In an appearance Sunday morning on ABC's This Week, New York Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer teased his party's economic plan which will be unveiled Monday. One hopes, probably in vain, that it incorporates an understanding of basic economics. Schumer betrayed the fact that he has little to no such understanding when he declared that "gas prices are sticky," and that when the "price for oil goes up on the markets ... it never goes down." This Week host George Stephanopolous was to so interested in pushing Schumer about "single-payer" health care, aka a full government takeover of health care, that he didn't even notice (or pretended not to).


NBC’s The Carmichael Show is a show that, while leaning liberal, still manages to crack jokes at the crazier left-wing antics (which seem to be happening more often recently). If you need any more proof, just know that this episode managed to work in the Women’s March with only minimum eye-rollage and a few laughs along the way.


Now we know that advertisers and the public are being supplied fake ratings by the same broadcasters who so often deliver fake news. A Thursday morning Wall Street Journal dispatch by Joe Flint reports that the broadcast networks routinely inflate their reported evening news audiences. They hide low-performing evening audiences by — get this — "forgetting how to spell."


Pity ABC, NBC and CBS News. If the fall TV season comes and Sean Spicer is no longer White House Press Secretary, they’ll have to talk about something besides Saturday Night Live. Like maybe … news. Spicer is rumored to be leaving the press shop for another job in the administration. And if he’s not the daily face and voice of the Trump administration, it’s going to be hard for actress Melissa McCarthy to reprise her lampoon of him on SNL.


Thursday evening, CBS's Scott Pelley, who officially ended his tenure as the network's Evening News anchor the following evening, told viewers that "It's time to ask whether the attack on the United States Congress Wednesday was foreseeable, predictable and, to some degree, self-inflicted." It's clear from Pelley's subsequent commentary that his answers to all three elements are "Yes." It's equally clear from the examples he supplied as support that he sees (or wants viewers to see) the problem as predominantly about the conduct of those on the right.


At NBC and Newsweek, it's still the late-1960s. The movie Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?, with its then-edgy portrayal of an engaged interracial couple visiting the white fiancee's parents, has recently debuted. Apparently the ink hasn't yet dried on the Supreme Court's Loving vs. Virginia decision, which nullified all remaining interracial marriage bans. What else can possibly explain the breathtakingly ignorant tweets emanating from those two media outlets acting as if America might not be ready for the idea that Rachel Lindsay, the first black woman in the history of The Bachelorette, might end up getting engaged to someone of another race?


TBS’s Angie Tribeca often takes a turn for the ridiculous when it comes to their plots, but the most recent episode seemed more willing to go for brutal when it came to oil tycoons. Namely, while murderers can be awful, the real monsters are oil moguls.


The finale to The CW's Supergirl was thankfully focused more on action than politics despite what its title "Nevertheless, She Persisted" would have us believe. However, the final episode of the politically-charged second season still could not avoid a few glaring missteps as it flies off into the summer.


Let’s face it, in the age of “woke” celebrities and ESPN talking heads, “shut up and sing” (or act, or catch the ball, etc.) is an increasingly unrealistic conservative ideal. Yes, many of us would love to be entertained without politics – right or left – intruding. But it ain’t gonna happen. 


The season may be almost over, but the CW’s Supergirl isn’t prepared to let go of its liberal bias, even at the end of the world. In the confusingly backwards minds of their writers, an administration like Trump's is as bad as an alien invasion to the point where a president hiding the fact that she's an alien is ok - so long as she's still a Democrat, of course.


Just before the Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) went live Monday night, The Washington Post reported that anonymous sources told them President Donald Trump shared classified intelligence with top Russian officials. All three of them rushed to the breaking story and led their programs with it. “Loose lips at the White House? Did the President reveal highly classified information to the Russians in the Oval Office,” speculated Anchor Scott Pelley during the opening tease for CBS Evening News. But they didn’t always care when classified intel was mishandled, Hillary Clinton was a prime example.


The show was bigoted, vile and unfunny. The characters were one-dimensional, the gags were as obvious as they were offensive, and the entire thing never rose above predictable anti-Catholic, pro-gay agitprop. The ratings were bad and even the critics didn’t care for it. So of course ABC went ahead with development and then gave The Real O’Neals a second season.