Al Gore was just one of the climate alarmists to link a recent iceberg calving to “the climate crisis.” The Guardian blamed climate change even before the massive iceberg A-68 broke off from the Larsen C ice shelf.

Gore tweeted “The Larsen C ice shelf has broken away from Antarctica, a jarring reminder of why we must solve the climate crisis” on July 12. Scientists studying the ice shelf said the opposite.


While discussing the potential impact of President Trump’s Middle Eastern visit on Monday’s edition of Morning Joe, BBC World News anchor Katty Kay created controversy within the panel when she fretted that the commander-in-chief was "alienating" Iran while visiting Saudi Arabia and Israeli. She even laughably declared that Iran was a "potentially" "pro-American nation."


You probably don’t want to go to actor Jordan Gavaris for geo-political advice. The star of BBC America’s Orphan Black spouted off on Islam, terrorism and the attack on London. He also managed to bash Donald Trump as a “tyrannical fascist.” 


On Thursday, President Donald Trump held a marathon press conference, covering a whole host of topics. Both during and afterward, the media meltdowns were palpable. On both social media and television, they lamented the President’s repeated attacks on their negative coverage of his administration and what he deemed to be fake news as a result of their “level of dishonesty” that’s “out of control.”


Every year, the media promotes an annual study put out by the The Southern Poverty Law Center, a left wing organization devoted to “monitoring” hate groups and crimes across the U.S, despite provoking it’s own hate crime against a conservative organization in 2012. The group has a cozy relationship with the media, with its president Richard Cohen frequently appearing on news programs to promote his group’s “studies,” even though the group in no way actually vets or verifies any of the alleged incidents.


Thursday evening, Venezuela's Bolivarian Socialist government arbitrarily suspended the recall effort against "President" Nicolas Maduro, demonstrating beyond any doubt that the South American country now functions as a dictatorship. Given its gravity, this news, described in coverage at the Wall Street Journal as "a crisis of democracy," is not getting the visibility it should be receiving.


Gee, maybe at times entertainers prefer to talk about entertainment rather than politics. It seems that a BBC interviewer could have learned that lesson in a rather embarrassing way when he interviewed Lady Gaga and proceeded to ask her about the U.S. presidential race. As you can see below, Lady Gaga was rather reluctant to provide answers as the interviewer was forced to wait through long painful silences. The UK Daily Mail chronicled the pain endured by the interviewer Charlie Stayt:


The British Broadcasting Corporation announced on Monday that former MSNBC host Martin Bashir has been hired to serve as the network's new religious affairs correspondent. The news release referred to Bashir as an “award-winning journalist” who has conducted “high-profile interviews" as well as “making ground-breaking, landmark documentaries.”

Of course, there was no mention of the incident during November of 2013, when he made a disgraceful rant regarding former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, whom he called “America’s resident dunce” and claimed she has a “deceased mind.” He then went so far as to suggest that someone should defecate in her mouth and urinate in her eyes.


While a meme comparing both presidential candidates to Harry Potter villains is going viral, the media only cares about demonizing one candidate. After the popular book series’ author J.K. Rowling called Donald Trump, worse than Voldemort, the media have been eagerly trying to get Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe to bash Trump as well.


The same day Hillary Clinton will face off against Donald Trump in the first presidential debate, more than 300 economists blasted Hillary Clinton’s economic agenda in The Hill.

 

It was a nightmare for the BBC, as they described it: "An interview by BBC reporter Catrin Nye on Islamophobia has been interrupted by Islamophobia." A passer-by named Paul told Nye’s interviewee Ruqaiya Haris, a Muslim advocate and student: "There's no Sharia law here." Haris wasn’t going to take the interruption sitting down.

But it's a bit funny when the the taxpayer-funded BBC objects to an opposing point of view forcing its way into their tilted conversation.


They should have known better, but it was apparently too good to check. Following the lead of the apparently shellshocked BBC, the Associated Press on Friday night included an item in its "The Latest" timeline on Great Britain's Thursday vote to leave the European Union about how "So many users are signing a petition for a re-run of Britain's referendum on European Union membership that they've crashed the House of Commons website hosting the document."

Then, for good measure, the wire service devoted a separate stand-alone report on the petition's attainment of "more than 1.6 million names" as "a measure of the extraordinary divisiveness of Thursday's vote to leave the 28-nation bloc." Sunday, the eponymously named Louise Mensch at the news, opinion, and commentary website Heat Street exposed the petition effort as a prank (HT Instapundit; bolds are mine throughout this post):