During Monday morning’s edition of the Fox & Friends program on the Fox News Channel, co-host Ainsley Earhardt moderated a debate between two guests over whether Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal should step down after the Democratic official posted an online message that “I hope Trump is assassinated!”


The journalists at Good Morning America on Tuesday could barely contain their contempt at Donald Trump’s “strange” and “bizarre” fascination with Fox & Friends. The President retweeted several stories from the Fox News show and this apparently doesn’t sit will with ABC. Yet the ironic part is that ABC didn’t cover an ObamaCare story that Trump tweeted about. Apparently, it didn’t occur to the reporters that such bias is why the President goes around the mainstream media. 


CNN host Alisyn Camerota has been making appearances recently to discuss her new book, Amanda Wakes Up, which is a fictional work that is nevertheless based in part on her past experiences working as a FNC host for the weekend edition of Fox and Friends. Camerota -- who left FNC to join CNN three years ago -- has been showing this past week a greater willingness to criticize her former employer -- yesterday on CNN's Reliable Sources, going so far as to charge that her old FNC show "unnecessarily stoked outrage" and "took a really myopic view of, say, President Obama or the current administration."


Friday morning on Fox & Friends, Washington Post Writers Group columnist Ruben Navarrette, Jr. gave President Donald Trump only grudging and partial credit for the steep decline in illegal border crossings from Mexico into the U.S. so far this year.


On Saturday morning, MRC Associate Culture Editor Katie Yoder appeared on Fox & Friends: Weekend to discuss the networks’ “media double standard” while covering the case of Charlie Gard. Talking with Fox & Friends host Clayton Morris, Yoder noted that mainstream media has, for the most part, ignored the tragic story of the terminally-ill British infant.


On Wednesday's Fox and Friends, as Fox News producer Greg Pergram reported in by phone in the aftermath of the attack on congressional Republicans in Alexandria, Virginia, he incorrectly recalled that it was the KKK that Scalise was accused of meeting with, when in reality the debunked accusation was that he spoke to a white nationalist group that was founded by David Duke. Additionally, Pergram failed to inform viewers that, even though Scalise issued an apology, the central claim that Scalise spoke to Duke's group was undermined both by a flyer from the event that did not list Scalise as a speaker, and by a man who helped organize the event who claimed that he invited Scalise to speak at a separate gathering that was not part of the white nationalist convention.


Even before President Donald Trump announced on Thursday, June 1, that the U.S. was pulling out of the Paris Accord regarding climate change, Eric Wemple -- a media blogger for the Washington Post -- slammed one of Trump's "favorite television shows,” Fox & Friends, which airs mornings on the Fox News Channel, as “a planetary threat.”

The columnist began by stating he would “gauge the sophistication of climate change discussion” on the program, referring to remarks made by Mark Steyn, whom he dismissed as just “a conservative commentator.”


Thursday morning, Harvard Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy issued a report which confirmed what NewsBusters reported in April, namely that President Donald Trump "has received unsparing coverage for most weeks of his presidency, without a single major topic where Trump’s coverage, on balance, was more positive than negative, setting a new standard for unfavorable press coverage of a president." On Sunday, CNN's John Berman tried to cast Fox News as a conservatively biased outlier — as opposed to the relatively fair and balanced entity it has actually been during the Trump administration's early months — by selecting the results of one tiny element of the Shorenstein report and presenting it as if it was the study's comprehensive conclusion.


During the opening monologue of his eponymous ABC late-night comedy show Wednesday, Jimmy Kimmel crudely joked that President Trump could shoot dead one of the three co-hosts on the Fox News Channel’s Fox & Friends and still have the other two’s full support.


The story is a revealing look inside the liberal media bubble. Over here at Politico is this headline “The Strange Psychological Power of ‘Fox & Friends.’” But it’s the sub-headline that provides the real look inside both the liberal media bubble and the left-wing mind. That would read: “Unrelenting positivity has a powerful warping effect on your thinking. So how is that affecting Viewer No. 1?”


The establishment press, even as it works to censor known but inconvenient facts and shout down or constantly interrupt guests who attempt to present them, continually lectures new media, particularly center-right media, about the need for evidence before reporting or even discussing anything in print or on the air. There's hardly a better illustration of what a hypocritical stance this is than Lawrence O'Donnell's wild theory, recklessly speculated on Rachel Maddow's MSNBC show on Friday, that Vladimir Putin "might have orchestrated what happened in Syria this week" to benefit "his friend in the White House," Donald Trump.


On Friday, Adam Housley at Fox News delivered bombshell news that a "very well-known, very high up, very senior (person) in the intelligence world" not in the FBI had engaged in "the unmasking of the names of American citizens" in the course of surveillance surfacing "members of the Trump administration" that had  nothing to do with Russia ... or foreign intelligence of any kind." On Sunday morning's Fox & Friends, Clayton Morris reported that the Big Three broadcast networks, CNN and MSNBC devoted had to that point devoted absolutely no coverage to what Housley reported, despite granting heavy play to a Thursday New York Times story which Housley's sources insist is wrong.