It costs a pretty penny to earn a diploma in stupid. The annual list price to attend Boston University -- including tuition, fees, room and board -- currently rounds out to $70,000. To acquire a degree in economics from this tony institution of higher learning, an undergrad must complete courses in calculus, microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis, empirical economics, statistics and assorted electives.



Tara Sullivan's Boston Globe story on the state of the NFL in July 2018 is a misery index, a litany of missteps by a league that can't get out of its own way. Conservatives and progressives can agree on several items on Sullivan's list, but other entries demonstrate the media bias one would expect from the intersection of progressive bias and the Globe.



The front page of Monday’s Boston Globe once again featured a hostile anti-Trump story by Annie Linskey, who saw racism in every turn of phrase and policy decision: “Trump's joy ride on a third rail: President turning caustic racial comments into policy.” Linskey showed no journalistic skepticism before tying every policy or idea Trump supports into one seamless racist garment.



The Boston Globe, which can make the New York Times look reasonable and moderate, pushed back ferociously against President Trump’s mockery of local hero Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, a potential Democratic rival to Trump in 2020, accusing the president in an online headline of woman-hating and racism. The front page of Saturday’s paper featured reporter Annie Linskey’s attack: “With attack on Warren, Trump pushes more buttons: Talk of DNA test, swipe at #MeToo push more buttons.” The online headline was much sharper: “Critics say Trump’s insults of Warren were a double scoop of misogyny, racism.”



On her 2:00 p.m. ET hour show on Monday, MSNBC anchor Katy Tur highlighted a controversial article in Sunday’s Boston Globe that compared enforcement of immigration law along the U.S. southern border to the Trail of Tears, a forced migration of Native Americans in the 1830s that caused many deaths.



Tuesday, MS-13 gang member Joel Martinez was sentenced to 40 years in prison for the murder of a 15 year-old boy from a rival gang. The Boston Globe reported on May 14 that Martinez "was captured on video bragging about the slaying." The Globe also noted that the killer's nickname is the singular version of the word President Donald Trump used two days later to describe MS-13 members. In its story on Martinez's sentencing, the Associated Press violated its own Stylebook guidance when it failed to note that Martinez is in the U.S. illegally.



Drew Cloud was a prolific writer specializing in student loan issues, founder of the Student Loan Report, and “a source for news on the student loan industry, financial aid, and scholarships.” Media relied on him for sensational surveys about student debt issues and quoted him often.

Except Cloud didn’t exist.



The Boston Globe's Ty Burr reviewed Chappaquiddick Tuesday, admonishing readers that the movie "might even be accurate." Burr claims that "I'll never know" what really happened the night Ted Kennedy drove off Chappaquiddick Island's Dike Road bridge and left Mary Jo Kopechne to die in his submerged car, "and neither will you." Besides, he insists, though Ted was "flawed but human," he had "endless accomplishments in the Senate."



The Boston Globe has published at least three reports about Bryon Hefner, the husband of now-former Massachusetts State Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, culminating today in coverage of Hefner's indictment on "multiple charges of sexual assault, criminal lewdness, and distributing nude photographs without consent." None of the stories reviewed directly tagged Rosenberg as a Democrat.



During Tuesday afternoon’s edition of CNN Newsroom, host Brooke Baldwin interviewed Boston Globe columnist Kevin Cullen, who recently published a column titled “What the Hell Happened to John Kelly?” In the column, Cullen explained that he initially supported the appointment of General John Kelly as White House Chief of Staff, making him the odd man out among his fellow columnists, but lost a lot of respect for him as a result of his tenure as Chief of Staff. 



The Boston Globe indulged in some early nostalgia for President Obama on the front of Sunday’s edition: “Gone But Still Growing On Us.” The online headline to Astead Herndon’s story: “Trump is making Obama great again.” Herndon used strict methodology to make his case for Obama's popularity: "On Twitter, Obama’s growth in popularity can be quantified. When he wished the country a Merry Christmas in his last year as president, the message was retweeted about 100,000 times." This is Sunday front-page news?



Former Massachusetts State Senator Brian Joyce was arrested a week ago and charged with accepting over $1 million in bribes. The story is getting very little coverage outside of New England, even though Joyce was quite creative in the forms of bribery he accepted, and even though Joyce's arrest continues long trend of corruption among Bay State Democratic Party legislative leaders and politicians.