Hollywood loves using the Coronavirus pandemic as an opportunity to bash the Trump administration's priorities. But what about Hollywood’s priorities? Is it a good time to drag out a bunch of Asian and Asian American actors to continue a petty squabble about the President’s usage of the phrase “Chinese virus,” something he has even dropped in the past week?



NBA legend and Trump hater supreme Kareem Abdul-Jabbar leveled a double-barreled attack on the president in recent days. In The Guardian, he claimed the NBA is providing a patriotic response to the pandemic, but President Trump is promoting his own self interests. In The Hollywood Reporter, Abdul-Jabbar says the president reminds him of the Nazi's exploiting people of color in the Hunters series.



Maybe many folks aren’t so into this drag queen and kids phenomenon after all. Netflix just announced that it’s new-ish drag queen-centered show starring RuPaul and his enthusiastic 10 year-old sidekick has been cancelled after just one season. Good. There’s proof that there is some sanity in the world.



Journalists are a fragile bunch aren’t they? They get away with quite a lot, but when Trump mutters “fake news,” or a senator calls a CNN hack a “liberal hack,” they respond as if Kim Jong Un’s torturing them for stealing a propaganda poster. Fear not however, as HBO and Harvey Weinstein nemesis Ronan Farrow are teaming up to remind the world just how “under fire” journalists are, not only around the world but in America.



For some reason the big kahuna of Hollywood award shows, the Oscars, can’t do progressive right — even with all the liberal celebrities and their woke speeches — angering practically everybody in the media by nominating white male individuals for a majority of this year’s biggest categories.



According to a Hollywood Reporter story, disgraced ex-CBS This Morning co-host Charlie Rose may have made a former intern watch an S&M scene, had a nickname of “Charlie Fuckin’ Rose” and intimidated his co-hosts who might stand up to his alleged sexual abuse. In the deposition, a lawyer asked, “Did you have a nickname in the studio, Charlie fuck'n Rose?” Rose responded in the affirmative



Add Toy Story 4 to the list of ridiculous things called racist. In a January 3 op-ed, The Hollywood Reporter managed to deem a movie about animated children’s playthings to be problematic. While offering effusive praise for Toy Story 4 being “exuberantly entertaining” and “creatively conceived,” in the end, author Stephen Galloway reported he was left with a “slightly bitter taste” and the “sense that something was naggingly wrong.”



At this point, there really is only one major unresolved plot point remaining in the endless Star Wars saga: Where are the gay space aliens? Surely a story that spans galaxies and light years and campy dive cantinas must have run in to some, er, marginalized sexualities. Surely space pirates must have accidentally raided a “Wookie Cruise.”



Saturday Night Live went after a conservative family group for objecting to a lesbian ad on the Hallmark Channel during the sketch comedy show’s December 14 episode hosted by actress Scarlett Johansson.



Actress, filmmaker and “activist” Olivia Wilde just published her Thanksgiving interview with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at the Hollywood Reporter, and take it from us, it was was most fawning, softball interview imaginable. Well of course Hollywood activists love Nancy, though the amount of flattery Wilde heaped on the Dem politician would’ve made Grima Wormtongue sick.



Hollywood is the entertainment arm for the Democratic Party, we get that. However, it’s weird to think both establishments are so intertwined that even individuals as successful as failed Georgia gubernatorial candidate and former romance novelist Stacey Abram gets one of her naughty memoirs turned into a full-length TV series.



Timing is everything for living legend Clint Eastwood The actor/director served up American Sniper after Hollywood stopped firing cinematic shots at the U.S. Military. The results? Sniper earned $350 million at the U.S. box office. Two years later Eastwood directed Sully, just when movie goers craved a true American hero story. That movie hauled in $125 million domestically.