The New York Review of Books February 22 issue prominently displayed journalist Michael Tomasky’s blessing of two virulently anti-Trump books, Michael Wolff’s infamous Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, and the anti-conservative jeremiad Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republican by David Frum. The NYRB’s cover teaser read “Fire in the White House.” The review's title was “The Worst of the Worst.” Tomasky warned of the danger of Trump’s “incitement of private violence to radicalize supporters.”


Having lost an election they thought they would win and unable to get over it; having been staggeringly wrong about their predictions that a Trump presidency would be the end of global economies; now putting faith in a special counsel to bring down the president with evidence that looks increasingly dubious, the left has taken refuge in the only shelter available to them: the president is off his rocker, mad, crazy, unstable and therefore the 25th Amendment must be invoked and Trump removed from office.


New York Times Katie Rogers, a political reporter who specializes in anti-journalistic fan notes to prominent Democrats like Hillary and Chelsea Clinton, had former President Barack Obama in her sights in a long piece in Friday’s paper. It's a tribute to a new liberal icon, the former president’s official photographer, Pete Souza, who is selling a coffee-table book of photos of the president: “He Captured Obama’s Presidency. Now He Helps People Remember It.” This is news?


Entertainment Weekly is making another ill-advised dip into politics in its November 10 issue, hailing the apparent new trend of “woke” romance novels: “Love Trumps All -- Across social media and in their work, artists are reacting to the current political climate. But none are doing it as swiftly -- or forcefully -- as romance-novel writers.” it featured a silly graphic of a set of romance paperbacks topped with a pink “pussy hat.”


New York Times reporter Dan Bilefsky devoted a long review-interview in Saturday Arts to left-wing British journalist Jonathan Freedland’s novel about the assassinating of a president, “Trump Is Stranger Than Fiction.” He dutifully passed along the suggestion that such assassination porn was inevitable “when the top guy in the White House appears to be recklessly lurching toward global destruction....” Bilefsky, a foreign reporter for the paper, has previously blamed Brexit for hate crimes, but betrays no concern that this novel may provoke in similar fashion, and registers nothing objectionable about the epidemic of imagined presidential assassinations among liberal "artists."


Radical black author Ta-Nehisi Coates, who regularly calls President Trump a white supremacist and has displayed a callous attitude toward 9-11 first responders, was rewarded with prominent placement on the front of Saturday’s New York Times arts page in a laudatory interview with Books section staff writer Concepcion De Leon: “An Intellectual’s Journey.” The subhead gave no hint of any controversy around Coates: “With a new book on the Obama presidency and its aftermath, Ta-Nehisi Coates learns to accept the fame he never sought.”


Unprofessional all around: The decision by the New York Times Sunday Book Review to publish a laudatory review of “Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America. At this point, the grievous flaws flushed out by critics on the left and right should have required that any review come with a warning label. Yet even months after criticism from outlets across the political spectrum, the Times still ran a review by Heather Boushey of Duke professor Nancy MacLean’s deceitful history of the free-market movement, Nobel-winning “public choice” economist James Buchanan, with the Koch Brothers standing in as modern-day Enemy No. 1 in the left’s fevered imaginings. The online headline: “How the Radical Right Played the Long Game and Won.”


The Washington Examiner’s Paul Bedard had a Friday morning piece that called out The New York Times for “diss-mot[ing]” conservative talk radio host Mark Levin’s new book Rediscovering Americanism: And the Tyranny of Progressivism from the number one spot on their secret bestseller list.


Entertainment Weekly magazine, once known for its pop culture reviews, now more for its feminist grandstanding, stuffed its summer double issue of July 21/28 with bits and bobs of chic liberal activism, particularly of the feminist variety. The News & Notes section was particularly political: “Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman is the hero we deserve and the hero we need -- a fearless female walking tall through a literal No Man’s Land, a symbol of resilience in an era of so many sexist talking heads and internet trolls.”


Handmaid’s Tale protests are becoming more and more prevalent around the world – and the liberal media are loving it. Advocating so-called “women’s rights,” these protesters declare defunding Planned Parenthood is the equivalent of Margaret Atwood’s 1980’s dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale. The novel – now a media-beloved Hulu show – occurs in a dystopian, misogynist world in which women are valued only for their fertility and are forced to bear children for the upper class.


National Public Radio is living up to its brand as a taxpayer-funded sandbox for leftists with a new online feature on the NPREd blog headlined “Summer Reading For Your Woke Kid.”

Kayla Lattimore began by celebrating children’s author Innosanto Nagara, who wanted a "woke" two-year-old and NPR can hook you up with "social change" radicals: 


The most recent episode of Netflix’s Chelsea titled “Scientologists and Pirates and Aliens, Oh My!” aired on Friday, May 19th. Expanding on the usual bashing of President Trump, this show featured a vicious attack on Ivanka Trump.