Washington Post nonfiction book critic Carlos Lozada underlined how well he matches his paper's red-hot hatred of the current president in his list of the "most memorable books I read in 2018." Cable-news personalities made the list, both good (CNN's Amanda Carpenter) and bad (Fox host Jeanine Pirro). 



Saturday’s New York Times featured unhidden, extraneous hostility toward the president’s reading habits, in a snarky story more fitting to Sunday Styles or the opinion section then the news section. In “Books Trump Can Praise Without Reading a Word,” Katie Rogers quickly termed pro-Trump books from the likes of Jeanine Pirro and Gregg Jarrett to be “conspiracy theory.”  It marks a 180 degree tilt from how the paper regularly praised President Barack Obama for... reading.



Under the headline "Fury roared and Fear shook us," The Washington Post published a list of the Best Books of 2018, in the apparent "year of the presidential expose." There is no "year of the presidential expose" when an Obama or Clinton is in the White House. As usual, the WashPost threw a bunch of its own past and current writers in the Top 50 Nonfiction category.



Jazz Shaw at Hot Air pointed out that New York Times book reviewer Jennifer Senior is trying to attract attention by retracting her book reviews. (Now, she's a columnist.) Her article is headlined "I Take Back My Praise of Jeff Flake's Book." 



Writing in an expansive piece entitled “The Eruption” for the Outlook section of Sunday’s Washington Post, non-fiction book critic Carlos Lozada compared Trump voters to “military units,” “cancer cells,” and even “explosives” because they have all been “activated” with Trump voters being “activated” as bigots running roughshod over American politics.



On a day when pipe bombs were sent by an unknown party to Democratic politicians and mainstream media outlets, with the press presuming Trump and his supporters guilty of the crimes by association, thriller author Zoe Sharp proudly tweeted a Trump assassination fantasy short story that’s been published in a special section of the New York Times.



New York Times editors must have thought Alexandra Alter’s article a timely response to conservative Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation: “How Feminist Dystopian Fiction Is Channeling Women’s Anger and Anxiety.” They even placed it on Wednesday's front page. Thanks to President Trump’s attacks on women’s rights America’s, women are just a few weeks away from mandatory Handmaid’s Tale uniforms, judging by this ominous overview of recent novels in the genre.



New York Times book critic Dwight Garner had some modest praise for Fear, Watergate journalist Bob Woodward’s new peek at Donald Trump’s White House, but the main thrust of his review was Trump-bashing. The text box summed up Garner’s contemptuous take on Trump as a leader and human: “‘Fear’ portrays Donald J. Trump as a president displaying little knowledge and an utter lack of interest in learning anything at all.” And in his review of John Kerry's book, Garner floated a liberal conspiracy theory about the Ohio vote in 2004 that not even the Democratic Party signed on to.



Yes, that headline is real. In covering the effort by over 350 newspapers to collude against President Trump, Wednesday’s Hardball featured MSNBC host Chris Matthews alluding to Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in the segment promoting the anti-Trump collusion campaign started by The Boston Globe.



NPR and other liberal networks fail to acknowledge how their "robust critical discourse" about Trump wasn't there when Obama was president. On Saturday night's All Things Considered, the taxpayer-funded network promoted a murder mystery starring the heroes....Barack Obama and Joe Biden. They acted like everyone would love this "fun newbook." The cheerful, overly familiar online headline was "Barack and Joe Solve a Murder Mystery."



For years, Michiko Kakutani was the most feared and revered New York Times book critic. Now the reviewer becomes the reviewed with her new book with a self-explanatory title: The Death of Truth – Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump. On the plus side, it’s short. Yet this slim, 173-page undersized hardback still manages to be a slow read, dense and repetitive. The widely read Kakutani uses boringly familiar quotes from predictable wells of anti-totalitarian wisdom like Hannah Arendt and George Orwell to attack Trump and the new GOP for abandoning truth, reason, even common decency.



CNN news anchor Jake Tapper is getting his Afghani war book turned into a Hollywood action flick with major tinseltown leading men signing on for the action. On Thursday, The Hollywood Reporter broke the news that several actors have been selected for the onscreen adaptation of The Outpost. The cast includes a few big names such as Orlando Bloom and Scott Eastwood, as well as up-and-coming Sharper Objects star, Taylor John Smith.