From the "Hello, darkness, my old friend ... I've come to talk with you again" files:

ESPN has drop-kicked one of its college football broadcasters from the Virginia vs. William & Mary game, on Sept. 2, for no reason other than his name is "Robert Lee." This is no joke. ESPN really is that sensitive and that PC. That childish, too, for that matter.


Most people across the country have little trust in the “mainstream media” due to unchecked errors and false reporting, but on Tuesday, Mike Wise -- a former Washington Post columnist who's now with ESPN's The Undefeated -- joined that group when he was disciplined for posting false quotes in an attempt to prove people will believe anything published online.


On Wednesday, Kevin Durant of the NBA champion Golden State Warriors, said he won't attend a celebration for the team at the White House if an invitation is extended. One of the liberal commentators on ESPN praised Durant for that decision, insisting it's not political. Another ESPN talk show co-host ripped into President Trump and says he is fed up with people complaining about sports media going political.


ESPN is eating crow -- Jim Crow -- and enduring the humiliation of its fellow race-baiting rivals, many of them crowing about its racial insensitivity. The Worldwide Leader in Sports is apologizing for a segment in a 28-hour marathon in which an auctioneer "sold" NFL players. The headshot photos of black and white players were attached to popsicle sticks, and drew criticism on social media that the auctions were too similar to the slave auctions of olden times.


The big boys and girls at Disney have come up with a novel idea. They plan to launch two new streaming ventures, one family-oriented and the other for ESPN. This new Netflix-style version of ESPN will stream 10,000 hours of live sports annually that isn't available now on ESPN cable channels. The sports menu would include baseball, hockey and soccer, along with Grand Slam tennis and a lot of college sports.


Writing on The Undefeated blog site today, ESPN's Stephen A. Smith says that in light of current events the question has switched from who will stand up with Colin Kaepernick to "who could possibly stand against" the ex-quarterback. And who plays the villain to his hero? President Trump, of course.


During Sunday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during discussions of the white racist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, White House advisors were repeatedly referred to by panel members as "Nazis" or "white supremacists." And in one segment, as the group fretted over Colin Kaepernick's outcast status in the NFL, ESPN columnist William C. Rhoden oddly claimed that "a lot of players" in both the NFL and Major League Baseball "have kind of support from these people -- the Nazis or white supremacists," as host Joy Reid responded in agreement.

 


ESPN sigue con su costumbre de inyectar políticas de izquierda a su cobertura de eventos en el mundo deportivo. En esta ocasión, la cadena decidió aportar opiniones a su cobertura de la inducción al Salón de la Fama del Beisbol del receptor legendario Iván "Pudge Rodríguez".


ESPN continues its trend of injecting left-wing politics into its coverage of events in the sporting world. This time, the network decided to add its political two cents to its coverage of MLB legend Ivan "Pudge" Rodriguez' induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame.


Another NFL team signs an obscure backup quarterback not named Colin Kaepernick and another Left-stream media member is unhinged. This time it was the Baltimore Ravens signing the unheralded David Olson that pushed ESPN's Jemele Hill over the edge.


America is a sports-crazy nation, but you certainly can’t tell that by ESPN’s television ratings anymore. If losing to the Teletubbies in viewership ratings isn’t a repudiation of the so-called “world leader in sports and entertainment,” I don’t know what is.


It started Monday as a simple suggestion by former NFL quarterback Michael Vick that free agent Colin Kaepernick might rehabilitate his image with the league by cutting his afro. Now it's erupted into a war of words between ESPN and Fox Sports 1's Jason Whitlock, who called his former employer the "PC, Safe Space Network."