Before Tuesday's Texas primary, the press presented woefully incomplete early-voting data as evidence of a potential Democratic wave. It was fake news.



On Monday, CBS News tried to claim that buying a gun is easier in Florida than purchasing several household items, obtaining a marriage license, or getting medical marijuana. Glaring errors in its comparisons rendered its effort a fake-news failure.



Those who linger at the The New Yorker magazine's website eventually see a splash advertising its dedication to "fighting fake stories with real ones." Staff writer John Cassidy's ridiculous assertion that "George Soros Upstaged Donald Trump at Davos" shows that this is clearly false advertising.



On Tuesday night as the election results came in from Alabama, a number of news outlets reported on the Department of Justice obtaining thousands of text messages between controversial FBI officials Peter Strzok and Lisa Page showing their disdain for “awful,” “idiot,” and “loathsome” President Donald Trump, creating yet another headache for Robert Mueller as the Trump-Russia probe drags on.



Last week, Anthony Crupi at AdAge.com was either willfully ignorant or deliberately deceptive when he claimed that the size of the National Football League's TV ratings decline is inconsequential. Crupi also appears to be quite wrong in contending that actual game attendance — not reported attendance, but "turnstile" attendance — during the 2017 season is only barely down compared to last year.



The liberal media pounced immediately on the release of President Donald Trump’s outline for tax reform calling it “one big lie,” complaining about tax “cuts for the wealthy,” and saying the plan “stinks.”

Columnists and editorials spewed the most venom, but news reports were also biased and often turned to “an early analysis” from the liberal Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. However, since Trump had only announced a “framework,” The Wall Street Journal slammed them for “claiming to be clairvoyant” about the specifics and its “record of hostility to any GOP tax reform.”



Thursday was a terrible day for the Democratic Party as they were rocked by two major scandals. First, Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal wrote on Facebook that she wanted President Trump assassinated. Second, Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s former IT staffer, Imran Awan was indicted on bank fraud among other charges. Again, it was a damaging day for the Dems but you wouldn’t know it from watching the Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) who ignored all of it.



On Friday's This Morning show, CBS News reporter Adriana Diaz reported on her seven days on the streets of Chicago's South Side, one of the most dangerous and crime-ridden areas in the U.S. While her report gamely tried to focus on how guns were to blame for the violence, astute observers who know how difficult it is for law-abiding citizens to get guns in the Windy City will notice that, despite those state- and city-imposed barriers, it's still very "easy" for criminals to get guns.



Mainstream media bias isn't just against President Trump, but also Israel. On Friday, CNN, NBC, ABC, and CBS published headlines equating three terrorists behind clashes in the West Bank during the day with three Israelis who were stabbed to death the following night in the area.



In advance of the Monday evening premiere of the CBSN Originals documentary Gender: The Space Between, CBSNews.com published propaganda pieces promoting the radical left’s perverted LGBT agenda. The articles’ liberal narratives, devoid of any conservative counterbalance, provided another example of the media’s activist approach to covering the revolution to redefine gender and normalize all permutations of sexual proclivity.

 



To CBS Sports blogger R.J. Anderson, Colin Kaepernick will do just fine if he never plays football again. On the other hand, when Tim Tebow resumes life as a professional athlete he will do so as a "divider."



A week ago, the Columbus Dispatch reported that Wendy's, the fast-food chain, announced "plans to install self-ordering kiosks in 1,000 of its stores — about 16 percent of its locations — by the end of the year." Although company officials observed 18 months ago that such a move would be inevitable if the trend towards laws demanding far-above-market minimum wages continued, both J.D. Malone's Dispatch story and the Associated Press's condensed version based on Malone's work do not mention minimum wages at all.