On Thursday, shortly after news broke of the Capital Gazette massacre in Annapolis, Maryland, Conor Berry, a reporter at the The Republican newspaper in Springfield, Massachusetts, published a tweet which appeared to be serious claiming that the shooter "dropped his #MAGA hat on the newsroom floor before opening fire." Berry, a journalist with 21 years of experience, is now an unemployed journalist, as he resigned on Friday.



Reporters often get basic facts wrong and otherwise embarrass themselves when attempting to explain specifics about guns. This is what happened to Pete Williams at MSNBC Friday morning as he tried to describe shotguns in the aftermath of Thursday's Capital Gazette massacre in Annapolis, Maryland.



With so many possible selections, it's hard to come up with a worst-of list to rank the most pathetic attempts by CNN's Jim Acosta to pose as an oh-so-tough reporter. His Friday stunt, though, was in the upper echelon for its laughable false bravado.



Wednesday, actor Peter Fonda went on quite the Twitter tirade, calling for harm to be done to members of the Trump family. Not even the left-leaning Slate Magazine could defend Fonda’s remarks, calling them “obscene and sexist.”



First reported by The Daily Caller’s Joe Simonson, the Department of Justice’s Inspector General report on the Hillary Clinton e-mail probe found on Thursday that not only were “numerous FBI employees...in frequent contact with reporters” when they shouldn’t have been, but they “improperly receiv[ed] benefits from reporters,” including food, golf trips, and tickets to sporting events.



We've come a long way from harmless playground jibes like “your mother wears combat boots,” to those of today from the likes of Samantha Bee and other leftist “entertainers” who say things about President Trump and his family that are so vulgar they can't be printed in a newspaper or quoted on television.



On Sunday’s installment of Showtime’s The Circus, CNN Tonight host Don Lemon was profiled and he lashed out at President Trump as a “racist” and insinuated that Trump’s criticism of him was racially-based. Thankfully, the show also profiled our friends at the Daily Caller and, to the show’s credit, the interviews allowed for Daily Caller personality to offer some excellent points about liberal media bias.



On Monday morning, Stormy Daniels’s attorney and frequent liberal cable news guest Michael Avenatti threatened to sue our friends at the Daily Caller, stating in an e-mail that he could move to “sue each of you and your publication” for “hit pieces that are full of lies and defamatory statements.” Avenatti’s e-mail came less than 12 hours after a Sunday night piece by associate editor Peter Hasson and media reporter Joe Simonson entitled “With Avenatti In The Spotlight, His Own Questionable Past Emerges.”



The House Judiciary Committee recently held a hearing on social media filtering practices. Unsurprisingly, a Pew Research Center study found that “Today around seven-in-ten Americans use social media to connect with one another, engage with news content, share information and entertain themselves.” With so many Americans on these platforms, we should know how the platforms determine the content they’re sharing.



On Wednesday morning, CNN’s chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta cried foul in a tweet concerning a Variety interview released Tuesday in which he insulted the intelligence of the American people by claiming that “[t]hey don’t have all their faculties in some cases” when it comes to the rise of fake news and rhetoric from the President or his advisers about the liberal media.



As Scott Whitlock noted Tuesday afternoon, CNN's perpetually aggrieved Jim Acosta was at it again, hinting at a conspiracy behind a lost broadcast connection: "I won’t read into why we lost connection just a few moments ago." Acosta's Tuesday whining shouldn't cause us to forget or ignore what he did on Monday, when he set a new low for journalistic rudeness by shouting questions at President Donald Trump during the White House Easter egg roll.



On Wednesday, a U.S. judge began considering lawsuits brought by San Francisco and Oakland, California claiming that multinational oil companies conspired to keep the alleged facts about alleged global warming from the public. Clearly the most newsworthy development, reported by advocates and skeptics alike, is District Judge William Alsup's contention that evidence submitted by plaintiffs of this alleged conspiracy “shows nothing of the sort.” Sudhin Thanawala at the Associated Press didn't report it, instead celebrating how Alsup supposedly got a "climate change lesson."