Following the horrific mass shootings in El Paso, TX and Dayton, OH, CNBC asked Visa CEO Alfred Kelly about the role of corporations in gun control. Kelly condemned the shootings and called for legislative action on gun control, but defended his company’s processing of gun sales on CNBC’s Squawk Alley August 7. CNBC technology reporter Deirdre Bosa asked him if his views had evolved over the past year. She cited other payment platforms like Apple, whose CEO Tim Cook slammed U.S. lawmakers’ “insanity” on the issue.



Even those who work at Google have noticed the search engine’s unfair tilt towards liberal news outlets. Google engineer Greg Coppola, who was suspended by his company for speaking to Project Veritas, published a July 25 post on Medium analyzing Google News. Coppola re-enacted a project done by PJ Media’s Paula Boylard in order to demonstrate Google’s liberal manipulation of its algorithms



CNBC editor-at-large John Harwood didn’t just interview 2020 Democratic candidate Beto O’Rourke about the economy July 5. He literally asked questions while eating Mexican food with the candidate. That jovial setting was perfect for the easy and friendly interview Harwood conducted. Harwood often lets his liberal views show on CNBC. CNBC.com described the interview as O’Rourke “filling in the blanks” on his economic plans which included raising taxes.



On Wednesday and Thursday NBC, MSNBC, and Telemundo will host the first Democratic primary debates. If they are to match what their CNBC colleagues did with the Republican candidates in 2015, they should ask questions designed to humiliate, badger and paint the Democratic field as not ready for prime time, cartoonish, out-of-touch extremists. 
 



One of the left’s favorite economic talking points is an obsession with income and “wealth inequality.” In keeping with that trend, CNBC editor-at-large John Harwood offered five approaches to “fight” wealth inequality for the “economically helpless” on June 19. Most of those five proposals were liberal solutions including suggestions for taxing those at the top, imposing a higher minimum wage and spending on infrastructure. Harwood’s left-wing bias has been on display at CNBC for years.



Multimedia journalists beware, if you create a video about a candidate’s proposal without any opposing perspectives, that’s not news and your video will look like blatant advertising. That’s exactly what CNBC’s video about Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and her student loan plan looked like on June 14. It described Warren’s plan in detail, but only her details beginning with her words and citing others on her side.



Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) hit the campaign trail promoting “Democratic socialism” and claiming President Donald Trump supports “corporate socialism for the rich and powerful.” CNBC anchor Joe Kernen demanded clear definitions and answers from a Sanders adviser on June 13, attempting to learn whether democratic socialism would really mean more entitlements and government control.



In spite of the disappointing May jobs report showing only 75,000 new jobs, MarketWatch and CNBC reported signs of continued strength in the labor market that could help ease economic jitters. MarketWatch reporter Jeffry Bartash asked, “Has the U.S. labor market really taken a big turn for the worse?” and answered, “A new pair of employment reports suggest the answer is no.” He cited a private study of employment that indicated “a steady if more subdued pace of hiring during the summer” and “near-record high” job openings (7.4 million) in April, which was coupled with an “extremely low” number of layoffs.



Shark Tank star Kevin O’Leary and CEO Gerald Storch brought a free market reality check to Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-VT) arguments for a $15 minimum wage on CNBC’s Squawk Box June 6. Sanders went to Arkansas to attack Walmart over wages and demanded at its annual shareholders meeting that it raise wages even more on June 5. O’Leary and Storch both opposed a wage mandate, saying markets do a better job of setting wages than the government.



A healthy and growing economy should be good news, but CNBC claimed it could put marriages at risk. Although the liberal media often talk, downplay, or spin economic news, CNBC provided a very strange complaint about the current “strong economy” on June 1. It warned “marriage could suffer” because of economic strength. CNBC personal finance reporter Jessica Dickler wrote that given the relative strength of the economy today, marriages could be in trouble or at risk of divorce.



Even CNBC's more liberal anchor wasn't thrilled with newly announced plans from Democratic candidates to tax Wall Street transactions. Reporter Ylan Mui told Squawk Box viewers on May 23 about plans from liberal candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), and Pete Buttigieg (D-IN) to tax Wall Street to pay for expensive things like "free" college.



April was a great month for jobs with another upside surprise.

CNN reported on May 2, that it was expected to be “a healthy but unspectacular” 185,000 jobs. Unemployment was expected to remain at 3.8 percent. MarketWatch was expecting a “robust increase” of around 213,000 jobs.