The press has mostly gone off the rails in covering President Trump's proposal to rescind $15 billion in unspent funds, insisting on characterizing the move as "cuts." The competition for the worst coverage is fierce, but Andrew Taylor's story at the Associated Press, as carried at the Washington Post, probably wins the prize for the most incoherent headline: "Administration proposes cutting $15 billion in unused funds."



After the horrific mass murder of churchgoers in Texas this past Sunday, the media was ready and set to blame guns and gun owners, yet again for the unconscionable violence. But it wasn’t just journalists penning their politically-driven tirades, it was also their paper’s cartoonists too.



Imagine if a candidate during a debate makes a statement so outright erroneous that the debate moderator takes time to fact check him with the truth. A very notable moment you might say. Well, not according to a couple of liberal newspapers, including a local one, who again acted as information cloaking devices by not mentioning the debate moderator correction. This was the case in the June 8 debate between Karen Handel and Jon Ossoff, candidates in the Georgia 6th Congressional District special election. 



Candidate struck dumb by opponent's question. Would that not strike you as a dramatic moment in a political debate? You probably would agree and so do most media outlets that reported on the June 6 debate between Karen Handel and Jon Ossoff running in the June 20 special election for Georgia's 6th Congressional District. In fact many reports headlined the moment that Ossoff was asked by Handel who he would vote for in that election. Mediaite was among the outlets that featured that debate moment by observing that "Karen Handel Silences Jon Ossoff With One Simple Question During Congressional Debate":



On Friday, Georgia Congressman John Lewis, whose 5th District includes the City of Atlanta, said of Donald Trump that "I don’t see the president-elect as a legitimate president." Trump characteristically fired back with a two-part tweet firing back at Lewis. As would be expected, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution rushed to Lewis's defense. In its apparent haste to do so, a pair of journalists at the paper committed a colossal math blunder which vastly understated the city's crime rate, making the city look over 13 times safer than it really is.



In Congressional testimony on Monday and Tuesday, Planned Parenthood head Cecile Richards twisted or failed to tell the truth in several instances.

As shown last night, one of them related to how many of its facilities are involved in the provision of fetal tissue for compensation. Her claim that it's "less than 1 percent" is only plausible if the organization has recently terminated such involvement at many facilities known to have participated in the practice in the recent past. A second more obviously untrue claim, whose falsehood has been completely ignored by the national establishment press, is her contention that "we've never stated" that Planned Parenthood performs mammograms at any of its facilities. Well, yes she has — and as will be seen later, an awful lot of people who you might think would know better still believe the lie.



When the government pushes to destroy America’s biggest source of energy, you can certainly trust the media to jump on board.

On June 1, the Environmental Protection Agency unveiled drastic new limits on carbon emissions, mandating steep emission cuts within 16 years. It’s a move that may cost  hundreds of thousands of jobs each year, but only 13 of the 20 major United States newspapers discussed the issue in editorials. Eleven of those papers actually promoted the new regulations with editorials or official endorsements – from their editorial board.



Of all the soft-cushion drubbings Barack Obama has taken at the hands of once (and future) cheerleaders, none is as silly as an op-ed by Cynthia Tucker of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The piece is titled “Obama will have to take his lumps,” but the context suggests Tucker is using the metaphor in the sense of “one lump or two?”

Her argument, if it can be rightly called that, might be encapsulated as “Sure, Obama lied, but only after those conniving Republicans sabotaged his undeniably excellent health care reform law, thereby forcing his hand.”



Let’s look at the way the print media reacted to Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis after their first six months as pontiff.
 
We looked at the editorials in 15 of the nation’s largest newspapers to see what they said about the current pope, and his predecessor, after their first six months in office (Pope Francis will celebrate his first six months on September 13).



Saturday's front-page New York Times story by education writer Michael Winerip on a school testing scandal involving Beverly Hall, former superintendent of Atlanta public schools: "35 Indicted in Test Scandal at Atlanta Schools." Hall is "charged with racketeering, theft, influencing witnesses, conspiracy and making false statements. Prosecutors recommended a $7.5 million bond for her; she could face up to 45 years in prison."

It's a sorry end to a saga that includes politically correct embarrassment for the paper and reporter Shaila Dewan, who defended Hall in two notorious stories from August 2010, trumpeting the false initial vindication of Superintendent Hall, who is black, while hinting at a racial element to criticism that Hall and the Atlanta school district had falsified minority student test scores.



Chalk another one up for media anti-Catholic bigotry.

Syndicated editorial cartoonist Mike Luckovich, working for the Atlanta-Journal Constitution, created a cartoon bashing the Catholic Church for controlling women. The cartoon features a wizened old bishop in a confessional, saying to a woman that “The contraception debate’s about controlling you.” The cartoon has the caption “Confession” at the bottom. 



On Monday, the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Clear English -- oops, the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) -- touted how they had corrected "transphobic" language in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The original version, they claimed, "unfortunately used outdated and inaccurate pronouns." Here's what makes it complicated. The center of the story, 7-year-old "D," insists she is a boy. Her "father" gave birth to her...from her uterus. So the "corrected" story reads like this: