Amidst the horrifying news that, according to Ronan Farrow’s new book Catch and Kill, then-NBC’s Today host Matt Lauer allegedly anally raped colleague Brooke Nevils in 2014, a look through the NewsBusters archives found Wednesday afternoon quite the ironic exchange in 2017 between Farrow and Lauer. On the October 11, 2017 edition of Today, Farrow discussed his piece for The New Yorker that blew the doors off Harvey Weinstein’s long, sordid history of allegedly abusing women. Just 49 days later, Lauer would be fired from NBC amidst the rise of the #MeToo era.



Washington Post book critic Ron Charles made a confession the other day. “I banned a book,” he wrote. “Or at least I helped get it banned, which makes Banned Books Week a little awkward for me this year. Like celebrating Arbor Day by cutting down a tree.”



It was not quite a year ago that the riveting hearing took place pitting the dueling testimonies of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford. New York Times reporter Robin Pogrebin parlayed her slanted reporting on the case and her Yale connection into a book deal with fellow reporter Kate Kelly. Both reporters contributed slanted anti-Kavanaugh reporting during the controversy, and retained the same tone for the book, The Education of Brett KavanaughAn Investigation.



It’s hard to compete with the crazy takes often expressed by hosts of The View, but on Friday, guest Margaret Atwood certainly came close. The author of the dystopian Handmaid’s Tale came to the show to talk about the Hulu adaptation of her book and her new sequel to the thirty-year-old aforementioned novel. While there, the Canadian author slammed the United States' abortion laws, even arguing that the government should pay for every woman’s house, food, clothing and medical bills, if they are “forced to give birth,” or more bluntly, forced to not kill their children.



Last week, Democrats held their first true presidential debate. With the field winnowed down to 10 candidates — three of them actual contenders for the nomination -- only one moment truly stood out. That moment came not from Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders but from a candidate desperate for attention: Beto O'Rourke. O'Rourke ran in 2018 for a Senate seat in Texas and lost in shockingly narrow fashion to incumbent Republican Sen. Ted Cruz. 



The latest anti-Kavanaugh hit job comes in book form: “The Education of Brett Kavanaugh: An Investigation,” by New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly. An excerpt appeared Sunday: “Brett Kavanaugh Fit In. She Did Not.” That “she” is Deborah Ramirez, whose uncorroborated sexual allegation against Kavanaugh (were part of the hearings frenzy. The reporters claim a new and damaging account involving Kavanaugh and a lewd act at a party. But there was also one staggering factual omission that once again suggested the New York Times still cares more about ruining Kavanaugh’s reputation than the pursuit of truth.



New York Times columnist Michelle Goldberg latest Trump-fearing packet of fury was promoted with a comic-book image that took up the entire front page of the Sunday Review: “The Changing Face Of Dystopia -- In the sequel to “The Handmaid’s Tale,” the truth saves. If only that still worked in real life.” Goldberg unashamedly conflated fiction and reality and saw the usual ominous parallels between Atwood’s fantasy and reality under President Trump.



Prolific horror fiction novelist Stephen King appeared on ABC’s The View, Wednesday to plug his newest book The Institute, about a group of teens with supernatural abilities who are kidnapped by a group of zealots, locked up and experimented on. While King claimed he left politics out of his stories, he connected the Trump administration “locking up kids in cages” as making his fictional novel, come to life.



Anthony Breznican interviewed the renowned horror novelist Stephen King for the New York Times: “Life Is Imitating Stephen King’s Art, and That Scares Him -- In his 61st novel, “The Institute,” children with supernatural abilities are taken from their parents and incarcerated. Sound familiar?” In case that subhead wasn’t obvious enough, the Times is referring to Trump “locking kids up.” King spouted: “All I can say is that I wrote it in the Trump era. I’ve felt more and more a sense that people who are weak, and people who are disenfranchised and people who aren’t the standard, white American, are being marginalized."



Conservatives have repeatedly protested how The New York Times "Bestseller List" doesn't live up to its name. The newest example came from Sean Davis of The Federalist, and the book in question is Justice On Trial by Mollie Hemingway (of The Federalist) and Carrie Severino. The book about the Kavanaugh confirmation shot to #1 on Amazon, but the Times was playing games....again.



Novelist John Irving heaved up “The Anti-Abortion Crusade’s Cruel History” onto the op-ed page of Monday’s New York Times. The text box provided this melodramatic slander: “Abortion opponents don’t care about an unwanted child or the mother.” That smear is repeated in Irving’s text. That tired bit of abuse skips a rather obvious point: That keeping the child from being killed is certainly an excellent start toward “caring” for it, as opposed to aborting it. While it’s not a perfect corollary between pro-life and pro-choice, studies indicate that “red states” residents are more generous givers than those of “blue states.”



Something fascinating happened in The New York Times Book Review on Sunday. They offered five separate reviews of books by "conservatives," even as they continued to ignore the number-one nonfiction book at the top of their own Best Sellers list: Unfreedom of the Press by Mark Levin.