Washington -- There is a new book out that bids fair to win this year's J. Gordon Coogler Award for The Worst Book of the Year, and remember, the year has just begun. The dreadful effort is "The Ones We've Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America." Its author is Charlotte Alter. The book takes its dreadful title from a dreadful speech given back in 2008 by presidential candidate Barack Obama, entitled, dreadfully enough, "The Ones We've Been Waiting For.



Amazon has decided to quietly crack down on books it deems offensive. But the company’s enforcement of standards seems lopsided at best. The New York Times reported that third-party booksellers on Amazon have been forbidden from selling copies of books written by David Duke, a former leader of the KKK, and George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party.



Big news on the...textbook front? The front page of Monday’s New York Times was dominated by the results of education reporter Dana Goldstein’s examination of differences between history textbooks approved for California students, and those given to students in Texas: “Two States. Eight Textbooks. Two American Stories.”  This paragraph was unintentionally revealing of the paper’s Bernie Sanders-style economics bias and obsession with “inequality”: "California’s curriculum materials, by contrast, sometimes read like a brief from a Bernie Sanders rally. 'The yawning gap between the haves and have-nots and what is to be done about it is one of the great questions of this time,' says the state’s 2016 social studies framework."



On the day after Christmas, The Washington Post Style section published an article on "6 books whose writers seemed to predict our reality." Once again, the Post definition of "reality" seems to be chemically altered or emotionally overwrought, claiming that somehow the Sinclair Lewis novel It Can't Happen Here is our "reality," when the book tells of a totalitarian state with no Congress or Supreme Court, concentration camps, and state-run media. 



An odd lead story choice for the New York Times National section Sunday: A fawning profile of the latest resistance leader...thriller author Richard North Patterson? “But nothing he has addressed in his novels, Mr. Patterson says, is as urgent or scary as the events taking place right now in real life. Now 72 years old, he has put thrillers behind him -- the high-wire stories set in courtrooms, in the White House, in countries torn by civil strife -- and embarked on something else entirely: writing about politics in the age of Donald J. Trump."



The New York Times is officially “triggered” by Donald Trump Jr.’s book of the same title somehow hitting #1 on the paper’s own best-seller list: “R.N.C. Spent Nearly $100,000 on Copies of Donald Trump Jr.’s Book." After years of controversy, the Times finally recognized problems with its best-seller lists -- but only when a book by Donald Trump Jr. claims the top spot. Alter and Confessore skip over the black-box nature of how the paper itself rigs its best-seller lists, which conservatives suspect with good reason to be stacked against conservative books and in favor of liberal ones.



In the aftermath of the guilty verdict for former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh (D) for sham book sales, New York Times editor Emily Eakin ran a slanted history of politicians who previously got into supposedly similar “book trouble.” (Meanwhile, Clintons and Obamas make multi-million dollar book deals with virtually no press scrutiny.)



New Yorker staff writer Andrew Marantz’s book “Antisocial – Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation” is a nearly 400-page episode of moral panic about right-wing, anti-Semitic extremists on the Internet, who he blames for ushering in the Age of Trump. The book itself actually doesn’t go as far as his October New York Times essay, “Free Speech Is Killing Us.” Yes, he means it literally, calling for regulation of hateful social media, which evidently directly caused recent ethnically motivated massacres. But it’s crammed with extraneous and dishonest attacks on conservative figures past and present.



In a press release and subsequent article by the arrogant and biased Philip Rucker of The Washington Post, it was announced with much fanfare among the liberal media and elites that the self-righteous anonymous White House official behind that infamous New York Times op-ed will soon release a book about being a member of The Resistance. Despite the fact that there’s no way for anyone other than The Times or the book publisher to vet them (plus the claims they’re leveling), the book will undoubtedly be celebrated as a modern-day Gospel by the liberal media.



Amidst the horrifying news that, according to Ronan Farrow’s new book Catch and Kill, then-NBC’s Today host Matt Lauer allegedly anally raped colleague Brooke Nevils in 2014, a look through the NewsBusters archives found Wednesday afternoon quite the ironic exchange in 2017 between Farrow and Lauer. On the October 11, 2017 edition of Today, Farrow discussed his piece for The New Yorker that blew the doors off Harvey Weinstein’s long, sordid history of allegedly abusing women. Just 49 days later, Lauer would be fired from NBC amidst the rise of the #MeToo era.



Washington Post book critic Ron Charles made a confession the other day. “I banned a book,” he wrote. “Or at least I helped get it banned, which makes Banned Books Week a little awkward for me this year. Like celebrating Arbor Day by cutting down a tree.”



It was not quite a year ago that the riveting hearing took place pitting the dueling testimonies of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford. New York Times reporter Robin Pogrebin parlayed her slanted reporting on the case and her Yale connection into a book deal with fellow reporter Kate Kelly. Both reporters contributed slanted anti-Kavanaugh reporting during the controversy, and retained the same tone for the book, The Education of Brett KavanaughAn Investigation.