Ahead of Sunday’s new episode of the CNN series The 2000's (which is airing maybe a few years too soon), let’s take a look back at a few pathetic moments from the first episode, which focused on the decade’s movies and television. The CNN documentary blasted Fox News and MSNBC for having corroded the news discourse and heaped a torrent of praise on far-left comedians and former Comedy Central hosts Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart.



Megyn Kelly now hosts the third hour of the Today show, and it’s a less-boozy Today With Kathie Lee and Hoda than it is a daytime version of The Kelly File. Kelly has said that she’s “kind of done with politics for now,” and that she’d like her hour to be “a unifying force” in a sundered America. To which The New Republic’s Clio Chang retorts, “Too little, too late.” In a Wednesday piece, Chang charged, “Among her peers in the mainstream network television circuit, there are few who have so clearly built their career on divisive politics than Kelly.”



NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik appeared on the NPR-produced midday show Here and Now on Wednesday to discuss Megyn Kelly’s move from Fox News to NBC. He twice praised her for “cannily” negotiating herself across the media spectrum -- strange new respect which might make a conservative think she’s headed straight to the left. Then came the jaw-dropper: He said she was "desperately hoping to get away from ideology" like....Diane Sawyer or Barbara Walters.



After news broke on Tuesday that Fox News host Megyn Kelly would be moving to NBC News, the Today show promptly welcomed Kelly with an online article recalling her six “finest moments” during her tenure at FNC. Strangely, those moments focus exclusively on Kelly taking on Republicans – not a single instance was featured of her going after liberal guests.



Monday night, FNC’s The Kelly File aired a program dedicated to Donald Trump’s relationship with the media. During the one hour special, host Megyn Kelly spoke with correspondent Howard Kurtz, New York Times columnist Jim Rutenberg, Baltimore Sun media critic David Zurawik and The Federalist’s Mollie Hemingway about how the media didn’t anticipate Trump’s election win. Rutenberg brought up how the media were taken aback by Trump’s “blacklist” against certain media outlets. Kelly shot back that Trump wasn’t the only candidate to ignore the press.



So much for the tolerant left. Fox News pundit Megyn Kelly was booed by her Hollywood audience and heckled by one comedian for making a cordial remark about Donald Trump at a media event Wednesday. Kelly was speaking at The Hollywood Reporter’s annual Women in Entertainment Breakfast, a ‘Who’s Who’ gathering of prominent women in Hollywood, business, and the news industry. The audience may have been diverse but the politics surely wasn’t.


Megyn Kelly is a journalist, but she’s also a sort of actress, suggested Isaac Chotiner in a Monday review of her new book, Settle for More. To Chotiner, Kelly’s a conservative who plays a nonpartisan on TV. She has “done her best to cloud her real agenda.” And it’s worked: she has “wide-ranging respect and admiration among a press corps generally (and rightly) suspicious and dismissive of Fox News.” Chotiner is much less respectful and admiring. “The Kelly File is quite clearly ideological and very rarely ‘open-minded,’” he argued. “It is guilty of the same race-baiting and fearmongering that the rest of the network practiced throughout the election, and indeed over the past two decades.”



Monday's New Day on CNN ran a pre-recorded report by correspondent Kyung Lah in which she highlighted two Japanese-American women who suffered through living in internment camps during World War II, and touted their concerns that Donald Trump "could make a dark moment in history a reality again," this time targeting Muslims.



According to comedian Tim Allen, Hollywood liberals need to practice what they preach. On the November 21 segment of The Kelly File, Allen joined host Megyn Kelly to discuss model Gigi Hadid’s distasteful mimicking of Melania Trump at Sunday’s American Music Awards.



So the latest round of sheer nuttiness from the mainstream media? The idea that President-elect Trump intends to resurrect the infamous and quite decidedly racist “internment camps” established for Japanese-American citizens in 1942. How did this start? It started last week on FNC’s The Kelly File during a segment with Trump surrogate and former Navy Seal Carl Higbie (whom I know).



The Blaze’s Dana Loesch unleashed on the liberal media Thursday evening, during her appearance on Fox News’ The Kelly File, for creating the atmosphere for “fake news” to flourish. And she cited the Media Research Center to do it. “It was the Media Research Center and they discovered that about 8 percent of voters, they determined that maybe if what they had believed was being said about Hillary Clinton that they saw on the news, maybe if they would have believed it, it would have had an impact on the way that they voted,” she stated, “70 percent of voters don’t trust the media, that’s and MRC poll from last week.” 



During the 2016 presidential campaign, the "everybody knows" conventional wisdom in the establishment press which never went away, even as some contrary evidence appeared, was that Donald Trump's campaign, away from his rallies, was a haphazard operation which was doing very little to identify, target and persuade voters.

At the New Republic in mid-June, Jeet Heer confidently summed up the media/Democrat party line, preaching to the choir that "Donald Trump Will Be Buried in an Electoral Avalanche." A large part of his "proof"? Linking to a bogus New York Magazine analysis, he wrote: "Trump has no ground game or data analysis (and) ... he doesn’t even see the need for them." On Tuesday's Kelly File, Fox News host Megyn Kelly had on Brad Parscale, the Trump campaign's digital director, who proceeded to demonstrate how totally wrong the conventional wisdom was.