News consumers everywhere should prepare for the onslaught of climate change stories ahead of the UN climate summit next week.

Instigated by Columbia Journalism Review and The Nation, more than 250 media entities joined forces to foster urgency and action regarding the climate “crisis” and devote extra time to what CJR claimed was “the defining story of our time.” Partners included CBS, PBS Newshour, Bloomberg, AFP, Getty Images, Adweek, CQ and Roll Call, The Guardian, Newsweek, Rolling Stone and many more including a huge number of local media.



Objectivity and truth-telling are no longer the most “sacred” responsibilities of the news media, at least according to the far-left The Nation magazine. It’s now … climate change. “We see Covering Climate Now as a fulfillment of journalism’s most sacred responsibilities, which are to inform people and foster constructive debate about common challenges and opportunities,” The Nation wrote on Aug. 28.



On Monday, socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders issued an op-ed on his "plan for journalism" at the liberal Columbia Journalism Review. Since he's a socialist, the obvious problem in media is large corporations that shouldn't be allowed to merge, and the obvious answer is more socialism -- taxing advertising to fund "public media." As if NPR and PBS stations don't sound the same notes as most large corporate media outlets?



The Columbia Journalism Review interviewed New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet over the Times changing its Tuesday morning lead headline after a left-wing social media mob complained it wasn’t sufficiently hostile to President Trump, in the wake of the mass murders in El Paso and Dayton. The paper’s own “Reader Center” also issued a mea culpa in “A Times Headline About Trump Stoked Anger. A Top Editor Explains."



I never thought I would write this, but the publisher of The New York Times, A.G. Sulzberger, is right. Sulzberger wrote an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal in response to President Trump's claim that his newspaper committed “treason” by publishing a story about U.S. efforts to compromise Russia's power grid should Moscow again try to meddle in U.S. elections. The Times says it consulted National Security officials who raised no objections to its publication.



Liberals insist Donald Trump is a very serious threat to freedom of the press, and often avoid discussing how Barack Obama was the worst president for cracking down on reporters and their use of government sources. Now they insist Trump will be the worst. But two liberals at the Columbia Journalism Review also report that Team Obama was even worse than previously thought. 



Liberal billionaire George Soros gives millions each year to fund a left-wing media empire that promotes far-left opinions. It’s only natural that some of those Soros-funded or Soros-linked media are pushing the eco-socialist Green New Deal and hoping to influence the upcoming presidential race. The Green New Deal resolution was introduced by Democratic Socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Sen. Edward Markey (D-MA). Ocasio-Cortez described it as a “comprehensive agenda of economic, social and racial justice,” aiming to force a New Deal-like federal mobilization designed to “achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions through a fair and just transition.”



Paul Bedard of the Washington Examiner reports on another new poll demonstrating that confidence in the media “has hit rock bottom, with many news consumers believing that reporters file their reports before knowing the facts.” The press had a higher percentage of people choosing they have "hardly any confidence at all" in it than the Congress. 



For a healthy dose of how liberals write unintentional humor, see this Columbia Journalism Review article: "How did Republicans learn to hate the news media?" Larry Light claims Republicans have a "prejudice" against the news media, as if there is no evidence....like you've never, ever spent a day on NewsBusters. 



Money talks – and journalism is no exception. On Monday, Columbia Journalism School announced that digital media expert Raju Narisetti will serve as a full-time faculty member in two capacities: Professor of Professional Practice and the director of the Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism. But neither he nor the Columbia Journalism School disclosed his unprecedented number of political donations to Hillary Clinton while working in the media.



News stories might have cost Hillary Clinton the presidency, but they were real stories from Manhattan, not fake stories from Macedonia. That’s the major takeaway from a new content analysis of media coverage of the 2016 campaign that the Columbia Journalism Review published on Tuesday. 



Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne seems to be the personification of what the Columbia Journalism Review meant when its writer Jon Alsop noted on November 9 that Media too thirsty for a narrative shift on Trump. Alsop pointed out that the liberal media, desperate for a win against President Donald Trump, have latched onto last Tuesday's election results as confirmation of their urgent hopes. Perhaps none was more thirsty for such a narrative shift than laughably failed prognosticator E.J. Dionne as we shall see.