The New York Times Thursday ran a long investigative piece by climate reporter Hiroko Tabuchi, “E.P.A. Retreat Leaves Wound In Small Town.” The online headline made it political: “A Trump County Confronts the Administration Amid a Rash of Child Cancers.” It’s the old “cancer cluster” concept that alarmist reporters use to push business regulations or in this case protect regulations from repeal, with the Times trying to imply a link that isn’t proven or even substantiated, even by the scientists quoted,, while keeping the Trump administration (which had nothing to with the underlying pollution) front and center and suggesting hypocrisy by Trump supporters.



On Monday's New Day, CNN co-host John Berman claimed that voting rights in the U.S. are "under siege" in some states controlled by Republicans as he introduced a "Reality Check" segment by left-leaning CNN analyst John Avlon. The left-leaning CNN contributor misinformed the audience by repeating misinformation about voter purge laws in states like Ohio and Georgia as he wrongly suggested that voters could be kicked off the voting rolls simply for going a couple of years without voting.



Chalk this up as something that wouldn’t have happened in 2009 under President Obama and Vice President Biden. In an Indianapolis Star column published Friday in USA Today, Matthew Tully wondered what the U.S. would be like if President Trump left “the presidency at some point” under any number of circumstances.

 



A friend told me he couldn't wait to see the videos of crowds of cheering Carrier workers when Donald Trump arrived at the company's plant in Indianapolis to celebrate management's decision to keep a substantial portion of its production there instead of moving it to Mexico.

If there such are photos or videos out there, I haven't seen them. There may be a reason for that apparent absence or lack of prominence beyond the press's long-recognized desire to keep the public from seeing large, positive crowds at Trump appearances. The real concern here appears to be widespread recognition of the fact that the President-Elect, half of whose followers Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton outrageously described as "a basket of deplorables ... racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it," just worked to save the jobs of a workforce that is half African-American.



For the second day in a row, the CBS Evening News committed a disservice to their viewers in covering competitive U.S. Senate races by censoring massive pasts of Democratic challengers with Wednesday featuring the newscast omitting any mention of former Senator-turned-candidate Evan Bayh having a lucrative lobbying career since he left the Senate in 2011.



Even when the New York Times does run articles (not on the front page) about Democratic scandals, it tried desperately to turn attention to old Republican Party controversies. That was the case with two Friday articles involving possible Democratic vote fraud and electoral disruption.



Assuming it thinks that orchestrated voter registration fraud and fraudulent voting are legitimate problems, the Associated Press's Friday attempt to explain the developing situation in Indiana on Friday was woefully incomplete. Unlike in other instances of documented and alleged fraud cited during this election cycle, and perhaps only because law enforcement is involved, the AP has at least given the Indiana situation national attention. But after two shorter stories describing the growing scope of the probe to nine Hoosier State counties and then to 57 (now 56), a Friday "answers" dispatch by Rick Callahan provided woefully insufficient detail about the ACORN-like group behind the alleged fraud under investigation.



Before Apple CEO Tim Cook publicly revealed his sexuality, he received advice from CNN’s Anderson Cooper — who came out publicly in 2012. That’s what Cook told The Washington Post in a wide-ranging interview including his views on homosexuality and environmentalism.



Much like Phil Mickelson took a big early lead in the British Open, Esquire’s Charles Pierce has taken a big rhetorical-excess lead in early blogging about Donald Trump’s VP pick, Indiana governor Mike Pence, calling him a “very strange and completely unreconstructed wingnut” whose paper trail contains “a rich deposit of sweet crude crazy.” Kevin Drum of Mother Jones described Pence as "not especially bright or quick on his feet, which means he might have trouble defending Trump's frequent idiocies and backflips. It should be fun to watch him squirm.”



In what is a recurring theme, Univision once again saves its most insanely biased analyses for its digital platform. This time the network comically welcomes Mike Pence to the Republican ticket, confirming every Establishment Media stereotype in the process.



How left-wing is NPR?  On Monday, it unspooled this opener: “It will be Indiana's turn tomorrow to vote in the presidential primaries, and that gives us the opportunity to remember one of the state's most famous politicians.”

Dan Quayle? Birch Bayh? President Benjamin Harrison? Nope. “Eugene V. Debs ran for president as a Socialist five times in the early 1900s, once in 1920 from prison.” The online headline was “Eugene V. Debs Museum Explores History Of American Socialism.”



Last week the New York Times, proving its social liberal bona fides, crowned North Carolina as the home of bathroom bigotry against transgenders. On Friday, it was Indiana’s new abortion restrictions that were up for vulgar mockery. Yet the same day, the Times also showed how to sell people on transgenderism, door to door. Reporter Mitch Smith celebrated feminist activism in the form of a rain of coordinated hostile tweets sent to Indiana’s Republican governor Mike Pence after he signed pro-life legislation: “Women Irked by Abortion Law Make Governor the Butt of Social Media Ridicule."