Reporters often get basic facts wrong and otherwise embarrass themselves when attempting to explain specifics about guns. This is what happened to Pete Williams at MSNBC Friday morning as he tried to describe shotguns in the aftermath of Thursday's Capital Gazette massacre in Annapolis, Maryland.



Saturday's New York Times story on President Donald Trump's popularity reads like a tortured liberal's lament. Jeremy Peters is astonished that Trump's support in the Republican Party has grown, and doesn't understand the "protective" reaction to the unhinged attacks on him. The Times reporter also overstated the significance of a tiny drop in reported GOP affiliation in Gallup's long-running poll while ignoring a significant shift in GOP-leaning tendencies among independents.



Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson announced Tuesday that the nation's number 3 fast-food outlet (by number of locations) is closing 150 U.S. stores. It's not difficult to read Johnson's comments as indicating that the shuttered stores will primarily be in "blue" or liberal sections of the U.S. At the same time, he has specifically targeted "middle America and the South" for expansion. The business press isn't even trying to make the obvious connection between Johnson's announcement and the respective presence or absence of high minimum-wage laws and excessive regulation.



Thursday's Inspector General's report reviewing FBI and Department of Justice actions before the 2016 election effectively concluded that former President Barack Obama lied to the American people and committed illegal acts in emailing then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's private-server email addresses. The IG also found that former FBI Director James Comey scrubbed all hints of Obama's prior knowledge from his July 2016 statement explaining why Mrs. Clinton would not be indicted for her illegal acts. 



On Monday, columnist James Freeman at the Wall Street Journal's "Best of the Web" noted the selective memories seen in the vast majority of the press over President Donald Trump's relatively noncommittal but nonetheless protocol-breaking tweet an hour before Friday morning's upcoming jobs report. Many of them had a serious case of the vapors, but didn't recall three instances when former President Barack Obama did the same thing during his presidency, with as much or more specificity.



There isn't enough room in a single post for all of the contempt and ridicule NBC's latest hiring move deserves. The PR department at its MSNBC cable outlet waited until early Saturday morning to tweet its announcement that Ben Rhodes, the Obama administration's Deputy National Strategic Advisor for Strategic Communications, would be joining both NBC and MSNBC as a "Political Contributor." Who knew that systematically misleading and ridiculing the press while in office in the name of selling the fatally flawed Iran nuclear "deal" would be a resumé enhancer?



If the folks at the New York Times are capable of being embarrassed over their errors, the one President Donald Trump decisively exposed Friday would lead to a lot of red faces at the Old Gray Lady. Don't count on it. A week ago, the paper falsely reported that an administration spokesperson had said that holding the U.S-Korea summit in Singapore on its originally planned date of June 12 would be impossible. That spokesperson did not say that, and an audio recording proved it. Friday afternoon, Trump announced that the U.S.-Korea summit in Singapore is on — for, yes, June 12.



Friday evening, Fox News's Martha MacCallum interviewed Washington Examiner chief political correspondent Byron York. In that interview's second half, the pair discussed new information which contradicts key contentions about "How the (Trump)-Russia inquiry began" made in a December New York Times story. That story claimed that the investigation began as a result of a May 2016 "heavy drinking" meeting between low-level Donald Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos and Alexander Downer, Australia's top diplomat in Great Britain.



Figures for the May ratings period show that CNN's primetime audience shrank by 25 percent from May 2017. So it seems that obsessing over Stormy Daniels, having over 147 interviews with her lawyer, constantly going after President Donald Trump as an idiot and a racist, highlighting Jim Acosta's loutish behavior, giving an open mic to gun-controllers, and siding with Hamas terrorists attacking Israeli soldiers — only a few items from a much longer list — is not a winning formula. Imagine that.



Tuesday evening (for Wednesday's print edition), New York Times reporter Julie Hirschfeld Davis, covering President Donald Trump's rally in Nashville, Tennessee, reported that it attracted "about 1,000" attendees. The Times issued a correction on Wednesday, stating that "the fire marshal’s office estimated that approximately 5,500 people attended the rally." So the crowd was 5-1/2 times larger than originally reported. How can that happen?



On Maria Bartiromo's Wednesday morning Fox Business Network show, the host asked Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson to respond a Tuesday Washington Examiner op-ed by Alveda King, a longtime pro-life activist and niece of Martin Luther King Jr. King contended that if Starbucks is "really serious about eliminating racism," it will "stop funding" Planned Parenthood.



In one of the more bizarre self-awareness fails ever, leftist activists and politicians have taken to Twitter to denounce conditions unaccompanied illegal-immigrant minors face at federal detention centers. They're contending that the photos involved reflect conditions existing now during President Donald Trump's administration. There's one "little" problem: The photos involved are from a 2014 Arizona Republic story, i.e., they're from the Obama era. Even an item published Friday at the Washington Post uses two of those 2014 photos. It's a fake-news feast.