A recent article in The Guardian dons the foreboding title "Robots will destroy our jobs -- and we're not ready for it." The article claims, "For every job created by robotic automation, several more will be eliminated entirely. ... This disruption will have a devastating impact on our workforce." 



At his passing on Wednesday, sensible people fondly remember Billy Graham. But to the progressive fanatics at The Guardian, bringing millions to Christ and the comfort of religion counts for nothing. He never cared about climate change or sought big government policies as a solution to America’s problems.



In the wake of the immense political conflagration that Michael Wolff’s upcoming book Fire and Fury has caused, Thursday’s Morning Joe was almost entirely consumed by discussion of all its salacious claims and their implications for the Trump White House. Even though multiple guest panelists on the show admitted to the shaky factual foundation for Wolff’s book and the unproven nature of many of his assertions, they nevertheless largely treated his testament as gospel.



Harry Belafonte once called Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice house slaves and called for Obama’s opponents to be jailed. So if October 20th really was the singer and activist’s “last public appearance,” our national discourse should be getting a whole lot healthier.



The only unforgivable sin in this culture are being conservative. Everything else is so easily forgiven and forgotten by the media. Kathy Griffin made it to the cover of The Guardian this week, dressed as Che Guevara, the infamous Marxist revolutionary who helped bring communism to Cuba and murdered a whole lot of people while doing it. The public most likely knows her best as the woman who channeled ISIS and held up a severed bleeding fake head that looked like Trump for a photoshoot. But in the interview, Griffin maintained that she had done nothing wrong.

 



Why, oh why, can't you Florida yahoos accept that Hurricane Irma was caused by global warming? That was the desperate but condescending attitude of the UK Guardian reporter Ed Pilkington in his September 11 article about Hurricane Irma which expressed surprise that (GASP!) Floridians did not buy into the global warming dogma as the cause of the storm. His condescension begins with the title of the story, Floridians battered by Irma maintain climate change is no 'big deal':



An upcoming tough-on-crime vigilante movie is now Exhibit A of “alt-right” racism, according to the reliably left-wing U.K. newspaper The Guardian. The remake of the popular 1974 action-family vengeance-drama Death Wish, with Bruce Willis cast in Charles Bronson’s shoes as the tormented hero, is scheduled for release around the Thanksgiving holiday. But is it just a fascist alt-right fantasy? Guardian critic Graeme Virtue piece was one long piece of virtue-signaling and throat-clearing, an apparent requirement for movie critics these days, not even getting around to addressing the entertainment value of a movie with content that may possibly offend some liberal interest group somewhere (months before it’s even coming out).



On Monday July 24, the parents of the terminally ill baby Charlie Gard released a statement that they would be withdrawing their petition to have their son treated. While many in the UK and across the world mourned the travesty and injustice of the court’s decision, others sought to justify the reasoning behind it. In a piece for The Guardian, UCL health professor, Ian Kennedy, expressed sympathy for the plight of Charlie, but ultimately justified it on the basis that “children do not belong to their parents.”



Are you a good witch or a bad witch? The question is currently being asked by feminists who want to use the idea of being a witch to their advantage. In the new book, Witches, Sluts, Feminists: Conjuring the Sex Positive, author Kristin J. Sollee argues that witches are a good term to fall back on for feminists, since “Men have always feared powerful women.”

 



Actress Jenny Slate had a lot to say to The Guardian during her interview on  June 18. She’d like everyone to know that the current state of affairs in America is “really an emergency.” While Barbara Ellen asked the questions, Jenny Slate gave just the right answers, recited from the same old liberal catechism. Trump bad, abortion good, Planned Parenthood great.

 



When Muslim teenager Nabra Hassanen, 17, was murdered Sunday, the media propagandized that it was a hate crime. They had no evidence to do so but they did so anyway. When the Fairfax County police dispelled the myth, they pushed harder.

 



On Wednesday night, Montana Republican congressional candidate Greg Gianforte allegedly body slammed The Guardian’s Ben Jacobs the night before the state’s special election. Jacobs went to a hospital to be checked out and had his glasses smashed, so what’s known about the incident isn’t pretty to say the least. Importantly, any assault of anyone (reporter or non-reporter) isn’t okay. This should be common sense. That being said, the deranged reactions to the incident must be denounced too, most notably Washington Post supposedly right-leaning blogger Jennifer Rubin’s tirade on MSNBC’s All In.