While filling in for Stephanie Ruhle during MSNBC’s 9:00 a.m. ET hour on Monday, anchor Chris Jansing promoted a book club created by Iowa Democrats in which members pledged to read campaign memoirs written by 16 of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates before the Iowa caucuses in February. Jansing touted how the “relaxed, cerebral idea” was “catching on big.”



With 21 Democrats already running for the party’s nomination in the 2020 presidential campaign, many candidates are looking for a way to stand out from the crowd. Unfortunately for former Vice President Joe Biden, he and his campaign have apparently found a way to do just that. According to a freelance reporter, the candidate and his staff have “gotten physical” in their attempts to block members of the press from asking Biden any questions in an apparent attempt to avoid any inquiries that might damage his candidacy. As if that wasn’t bizarre enough, the people working with him area also taking photographs of anyone who objects to that policy.



In their concern that all Hispanics who are in the country unlawfully as well as the U.S. Hispanic community as a whole will be tainted by the revelation that Mollie Tibbetts' murderer was a Mexican national who was unlawfully present in the United States, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists has issued a rather disturbing call for censorship, calling on media outlets to withhold referencing "race and citizenship status" when reporting on suspects involved in crimes.



Saturday’s New York Times provided a soft profile of Cristhian Rivera, the accused killer of Mollie Tibbetts: “From Quiet Village in Mexico to a Lonely Furrow in an Iowa Cornfield.” They wrote: "Cristhian Bahena Rivera, the Mexican farmworker accused of killing a 20-year-old college student and concealing her body beneath corn leaves, seemed to have built a quiet, productive life in the seven or so years since he slipped across the southwest border and found work in the fields of Iowa."



Oh, the irony. While the media are arguing that one illegal immigrant shouldn’t represent all, they are, at the same time, arguing that one man represents “toxic masculinity.”

 


A long article in the New York Times Sunday Styles, “Civility and Culture Wars In an Iowa Gun Town – When neighbors disagree but a major voice remains silent.” Jacqui Shine left big hints that Iowans are just too nice to properly confront the NRA board chairman in their midst, “Pete Brownell, a well-known and well-liked local philanthropist....He is also the third-generation C.E.O. of Brownells, a major firearms company whose headquarters are here....His public remarks have been unsurprising in the national conversation, but also strike some as unneighborly."



For a news network that is often caricatured as right wing, Fox News Channel peppered a pro-life guest with an awful lot of questions that were skeptical of Iowa's new law that bans abortion at about six weeks pregnancy. In fact, Fox and Friends Sunday co-host Abby Huntsman even cited one poll alleging a majority of Americans want most abortions to be legal, and did not mention that other polling has claimed the opposite.



Illegal immigrants (or rather, “undocumented immigrants”) remain safe under the rhetorical protection of the New York Times, if not the legal protection of American law. The top of Sunday’s Times front page featured a 3,000-word sympathetic tale, complete with huge photos, of an illegal immigrant family in Hampton, Iowa, choosing to self-deport after the husband was arrested. Reporter Jack Healy unfolded his long tale under the headline “Loving and Leaving America -- Stay, Hide, ‘Self-Deport’? Facing Hard Choices in the Heartland.”



Liberals seeking to ethnically vitiate Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio on Univision's Al Punto were shut down and embarrassed.



"[T[here is no way we get through this campaign without Donald Trump suing Ted Cruz."

That's a prediction that MSNBC All In host Chris Hayes dropped on his guests, NBC News Trump campaign correspondent Katy Tur and the Huffington Post's Sam Stein. For her part, Tur was inclined to disagree.



Concluding his interview with the chairwoman of the New Hampsire Republican Party in a Manchester diner on Wednesday afternoon, MSNBC host Chris Matthews went on an odd tangent about how the topography of the Granite State supposedly makes it edgier than "flat" Midwestern Iowa. "Topography spells character," Matthews insists.
 



MSNBC weekend host and Wake Forest professor Melissa Harris-Perry had a scary confrontation with a hostile man in Des Moines. He wanted to know why MSNBC would pick her for a show. (Many people might ask this question.) She wrote a blog on how this somehow caused her to think of being raped as a child and maybe this man had come to murder her. Without more of a recreation of the unpleasant conversation -- with just swatches of Nazi references and anger -- it's impossible to know how unglued this accuser was. 

The "safe space" was violated. Her piece began: "I don't know if he was there to kill me."