During Sunday’s edition of Reliable Sources, the panel engaged in quite a bit of hyperbole when reacting to the latest developments in the Mueller investigation. Baltimore Sun Media Critic David Zurawik likened the Trump v. Mueller narrative, which he described as “a man of rectitude who believes in the rule of law versus a man who will say anything, who scorns law,” to a “battle for our national souls.” Never-Trumper David Frum, a staff writer for The Atlantic, pushed back on the idea that journalists cover President Trump too much, claiming that the President “has the potential to organized human life on this planet in seven minutes” and describing him as “one of three human beings on Earth who has the power to end life on this planet,” referring to the United States’ possession of nuclear weapons. Frum continued: “if there’s evidence that this person is mentally unstable or a criminal, that’s really newsworthy.”



Not long after it was announced that former President George H.W. Bush had passed away late Friday night in Houston, Texas, the Associated Press came out with a smug obituary by recently-retired correspondent Michael Graczyk that began this way: “George H.W. Bush, a patrician New Englander whose presidency soared with the coalition victory over Iraq in Kuwait, but then plummeted in the throes of a weak economy that led voters to turn him out of office after a single term, has died. He was 94.”



SHOW ME THE NUMBERS!!!

A reader of Wednesday's Associated Press story by Nicolas Riccardi about the tight U.S. Senate race in Arizona between Martha McSally and Kyrsten Sinema could be forgiven for channeling his inner Jerry Maguire. Why? Because in a long story filed at 6:04 A.M. (with later update) about that race, there were no numbers provided.



This year, with Republicans in control of the White House, House and Senate, journalists are actively electioneering on behalf of Democrats, as a way to put a check on the power of President Trump. But eight years ago, when Democrats held both the House and Senate going into President Obama’s first midterm elections, the media were distressed that liberal power might be diluted, and upset that voters failed to appreciate the tremendous “victories” and “amazing legislative agenda” that Obama and the Democrats had accomplished.



When does the Associated Press consider an opinion piece on immigration to be straight news? According to an article posted on Tuesday morning, it’s apparently whenever it provides a chance to attack President Trump as “making another hardline immigration play” while “seeking to energize his supporters and help Republicans keep control of Congress.”



The White House held a rare press briefing on Monday and so many in the liberal media used the occasion to falsely assert to Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders that they’re not blaming the President and/or his supporters for the mail bomber or the Pittsburgh synagogue shooter when they’ve been doing just that. Monday’s briefing featured many of the familiar faces who readers and viewers have come to expect to make a scene under the guise of accountability and thirst for the truth.



With the liberal media unable to vocalize on camera their spin while Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was testifying Thursday afternoon, many took to Twitter to voice their displeasure with the “Angry Kavanaugh,” calling him a “belittled marginalized white man” who, based on his summer of lifting weights, assaulted Dr. Christine Blasey Ford.



Even before accuser Christine Blasey Ford finished testifying on Thursday in Washington, D.C., about sexual assault charges against Judge Brett Kavanaugh, a reporter with the Associated Press found a way to kill the time while waiting for something significant to happen. Reporter Calvin Woodward wrote an article asking AP readers: “Will the Kavanaugh-Ford Hearing Be a Where-Were-You Moment?”



Remember when liberals in the media disdained everything about the Catholic Church? Simpler times. Then Pope Francis came along and muddied things. He talks about climate change, castigates capitalism and plays verbal footsie with lefty Catholic hobby-horse issues like divorce and gay acceptance. This Francis guy, they think, might be one of us.



According to many in the media, Kavanaugh typed in a 15-year-old e-mail that American abortion law wasn’t “settled law.” They’re wrong. On Sept. 6, The New York Times published a 2003 e-mail that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sent during his time at the George W. Bush White House. Kavanaugh wrote he wasn’t certain “all legal scholars refer to Roe as the settled law of the land.” But many media headlines translated that to mean Kavanaugh himself wasn’t certain Roe was the settled law of the land.



The Associated Press and the New York Times both tried to spin a Catholic archbishop's recent exposé about the Church's sex abuse scandal as an ideological attack on Pope Francis from the right. AP's Nicole Winfield touted how Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano turned to "ultra-conservative media that have been highly critical of Francis' mercy-over-morals papacy." The Times write-up highlighted how "some conservative American bishops swiftly came to Archbishop Viganò’s defense."



As part of the liberal media’s obsession with Omarosa’s salacious allegations against the President from her book tour, Tuesday’s White House Press Briefing featured nearly four times as many questions about Omarosa-related topics as all other matters. Specifically, the breakdown was 39 Omarosa questions by 11 reporters to 10 questions for everything else from seven journalists (Afghanistan, Chinese influence in South America, ISIS, the Mueller probe, and Turkey).