In spite of the disappointing May jobs report showing only 75,000 new jobs, MarketWatch and CNBC reported signs of continued strength in the labor market that could help ease economic jitters. MarketWatch reporter Jeffry Bartash asked, “Has the U.S. labor market really taken a big turn for the worse?” and answered, “A new pair of employment reports suggest the answer is no.” He cited a private study of employment that indicated “a steady if more subdued pace of hiring during the summer” and “near-record high” job openings (7.4 million) in April, which was coupled with an “extremely low” number of layoffs.



Shark Tank star Kevin O’Leary and CEO Gerald Storch brought a free market reality check to Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-VT) arguments for a $15 minimum wage on CNBC’s Squawk Box June 6. Sanders went to Arkansas to attack Walmart over wages and demanded at its annual shareholders meeting that it raise wages even more on June 5. O’Leary and Storch both opposed a wage mandate, saying markets do a better job of setting wages than the government.



A healthy and growing economy should be good news, but CNBC claimed it could put marriages at risk. Although the liberal media often talk, downplay, or spin economic news, CNBC provided a very strange complaint about the current “strong economy” on June 1. It warned “marriage could suffer” because of economic strength. CNBC personal finance reporter Jessica Dickler wrote that given the relative strength of the economy today, marriages could be in trouble or at risk of divorce.



Even CNBC's more liberal anchor wasn't thrilled with newly announced plans from Democratic candidates to tax Wall Street transactions. Reporter Ylan Mui told Squawk Box viewers on May 23 about plans from liberal candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), and Pete Buttigieg (D-IN) to tax Wall Street to pay for expensive things like "free" college.



April was a great month for jobs with another upside surprise.

CNN reported on May 2, that it was expected to be “a healthy but unspectacular” 185,000 jobs. Unemployment was expected to remain at 3.8 percent. MarketWatch was expecting a “robust increase” of around 213,000 jobs.



The U.S. economy grew so much more than expected in the first quarter that CNBC’s Rick Santelli called it a “whopper” and “really powerful” news on April 26. A day later, the news made the front page of The Washington Post and The New York Times.

The broadcast networks were less enthusiastic. Two out of the three evening news programs skipped the story entirely that night.



Economic growth bested expectations by nearly a percentage point in the first quarter, and “pushes back” against recent recession fears, according to CNBC.

“First look at first quarter GDP and it is a whopper! 3.2 percent.” on-air editor Rick Santelli announced on April 26. “A 3 handle on first quarter. It’s supposed to be the dog of the year in terms of which quarters excel. This is really powerful.”



Saturday marks 20 years since the tragic Columbine school shooting in Littleton, Colorado. Liberal journalists have already begun their retrospectives that included requisite attacks on the NRA and gun owners. The following is a look back at the most biased and ugliest broadsides in the weeks following the April 20, 1999 Columbine shooting:.
 



The liberal media launched an offensive against both of President Donald Trump’s selections for the Federal Reserve board of governors.

The media have outdone themselves slinging mud at the “controversial” and “unqualified” picks of economics writer and Club for Growth founder Stephen Moore and millionaire businessman, former CEO and former presidential candidate Herman Cain. Cain also served as a director for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Directors provide “insight on current and emerging issues” in the business community.



The strong March jobs report “should end” concerns that a recession is “lurking” as one Hill op-ed suggested March 1. The media worried and speculated over recession throughout the entire month of March.

The government released the March jobs report on April 5, showing 196,000 jobs added — more than 20,000 higher than expected. It also showed unemployment holding steady at 3.8 percent.



In spite of growing wages, extremely low unemployment and nearly 3 percent economic growth in 2018, the liberal media are becoming obsessed with recession. It didn’t matter that CFOs were confident the U.S. economy “will not experience a recession” in 2019. They were fixated by recession prospects in March anyway.

Every. Single. Day.



In the wake of the announcement on Sunday that Robert Mueller “did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia,” many in the news media are visibly upset with the Special Counsel for not being more aggressively anti-Trump. On Monday’s New Day, for example, CNN legal analyst Laura Coates exclaimed that it was “really atrocious” that Mueller refused to make a legal conclusion about whether the President had committed obstruction of justice, while over on NBC’s Today, co-host Savannah Guthrie fretted: “Is that a cop out? Isn’t this his job?”