On Wednesday's Good Morning America, ABC correspondent Linsey Davis tried to link President Donald Trump to a controversial religious figure in a way that it is unlikely that the news show would do if it involved a Democratic President instead. Near the end of a report updating viewers on the unusually bad flu season, Davis showed video of evangelist Gloria Copeland suggesting that it was not necessary to get a flu shot, alleging that prayer could prevent the flu, before the ABC reporter identified her as "an advisor on the President's evangelical board."

 


ABC, NBC and CBS all ignored a bombshell report released by Senator Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), Chairman of the Homeland Security Committee overnight, which revealed more critical evidence concerning how the FBI handled the Hillary Clinton e-mail probe. The Committee also released more damning text messages between FBI agents Peter Strzok and Lisa Page which showed an intention by the agents to find evidence to impeach President Trump as well as the news that President Obama wanted to be involved in the Clinton email investigation.


On Wednesday morning, NBC’s Today show and ABC’s Good Morning America recited identical liberal talking points as both broadcasts warned viewers that the U.S. was on the verge of looking like world’s worst “authoritarian regimes” if the Pentagon followed through on President Trump’s desire to hold a military parade in the nation’s capital.


Good Morning America anchor George Stephanopoulos tried desperately to connect President Trump with a former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page as a Russian agent working with the Kremlin during an interview on the ABC morning show. However, no matter how hard the former Clinton staffer pressed Page, he didn’t gain any ground in proving his Democrat-agenda-driven talking point.

 

“Just because it’s biased, doesn’t mean it’s not true.” That was the assessment from Good Morning America journalists and analysts on Saturday while discussing the intelligence memo released on Friday. Guest Matt Dowd touted the already tired “Al Capone vault” comparison. 


The knives came out on ABC during their Sunday morning programming as they made President Trump and the GOP the target of their hyperbolic smear campaign following the release of the House Intelligence Committee memo detailing alleged misconduct by the FBI and Justice Department. And at one point during This Week, host George Stephanopoulos and Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent Martha Raddatz suggested that the “discord” and “mistrust” sowed by Republicans was ultimately helping Russian President Vladimir Putin.


Good Morning America anchor George Stephanopoulos practically had a conniption on Friday’s show, complaining he was "stunned" by a single tweet from the president questioning the FBI and Justice Department’s impartiality around “release the memo.” As soon as the show had begun, Stephanopoulos jumped right in to tout the tweet as the “bitter” final straw between Trump and the two organizations.

 

All three networks on Thursday hyped the “escalating” fight over a “controversial,” “bombshell” memo set to be released alleging surveillance abuses. ABC’s Good Morning America touted Democratic “outrage.” At the same time this story developed, ABC and NBC ignored what should be big news: The revelation that the FBI in 2016 waited a month before telling Congress of additional Hillary Clinton e-mails. 


The 2016 election still isn’t over for the liberals in the media, who keep trying to find ways to prove that President Trump “obstructed justice” and should be impeached, just past a year into his presidency. Thursday on ABC’s Good Morning America, anchor and former President Clinton staffer George Stephanopoulos eagerly hoped they had finally found the evidence needed to oust Trump.


Appearing on ABC’s Good Morning America Wednesday morning to review President Trump’s State of the Union address, Chief Political Analyst Matthew Dowd worried that he “didn’t get any sense there was any room for compromise” in the speech and even proclaimed that the nation was as divided today as it was during the Civil War.


On Monday, all three network morning shows read from the same script as they tried to preempt President Trump’s State of the Union address with dour coverage of “controversies looming” over the speech and the President’s “record-low approval rating.” The broadcasts also touted how “deeply divided” the nation was on the eve of Trump’s remarks.  


With President Trump set to address the nation during the State of the Union on Tuesday, the White House billed the theme of speech as “building a safe, strong, and proud America.” But during some of the network morning shows on Sunday, journalists appeared eager to get past the address and forget about it, maybe even as soon as “Wednesday afternoon,” as one guessed.