The New York Times a saw a rough road ahead for Trump cabinet choices. Meanwhile, media reporter Jim Rutenberg documented the latest go-round of Trump vs. the mainstream media, which Rutenberg claimed were “Outgunned, Outmaneuvered and in Need of a Game Plan.” And his NY Times colleagues provided a backhanded compliment, saying the president-elect’s social media wasn’t all “anger and spittle.”



Appearing as a panel member on Tuesday's CNN Tonight to discuss President-elect Donald Trump's press conference in which he accused CNN and BuzzFeed of peddling "fake news," CNN senior media correspondent Brian Stelter whined about the term "fake news" being "misused" and "exploited" by "partisans on the left and right" as he declared that he agrees with the Washington Post's Margaret Sullivan that "it's time to retire the term." 



It’s hard to focus on how insane the alt-left is in a week where pretend journalists from BuzzFeed post an unverified dossier accusing President elect Trump of bizarre sex habits. I set a bar for how crazy liberals have become and try to focus on stories that hurdle the bar. For all that I have zero respect for anyone or anything connected to Buzzfeed, I didn’t expect them to crawl underneath.



In his must-read Politico Magazine column published on Tuesday, National Review editor Rich Lowry doled out some advice for hyperventilating journalists over President-elect Trump blasting their profession (like this week when BuzzFeed News published the salacious dossier). 



Logic and proportion may be non-factors in media coverage of Donald Trump’s presidency, fears Lloyd Grove. In a Wednesday column, Grove opined that journalism “is in danger of passing through the looking glass, only to land in a menacing, topsy-turvy world, namely the White House Press Room…It’s likely to be [a] place where language will occasionally signify its opposite, and government spokespeople will declare, as Humpty Dumpty famously scolded Alice, ‘When I use a word, it means what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.’” The key to this process, indicated Grove, is the use of the term “fake news” as the “Trump administration’s rightwing-populist bludgeon to delegitimize the purveyors of real news.” Among Grove's expert witnesses: Dan Rather.



Following BuzzFeed’s reckless decision on Tuesday to publish an erroneous and salacious document pertaining to President-elect Trump, a diverse array of conservative leaders (including Media Research Center President and Founder Brent Bozell) offered their reactions to this damaging publication of fake news.



CNN's Jim Acosta and Brian Stelter blasted Donald Trump on Thursday's New Day over the President-Elect's treatment of the media at his Wednesday press conference. Acosta, who got in a face-off with Trump, expressed his "hope...that Donald Trump can get past this...'Clinton News Network, CNN sucks' mentality that we saw out on the campaign trail." Stelter bewailed how "the environment right now is so far from normal."



The journalists at Nightline could barely contain their contempt for Donald Trump at Wednesday’s press conference, mocking it at a “hyperbolic,” “circus”-like atmosphere. Without providing a lot of context about the unverified claims made by BuzzFeed and repeated by CNN, Jon Karl worried, “Unbelievable.  I mean, to see a President-elect of the United States call out a news consideration.” 



CBS assigned blame for the verbal battle between Donald Trump and CNN’s Jim Acosta at Wednesday’s press conference. Even though Acosta started the exchange by yelling at the President-elect, it was Trump who “lashed out” to “punish" a reporter. ABC saw the incoming President as “seeking retribution.” 



Claws came out Wednesday night on MSNBC’s Hardball as host Chris Matthews aired a half-hour long special dedicated to digging into the absurdity of BuzzFeed News publishing “salacious fake news” regarding President-elect Donald Trump. Matthews, who is known for his own outrageous statements, seemed incredibly disturbed by the whole situation. He at one point declared, “It’s certainly not journalism. I'm not sure what it is.” 



The decision by the “mainstream media” to run a salacious and unsubstantiated article regarding President-elect Donald Trump that was first posted on the BuzzFeed website has drawn extensive criticism, including accusations that this choice is “the media's latest self-inflicted wound” and “irresponsible journalism.” Those accusations were made on Tuesday by James Warren, the chief media writer for the Poynter Institute website and former managing editor and Washington Bureau chief for the Chicago Tribune and the New York Daily News.



Calling Buzzfeed stories “journalism” is “like calling dog food filet mignon,” MRC Vice President of Business and Culture Dan Gainor said on Wednesday.