come off as indifferent and even dismissive, especially concerning the November assault.



Tuesday at the Louisville Courier Journal, part of Gannett's USA Today network, two reporters claimed that whoever vandalized a prominent billboard in that city to read "Kill the NRA" had "called out" the gun-rights group. David Harten and Darcy Costello never described the billboard as what it was while it was briefly visible: a violent threat.



In an opinion piece published by the Louisville Courier-Journal, self-described “faith leader” Rev. Lauren Jones Mayfield expressed her support for legalized abortion and argued that she is aligning herself with “the oppressed.” Mayfield, who “is on the board of Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky,” said supporting legalized abortion coincides with her beliefs.



Will MAGA murder poor Kentuckians? That was the thrust of Wednesday’s column by Eduardo Porter, liberal New York Times reporter turned leftist economics columnist, “Path Forward In Kentucky (But Don’t Get Sick).” Under the harmless headline, Porter didn’t hedge his contempt for the cost-cutting, bringing in President Trump’s trademark slogan to smear fiscal conservatives as killers for favoring Medicaid reform in the states.



Many of Kentucky Senator Rand Paul's neighbors are hotly disputing Louisville Courier Journal and New York Times reports which characterized the Friday assault on the Republican Senator as being the result of "petty arguments over misplaced lawn trimmings and branches" and "a landscaping dispute," respectively. Among their objections: The  Courier Journal's Thomas Novelly described the attack, during which Rene Boucher allegedly blindsided Paul and, per the Senator's most recent tweet, left him with six broken ribs and a "pleural effusion" as a "fight," while the opening sentence at the Times story authored by three reporters described it as an "altercation."



A Louisville Courier Journal item currently carried at USA Today by reporter Thomas Novelly seems to imply that Rand Paul deserved to be blindsided, tackled and to have possibly life-threatening serious injuries inflicted on him Friday afternoon. After all, the headline reads: "Rand Paul is not a perfect neighbor" — according to the developer of the gated community in which Paul and Rene Boucher, the alleged perpetrator, both live.