Finally, a lefty who doesn’t blame guns for shootings. No, Indian American activist and former Democratic congressional candidate for Colorado Saira Rao knows what’s really going on: “whiteness — ALL WHITENESS — is killing us.” Rao shared her conclusion in an August 12 tweet. The mass shootings by white males in Dayton and El Paso -- combined with her tolerant, sunny liberalism -- convinced the former candidate that America needs a campaign for “ending whiteness.”



One of the two shooters at a high school in Colorado hated Christians, Republicans and praised Barack Obama. Yet none of the networks have, so far, covered his angry social media posts. This is in contrast to other occasions when they have tried to pin violence on conservative ideology. 



On Monday's NBC Nightly News, the show devoted a full report to a group of five women -- all Democrats -- who were recently elected to the Colorado state senate at the same time, helping to hand their party control of the legislative chamber away from Republicans.



Between Thursday and Friday, CNN's New Day show has twice covered the story of a white police officer in Nashville who shot and killed a black suspect who, although armed, appears to have been running from him in surveillance video. But the same show lately has paid little attention to recent cases in which police officers have been attacked or killed, appearing to be more interested in stories that make the police look bad, especially those that involve racial issues.



On Saturday night, CNN Newsroom with Ana Cabrera ran a report by correspondent Scott McLean which highlighted concerns that marijuana legalization in Colorado has sparked an increase in violent crime by attracting more criminals to move to the state.



Since last week, a number of Fox News shows have been following the case of an illegal immigrant in Denver, Ivan Zamarripa-Castaneda, who was arrested and charged with vehicular homicide after a deadly hit and run. The city of Denver not only refused a request by ICE to detain the prisoner, but, after he posted bail, he was released before ICE was even notified so they could try to apprehend him at the court house.

 



Let's imagine that an activist for a conservative cause supported committing physical violence up to and including murder against people doing things he or she sees as "immoral" in a letter to the editor at a local newspaper, and that this same person was behind a state ballot initiative designed to limit the activities of those "immoral" people. No one would reasonably expect that the leading newspaper in the state involved would for all practical purposes ignore this person's activities. But from all appearances, the Denver Post has virtually ignored the violence-advocating Andrew O'Connor, as well as his co-sponsorship of a Colorado ballot initiative to double the severance tax on the "immoral" oil and gas industry, since April 19.



In a report aired on Sunday's 60 Minutes on CBS -- and previewed in a piece on Friday's CBS Evening News -- medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook highlighted some of the problems seen in Colorado that have increased in the couple of years since the state legalized marijuana use in 2014. LaPook spoke with a doctor from Pueblo County who recalled a substantial increase in women giving birth whose newborn babies test positive for marijuana, threatening the babies with permanent brain development problems.



Flaming tap water made for compelling imagery and anti-fracking activists and news media used it to make drilling for natural gas look dangerous. But a new study reported by the Denver Post further undermined such claims.



Some on the left claim that Donald Trump is an ideological descendant of Ronald Reagan, never mind that Reagan was Mr. Conservative and Trump is Mr. Opportunist. Paul Campos, from the University of Colorado, makes a different Trump-as-heir-to-Reagan argument. In a Thursday Salon article, Campos opined that the Reagan revolution was less about right-wing views than “stupidity, celebrity, and plutocracy,” and that Trump is its “natural culmination.”

Campos sniped that “being famous for being famous is a sufficient basis for winning [the] presidential nomination [of] the party of Reagan, the know-nothing B-movie star” and stated that Trump’s electoral success “marks the triumph of plutocracy in its purest form. Ronald Reagan hated government, and loved business, to the point where he helped create our national infatuation with the idea of the heroic businessman…In a culture that worships both stupidity and celebrity, the self-serving lies of famous plutocrats are often swallowed whole.”



On the Nov. 30 edition of MSNBC's MTP Daily, pro-abortion rights absolutist Sen. Barbara Boxer was given free rein to draw a line connecting pro-life rhetoric with Friday's fatal shooting at a Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood abortion clinic. While guest host Steve Kornacki meekly asked the California Democrat if she saw a connection between the two, he failed to chastise her for smearing a significant plurality, if not majority, of Americans who consider that, yes, abortion does end a human life and hence amounts to killing babies.



On Wednesday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency committed an act which would have likely become instant national news if a private entity had done the same thing.

On Friday, John Merline at Investors' Business Daily succinctly noted that the EPA "dumped a million gallons of mine waste into Animas River in Colorado, turning it into what looked like Tang, forcing the sheriff's office to close the river to recreational users." Oh, and it "also failed to warn officials in downstream New Mexico about the spill." Yet here we are four days later, and the story has gotten very little visibility outside of center-right blogs and outlets. That's largely explained by how the wire services have handled the story. After the jump, readers will see headlines and descriptions of the stories which have appeared thus far at the web site of the New York Times: