New York Times book critic Dwight Garner had some modest praise for Fear, Watergate journalist Bob Woodward’s new peek at Donald Trump’s White House, but the main thrust of his review was Trump-bashing. The text box summed up Garner’s contemptuous take on Trump as a leader and human: “‘Fear’ portrays Donald J. Trump as a president displaying little knowledge and an utter lack of interest in learning anything at all.” And in his review of John Kerry's book, Garner floated a liberal conspiracy theory about the Ohio vote in 2004 that not even the Democratic Party signed on to.



Yes, that headline is real. In covering the effort by over 350 newspapers to collude against President Trump, Wednesday’s Hardball featured MSNBC host Chris Matthews alluding to Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in the segment promoting the anti-Trump collusion campaign started by The Boston Globe.



NPR and other liberal networks fail to acknowledge how their "robust critical discourse" about Trump wasn't there when Obama was president. On Saturday night's All Things Considered, the taxpayer-funded network promoted a murder mystery starring the heroes....Barack Obama and Joe Biden. They acted like everyone would love this "fun newbook." The cheerful, overly familiar online headline was "Barack and Joe Solve a Murder Mystery."



For years, Michiko Kakutani was the most feared and revered New York Times book critic. Now the reviewer becomes the reviewed with her new book with a self-explanatory title: The Death of Truth – Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump. On the plus side, it’s short. Yet this slim, 173-page undersized hardback still manages to be a slow read, dense and repetitive. The widely read Kakutani uses boringly familiar quotes from predictable wells of anti-totalitarian wisdom like Hannah Arendt and George Orwell to attack Trump and the new GOP for abandoning truth, reason, even common decency.



CNN news anchor Jake Tapper is getting his Afghani war book turned into a Hollywood action flick with major tinseltown leading men signing on for the action. On Thursday, The Hollywood Reporter broke the news that several actors have been selected for the onscreen adaptation of The Outpost. The cast includes a few big names such as Orlando Bloom and Scott Eastwood, as well as up-and-coming Sharper Objects star, Taylor John Smith.

 


New York Times reporter Nellie Bowles devoted a 3,400-word attack on Jordan Peterson, the Canadian psychologist, professor, YouTube lecture star, and author of the runaway best-seller 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, who has become Public Enemy No. 1 for the intersectional left. The headline gave away Bowles’ dishonest take: “Jordan Peterson, Custodian of the Patriarchy -- He says there’s a crisis in masculinity. Why won’t women -- all these wives and witches -- just behave?” Ben Shapiro didn’t mince words in his takedown: "The piece is tailored to Bowles’ message: Peterson is a horrifying misogynist."



Rolling Stone’s Tessa Stuart interviewed New York Times campaign reporter Amy Chozick about her new book on covering the Hillary Clinton campaign, and revealed Chozick to be amazingly forgiving of Clinton and quite uncaring about female victims of male predation – at least those whose stories could conceivably hurt Hillary’s chances. And she again apologized about her paper actually covering campaign news -- the leaked emails from the Clinton team.



It turns out that the uncanny ability to make people from all sides of the political spectrum hate you is a comic book-worthy superpower. The former FBI director will be starring in a gritty, true-crime graphic novel, titled “Political Power: James Comey.”



On Friday's Tucker Carlson Tonight, radio host and author Dennis Prager explained that the "best seller list" in The New York Times isn't real, because it excludes conservative and religious books it doesn't like, despite the obvious facts that other book-sales lists in the industry include them. Prager cited his new best-seller The Rational Bible: Exodus. 



GQ magazine attracted controversy with a pseudo-irreverent, provocative list in its May issue, "21 Books You Don't Have to Read Before You Die." The overarching tone is an ideology-first assault against the dreaded oeuvre of Dead (Racist/Sexist) White Males, with GQ gleefully ripping the reputation of books unjustly bolstered in the Western canon by white privilege, as a review of the piece in Entertainment Weekly made clear. GQ's introduction set the juvenile, hectoring tone: "Some are racist and some are sexist, but most are just really, really boring..."



The release of former FBI director James Comey’s book coaxed Michiko Kakutani, the New York Times’s former, famously influential chief book critic out of retirement and, unusually, into the news pages of Friday’s edition: “James Comey Has a Story to Tell. It’s Very Persuasive.” Kakutani was given over 2,000 words and a full news page to offer praise for A Higher Loyalty -- Truth, Lies, And Leadership, though the book evidently has no bombshell news to offer. While other outlets questioned Comey's personal insults of Trump, the only criticism Kakutani managed was about the damage Comey purportedly did to Hillary Clinton’s campaign.



Washington Post book critic Ron Charles unleashed on the "toxic waste" of America's "deadly gun culture" in reviewing three liberal novels on Wednesday. The headline was "Drawing a bead on America's gun culture."