One reason Democrats seem so fixated on importing illegal immigrants and allowing their children to stay and become citizens may be the exodus from high-tax and traditionally Democratic states. Anecdotal evidence is usually not helpful in determining trends, but when stories begin to accumulate and sound the same attention must be paid. Two friends of mine, who are longtime California residents, recently decided to move from that highly taxed state to states with lower taxes.



Perhaps in a effort to compete with CNN featuring live bong hits during its New Year’s Eve coverage and excited by California’s plan to legalize recreational marijuana in 2018, on Tuesday, NBC’s Today began a new series dubbed California’s Green Rush. In a promo that aired during the morning show, an announcer declared: “California’s going to pot. From mainstream delivery to pot luck dinners. In the New Year, the Golden State is turning green.”



New York Times’ Clyde Haberman decided that it was prime time to bash Proposition 187, the 1994 California ballot initiative restricting government aid to illegal immigrants which passed into law, only to be declared unconstitutional, but which nonetheless spawned similar acts nationwide: “Failed Referendum That Propelled Policy on Migrants.” Haberman virtue-signaled this would be no objective look at the issue by crying out “xenophobia” in the first sentence. The paper made a big production of Haberman's piece, coupling it with a special nine-minute “Retro Report” video contrasting the state of the immigration debate, then and now.



The New York Times’ Thomas Fuller filed from Berkeley, where the journalist offered some disturbing ambivalence about the whole First Amendment thing, a tone evident in the headline: “Let Right-Wing Speakers Come to Berkeley? Faculty Is Divided.” It’s a pattern at the Times, with recent pieces suggesting free speech was merely a “canard” used by right-wing racists.



On Tuesday, before Ben Shapiro's appearance at the University of California at Berkeley, Bari Weiss, a staff editor and writer in the opinion section at the New York Times, penned an op-ed accurately describing Shapiro's beliefs, defending his right to speak, and criticizing the "sloppy conflation" by leftist politicians and all too many in the press in trying to label all conservatives as "alt-right." Howls of leftist outrage ensued at the Times and on Twitter. Two days later, a longtime reporter in the Bay Area proved Weiss's point.

 



It’s amazing, but someone in the media actually wrote something about how awful Antifa is – and gave a firsthand account. Frank Somerville anchors the 5, 6, and 10 p.m. news on KTVU in San Francisco, posted about the following experience he had at a Berkley protest. On his Facebook page, Somerville posted an article on how he “experienced hate firsthand” and “…it came from these people dressed in all black at a protest in Berkeley. Ironically they were all chanting about no hate.”



On May 12, California Governor Jerry Brown, during a visit to that state's Orange County, said, "The freeloaders — I’ve had enough of them." His statement came during what the Orange County Register called "an impassioned defense" of the state's recently passed "road-improvement plan. The "freeloaders" he targeted with his remark are the state's taxpayers, those who wish to recall a tax-supporting legislator, and Republicans involved in putting the tax on November ballot. The rest of California's press, as well as key national press outlets, have not taken note of Brown's remark.



If a federal judge allowed a lawsuit to proceed alleging that police led participants in a far-left protest rally into a gauntlet of violence-prone right-wing counter-demonstrators, and that several protesters were pummeled and hurt as a result, it would be nationally prominent news. But the national establishment press, and the California press outside of the San Francisco Bay area, have just demonstrated that when the political affiliations of those involved are different, it's not news, even when the aggrieved protesters win a significant court victory affirming their depiction of events.



Colin Kaepernick is a free agent and the chirping of crickets is deafening amid the silence among NFL general managers. One anonymous GM, quoted by The Mercury News, suspects the lack of interest shown in the controversial quarterback stems from the fear of fan backlash or hate for the former 49er who refused to stand for the national anthem last season.



Thomas Fuller's New York Times piece pushed for a public works program in La La Land that comes with a big promise and a $64 billion price tag: A high-speed railway that will one day, theoretically, connect San Francisco and Los Angeles in less time than in takes to watch The Dark Knight Rises. The story’s headline and tone pit stingy, stick-in-the-mud conservatives against sunny, striving liberal futurists: “Silicon Valley Rail Upgrade Is Imperiled Amid G.O.P. Ire.” But some of the dirty details got lost in Fuller’s glittery view of the future of “high-speed rail” in California, the ones that less starry-eyed outlets like the Los Angeles Times have noted.



In his opening monologue and first guest conversation Monday evening, Fox News's Bill O'Reilly sharply criticized the national and local press coverage of the past week's immigration raids. In his Talking Points Memo opener, O'Reilly observed the press's utter failure to headline the fact that the raids targeted criminal illegal aliens, describing that failure not as press bias, but as "blatant dishonesty." The host's first guest then accused the press of deliberately drumming up uncalled-for "mass hysteria," and described the operation as "the same kind of operation they did conduct under President Obama."



New York Times Emily Badger dominates all of page 3 of Thursday’s print paper, with “Immigrant Shock: California Offers Hint of Nation’s Future,” a long “Upshot” analysis operating under the unspoken assumption that Donald Trump voters were prejudiced and skitterish of different-looking people invading their neighborhood. She even roped Rush Limbaugh’s 1980’s Sacramento radio show into her essay as a marker of racist anti-immigrant hostility.