The government's Friday June jobs report showed that the economy gained 213,000 seasonally adjusted payroll jobs, while the nation's unemployment rate increased from 3.8 percent to 4.0 percent, primarily because 601,000 more Americans were in the labor force. Despite the increase in overall joblessness, the rate among Hispanics fell to 4.6 percent, its lowest level in the over 45 years of that statistic's history. Unlike in recent months, during which print and online establishment press outlets have mostly recognized record lows seen in black/African-American unemployment, the press has been very quiet about June's record Hispanic low. This has been particularly true at most of its perceived gatekeepers.



Last month, 213,000 new jobs were added to the U.S. economy — more than expected by analysts. Jobs figures from the previous two months were also revised up by a total of 37,000 jobs. This good news about job gains and increased participation in the labor market drew praise from CNBC’s panelists on July 6, even from former Obama administration economist Jared Bernstein.



An investment conference isn’t the typical place to hear climate change complaints and attacks on capitalism, but that’s exactly what attendees heard at the Morningstar Investment Conference in Chicago on June 12. Investor Jeremy Grantham, co-founder of $70 billion global asset management firm, Grantham Mayor Van Otterloo (GMO), blamed capitalism for threatening the planet, according to CNBC.



In light of the #MeToo sexual harassment movement that swept the nation this past year, more politicians and media types are facing scrutiny they may never have faced or at least haven’t faced in years. Take former President Bill Clinton, for example, who was pressed on his treatment of Monica Lewinsky after their affair, on NBC’s Today show Monday.

 


In his coverage of Friday morning's stellar jobs report, the Associated Press's Chris Rugaber came up with a couple of doozies aimed at curbing readers' enthusiasm. The AP economics writer half-expected that employers would rein in their hiring over confrontational rhetoric President Donald Trump and other foreign leaders have recently engaged in over trade and tariffs. He also implausibly framed the record-low black unemployment rate of 5.9 percent merely as evidence that employers are just now finally "taking chances" with potential workers "they had previously ignored."



Today’s journalists routinely assert that it is “extreme,” “dangerous,” and possibly even criminal for the White House – or anyone else, for that matter – to criticize an investigation into the President. But twenty years ago, Independent Counsel Ken Starr was savaged by the same liberal media during his investigation of then-President Bill Clinton. At that time, Starr was harangued as a “partisan” and “inept prosecutor,” and a “peeping Tom.”



Former President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, have signed an extensive contract to create new movies and television shows for Netflix. That agreement potentially includes scripted and unscripted programs, documentaries and feature films. Of course, the Monday announcement came as no surprise to anyone familiar with the connection between the pay-cable channel and the former Democratic occupants of the White House, along with Obama Administration officials and entertainment executives who have supported the family in the past.



As though it wasn’t bad enough that some journalists are distorting Donald Trump’s attacks on the murderous MS-13 gang, journalist John Harwood on Thursday tweeted a sympathetic spin on the vicious killers. Instead of altering the President’s comments to be an attack on immigrants, the CNBC reporter offered a defense of the vile criminals who dismember their victims.



Superheroes, the naming of a new royal and an adorable child umpire were all more important to ABC, CBS and NBC news than the latest U.S. economic data.

The Commerce Department announced a better-than-expected estimate of GDP — 2.3 percent — for the first quarter of 2018. In recent years, first quarters have been beset with weakness and economists expected the number to be 2 percent or a little less.



On-air editor Rick Santelli announced the first quarter gross domestic product (GDP) estimate for CNBC’s Squawk Box on April 27. “Holy cow! Better than expected up 2.3 percent. You know many were thinking, and there’s a lot of reasons to believe so, that it would be a bit under the 2 percent. So 2.3 of course, as follows 2.9 last quarter,” Santelli said.



CNBC’s on-air editor Rick Santelli reacted to the April consumer confidence numbers positively, but the same night ABC, CBS and NBC evening news programs all ignored the latest update of consumer attitudes toward the economy, as did their Spanish-language counterparts, Univision and Telemundo. “Some breaking news: Consumer confidence, we are looking for a read on April and the number is 128.7, sequentially following 127 [in March]. This is a really good number. 128 and change is the best level since February's 130. 130 was best level going back to the year 2000. Very lofty levels indeed,” Santelli said during Squawk on the Street on April 24.



Robert Johnson, the founder of BET television and America’s first black billionaire, had some positive things to say about the economy in April, but most liberal media failed to notice. The one national paper to cover it delayed including it in the print edition for more than a week. Citing multiple factors including “fairly stable” interest rates, the “Trump tax cut,” and historically low unemployment for African Americans, Johnson said, “Business is very good.”