La burbuja finalmente estalló en los medios de comunicación de habla hispana que ya no pueden contener la vergonzosa realidad vivida por los hispanos en California, el estado que supuestamente lidera la lucha por los derechos de los inmigrantes.  



It seems that the list of liberal news media receiving selective leaks from Democrats trying to prove President Trump guilty of …. What was it? – includes CNN en Español.



Just in time for Halloween, the nation ́s Spanish-speaking news media seemingly agreed to put a scary spin on the latest developments in the DACA saga. The words “fear” and “scared” are liberally sprinkled throughout DACA coverage, in order to frighten so-called “Dreamers” into action regarding their status.



In an attempt to demonize the current Administration´s actions to ensure undocumented families can be kept together through their immigration proceedings, CNN en Español interviewed John Amaya, an attorney who served in the Obama Administration at ICE and the DOJ, among other positions, and currently works for a private law firm dealing with – you got it-  immigration. His answers were “creative” to say the least, and raised the question: How much does CNN truly underestimate the intelligence of its viewers?



Yes, it´s true. People over 55 years of age are prospering across the nation. But so are Latinos - and as one Hispanic investment ace tells us, they are not the only ones, much to the chagrin of the liberal Spanish-speaking media that continue to make a case for an ailing economy about to crash and for Donald Trump to be deep-sixed.



Now that Mueller and the dossier are ancient (buried) news, the liberal Spanish-speaking media will jump at any chance (asides from its non-stop illegal immigration litany) to declare doomsday for President Trump and his Administration. Case in point: the possibility, according to Univision, CNN en Español and Estrella TV, of an economic recession that could put an end to Trump’s claim to credit for the current economic boom. 



 As soon as Trump announced his re-election campaign, CNN en Español knew it had its topic for its weekly program “Choque de Opiniones”, which displayed a false sense of non partisanship between the special guests. But at times, anti-Trump snark took precedence over substantive policy discussions.



With the outbreak of controversy over recent state abortion laws aiming to challenge the United States' currently extreme pro-abortion regime, pro-life voices have notably been able to make their case on several of the nation's top Hispanic television networks.



During the Trump administration Hispanic unemployment has hit five all-time record lows, but the nation’s number one Spanish-language television newscast, Noticiero Univision, once again blew off the latest blockbuster economic news for the country’s largest minority group, which participates in the American labor force at a higher rate than any other segment of the U.S. population.



Latino news networks in the United States exist for one sole reason: to inform Hispanics who prefer watching relevant content in Spanish. As such, it would seem only natural for major economic news directly affecting that viewership to occupy headlines on the nation’s top Spanish-language media outlets. Yet, as MRC Latino has repeatedly noted, the subject is consistently either ignored or under-reported, with the latest example being the new record low of 4.3% for Hispanic unemployment in February 2019.



The annual March for Life and Women’s March have become back-to-back events for two large, sharply clashing constituencies. By covering the Women’s March 17 times more than the March for Life, the top two national Spanish-language television newscasts in the United States reveal their clear preference for publicizing the agenda of one march, but not the other.



Once again showing systemic anti-Trump bias, the principal national evening newscasts of the six leading Spanish-language television networks in the United States all pointedly declined to report on President Donald Trump’s soaring job approval ratings among Hispanic-Americans.