Looking at the grief Starbucks has received for problems with two patrons at a Philadelphia store, one might ask why current Executive Chairman and former CEO Howard Schultz didn't buy some media protection by purchasing a major newspaper. Fellow Seattle-area resident and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos did that with the Washington Post in 2013. Amazon's alleged engagement in 21st-century sweatshop practices and union-busting has gone virtually unnoticed in the establishment press since Bezos bought the Post.



Friday, the Associated Press reported that in early 2017, President Donald Trump and then-FBI Director James Comey agreed there should be a crackdown on leaks from within the administration. But the AP reporters refused to apply any form of the word "leak" to Comey's release of a memo through an intermediary to the New York Times in May 2017 — even though it did when the leak originally occurred.



The Associated Press and many of the AP's colleagues in the establishment press have had a nearly 60-year romance with Cuba's brutal communist regime. They have frequently regaled readers with the island nation's "free healthcare" and "free education," as if that makes up for the fact that the typical Cuban subsists on far less than the $2 a day the international community considers extreme poverty. Today, the AP, in a tweet and at least two headlines, pretended that it was a free election that elevated Miguel Diaz-Canel to Cuba's presidency.



The press has clearly chosen to downplay the Inspector General's damning Friday report on the conduct leading to former Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe's dismissal. The worst such example was a grudging Saturday item at the Associated Press.



Most of the establishment press's coverage of President Donald Trump's pardon of Scooter Libby has not mentioned Richard Armitage, the person who admitted that he first leaked allegedly covert CIA agent Valerie Plame's name to journalist Robert Novak in 2003. This pervasive failure includes items at the Associated Press, New York Times, the Washington Post, and over 80 percent of Google News stories about Libby.



The Arizona Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that illegal immigrants protected from deportation under former President Barack Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program are not eligible for in-state tuition rates at state universities and community colleges. Press coverage is glossing over the fact that the state's educational establishment unilaterally took obviously illegal actions to institute this practice, directly defying a 2006 measure approved by 71 percent of the state's voters.



In the aftermath of House Speaker Paul Ryan's announcement that he will retire from Congress, amid the speculation about who might replace him as top Republican in the House, the Washington Post ran an AP story by Alan Fram which repeats the debunked claims that House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was a speaker for a David Duke-founded white supremacist group without even acknowledging any of the evidence that he was not. In fact, at this point, in spite of media silence, there's more evidence that prominent Democrats have directly associated with Louis Farrakhan than there is that Scalise was ever connected to Duke.



Saturday was, as Katie Yoder at NewsBusters noted Tuesday afternoon, a "sad day." That's when the Women's March sprang to the defense of Backpage.com, tweeting that its Friday seizure by the Justice Department "is an absolute crisis for sex workers." In that same tweet, the group declared that "Sex workers rights are women’s rights." Backpage and seven associated individuals were indicted Monday on charges relating to facilitating prostitution — including child prostitution conducted by human sex traffickers. Thus far, the establishment press has been almost unanimously running cover for the Women's March by ignoring its disgraceful position.



A Democratic House member has, by her own admission, failed to protect female staff members who said they were harassed and treated violently by her former chief of staff. Rep. Elizabeth Esty has also admitted that she gave the chief of staff a $5,000 payoff when he left, along with a favorable job recommendation. In her Friday evening report on the situation, the Associated Press's Susan Haigh played defense — for Esty, describing her as "an outspoken advocate for the #MeToo movement" who is now in an "awkward position." Haigh also tried to help her salvage her political career by describing her outreach to groups involved with "issues affecting women" when she knew the news was about to go public.



On March 21, The National Sheriffs Association released a letter signed by 380 of its members demanding that Congress pass legislation "tightening border security" and "support(ing) the replacement and upgrades to current barriers and fencing and construction of barriers along the U.S. and Mexico international boundary." The press has virtually ignored this effort.



The Boston Globe has published at least three reports about Bryon Hefner, the husband of now-former Massachusetts State Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, culminating today in coverage of Hefner's indictment on "multiple charges of sexual assault, criminal lewdness, and distributing nude photographs without consent." None of the stories reviewed directly tagged Rosenberg as a Democrat.



The first questionable habit of the liberal Fact Checkers is to nitpick tweets, especially Trump tweets. There can be outrageous and blatantly false statements in a tweet, but often tweets use a political shorthand. The headline was "AP FACT CHECK: Trump wrongly claims GOP can hold top court". Trump tweeted that "we need more Republicans in 20189 and must ALWAYS hold the Supreme Court" to prevent a repeal of the Second Amendment.