One of the sad hazards of being a former community organizer is that when you end up enjoying the good life, some in the community you left behind will accuse you of ignoring them. Such is what happened in the May 16 Chicago Sun-Times when columnist Mary Mitchell made that accusation against former president Barack Obama who has been busy since he left office shuttling between the Virgin Islands and Tahiti and similar points in between.

 



While observing World Press Freedom Day on May 3, MSNBC aired an advertisement encouraging viewers to watch not just that liberal channel, but also follow more than 25 other left-leaning sources and newspapers while not mentioning Fox, the most-watched news network on cable TV. The spot, which was created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), begins by stating: “Don’t just watch MSNBC” and concludes with the motto: “Read more. Watch more. Understand more.”



On Wednesday, "the Cook County (Illinois) Board of Commissioners repealed the penny-an-ounce levy on sweetened beverages it passed last November." The inflammatory "Big Soda" label appears frequently in press coverage of this reversal of what the government-always-knows-best crowd had thought was a major nanny-state victory, and reflects the fact that many in the media are quite unhappy with this turn of events.



The media don’t just make the news, they frame it. Journalists did it this week, pushing business CEOs to quit President Donald Trump’s American Manufacturing Council. After one CEO resigned in response to Trump’s comments on the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, the media urged others to follow. The fallout resulted in Trump shutting down the group entirely.

Merck CEO Ken Frazier decided to leave the council after Trump’s comments on violence between white supremacists and counter protesters which included Antifa. Antifa are “anti-fascists” who show up to protest hateful speech and try to shut it down and have demonstrated willingness to use violence to accomplish those goals, according to CNN.



Chicago Sun-Times theater and dance critic Hedy Weiss was roundly accused of racism when calling out police stereotypes and reminding readers of a sad fact: gun violence often occurs within the Chicago ‘community, itself.’



Tragedy is painful, but it sometimes has the side benefit of bringing people together during a time of crisis. However, Politico columnist Roger Simon declared his intent to refrain from such action with a hit piece for the Chicago Sun Times on Attorney General Jeff Sessions in which he also decided that it would be appropriate to make light of the shooting of Congressman Steve Scalise.



With just three weeks to go, major newspapers (with a circulation of at least 50,000) are walloping Donald Trump in their official endorsements, favoring Hillary Clinton by a count of 68 to zero. Out of a total of 82 newspapers that have offered an editorial on who their readers should vote for, 68 (83 percent) of them have endorsed Hillary Clinton, five (6 percent) recommended Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson, two (2 percent) advised to vote for anybody but Trump and seven (9 percent) newspapers offered no endorsement at all.



Neil Steinberg of the Chicago Sun-Times decided last week to purchase an AR-15 following the Pulse night club shooting in Orlando, Florida. His purpose, he said, was to demonstrate how simple it was and to explore Illinois’ gun laws concerning assault weapons. When he bought the gun, Steinberg planned to sell it back to the store. However, his purchase was stopped by the gun store, which canceled the transaction during Illinois’ required 24-hour waiting period after discovering he had lied on his background check about his history of alcohol abuse and domestic violence.



The Chicago Public Schools system, from which came Arne Duncan, perhaps the nation's most execrable Education Secretary, is in serious financial trouble. So is the State of Illinois. Having already borrowed against next year's property tax collections, CPS somehow expects the state to bail out its underfunded pensions to the tune of $500 million. Though it has subsequently been narrowed, MRC-TV, in covering the district CEO's resignation over a federal no-bid contract investigation, reported in June that the district was facing "a $1 billion budget deficit" for fiscal 2016.

In the midst of all of this, the district's teachers union has overwhelmingly authorized a strike. In searching several current articles on the topic, the hardest things to find were answers to two questions any reasonable person would ask: 1) How much do teachers currently make? and 2) What are their contract demands?



One would think the editorial boards of the nations’ top newspapers – journalism’s brightest and best – wouldn't lightly throw around inflammatory language, slurs and insults.

But it appears that an Indiana law protecting the religious freedom of businesses and individuals is so beyond the pale it had the journalistic high-priests at many of America’s top 20 papers sputtering “bigot,” “homophobia” and “anti-gay.” 



A review of the "Big Story" archive at the Associated Press's national site on Jesse Jackson's name returns quite a few instances where the wire service has treated the "Reverend's" self-injection into stories considered nationally important as noteworthy.

In addition to the predictable plethora of stories relating to Ferguson, Missouri and "police-communities tension," Jackson's name has recently appeared in two stories about a Chicago area Little League team stripped of its national title over "falsified boundaries," tech jobs for minorities, an Ebola patient and several relating to the National Football League. But somehow, Jackson's endorsement of Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, who is challenging incumbent Chicago Democratic Mayor and former Barack Obama chief of staff Rahm Emanuel in its April 7 runoff election, is not a "Big Story" or present anywhere else on AP's national site, indicating that the wire service considers it a mere local item.



Once you become Chicago's mayor — or one of its alderman, for that matter — getting reelected is ordinarily a fairly easy proposition.

The scheduling of Election Day, the fourth Tuesday in February in an off year, is deliberately designed to generate a low-turnout result. Incumbents' well-oiled political machines turn out their old reliable voters, while to have any kind of chance, challengers have to motivate people who ordinarily vote once every two or four years to show up at the polls. Thus, the fact the President Obama-endorsed incumbent Mayor Rahm Emanuel couldn't seal the deal on Tuesday is utterly astonishing.