An NFL season marred by player protests disrespecting veterans and police officers, leading to a damaging loss of public approval for the league, ended Sunday with the Take a Knee and Black Lives Matter movements royally embarrassed themselves outside the Super Bowl in Minneapolis. Protesters, encouraged by progressive media, blocked an entrance at US Bank Stadium and a rail line nearby. Seventeen people were arrested for impeding Super Bowl ticket holders from getting to the game by train.


At the New York Times, Wednesday's print edition version of Adam Goldman's and Matt Apuzzo's story on Deputy Director Andrew McCabe's departure from the FBI claims he "abruptly stepped down ... after months of withering criticism from President Trump ... (and) pressure from the head of the bureau ..." That isn't where the Times started when news of McCabe's departure first broke Tuesday. None of the story's original or six subsequent iterations seen at NewDiffs.org mention the "insurance policy" controversy which has tarnished McCabe's tenure.


There's a war on plastic straws. Its proponents are demanding that restaurants not offer them unless requested, with criminal penalties for violations. Some jurisdictions have enacted outright bans. The basis for the movement is research done in 2011 by Milo Cress, then 9 years old. Seriously.


On January 11, Nancy Pelosi slammed as "crumbs" the wage increases and bonuses well over 100 companies had announced at that point after the new tax law's passage in December. Thursday, she went to the same well more stridently. The establishment press, including the Associated Press, still won't report Pelosi's and others' similar comments, because they know how toxic they are.


On Thursday, USA Today headlined the possibility, with an accompanying video, that President Donald Trump might "be giving a speech to a empty room in Davos" on Friday. It didn't work out that way.


At the Politico on Wednesday, Dan Diamond and Jennifer Haberkorn tried to portray a plan by the federal governments HHS to increase health workers' conscience protections as something vaguely sinister. In the process, they completely misstated the history of what they called "so-called conscience protections," and dishonestly whined that HHS's plan to enforce existing law is "a significant shift for the (HHS's Civil Rights) office."


Free speech, free expression, and the simple right to go about your business without being subjected to attempts at brainwashing or the equivalent of a political inquisition have been under attack for years at colleges and universities, and more recently in the workplace. Most Americans don't appreciate the seriousness of the threats because, as Tucker Carlson explained in his opening monologue on Wednesday, the press rarely covers them — and when they do, they usually side with the oppressors.


The Department of Justice announced Friday that Rene Boucher, the person who attacked and seriously injured Kentucky GOP Senator Rand Paul 2-1/2 months ago, has been charged with a federal felony and admitted to the attack. Several press accounts are crowing that the DOJ's announcement proves that the attack was not politically motivated. It does no such thing.


The Daily Caller's Eric Lieberman reported early Friday afternoon that Google is discontinuing (for now) its "fact-check" feature. The company is now characterizing the effort, which the Daily Caller exposed as a thinly veiled attempt to target conservative sites while leaving leftists alone, as an "experiment" which has been put "on hold," while the its engineers see, in Lieberman's words, "how they can vastly improve a fact-check system."


On Monday, Valerie Richardson at the Washington Times noted that no teams with players who continued to kneel during the National Anthem before National Football League games until the end of the regular season qualified for the playoffs. A sports psychologist sees a potentially important lesson in this result, while NBC, which has promised to showcase kneeling players during the Anthem before the beginning of this year's Super Bowl, may be destined for disappointment.


Reporters continue to concoct reasons to complain as more than 2 million American individuals and their families have suddenly become better off than they were three weeks ago. Even the news that the nation's largest retailer is raising its nationwide minimum wage while paying bonuses of up to $1,000 to every employee, and that an automaker is investing $1 billion in U.S. production, haven't moved cynics who refuse to concede the unconditional positivity in all of this.


The City of Seattle probably didn't expect pushback from Costco, seen by many on the left as retail's "anti-Walmart," after its "sugary drink" tax of 1.75 cents per ounce went into effect January 1. But that is exactly what has happened. In moves the national press, which largely supports such taxes, has thus far ignored, Costco is itemizing the built-in cost of the tax on its Seattle store's shelf tags, and informing customers that they won't pay the tax if they shop at one of two other Costco stores outside Seattle's city limits.