Amazon’s influence might bring another Democratic presidential candidate to the stage. Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg recently filed to be on the Alabama ballot in the 2020 primary.



Even though Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) wants to break up Big Tech and regulate it, those who profit from the tech industry support her anyway. Warren had her most successful fundraising quarter yet, raising $125,305 from employees at Facebook, Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, and their subsidiaries.

 



Americans seem to love Big Tech’s latest smart devices for their conveniences, but are Amazon- and Google-approved apps being used to eavesdrop and phish for your passwords?



With experts warning about hackers and insider sabotage as Amazon expands into the business of elections, should American voters worry about officials putting all their eggs in one basket? Amazon Web Services (AWS) has increasingly become involved with both “state and local elections,” noted Reuters inn an article titled “How Amazon.com moved into the business of U.S. elections.”  “More than 40 states now use one or more of Amazon’s election offerings,according to a presentation given by an Amazon executive this year.” But security experts are concerned about how risky AWS’s decentralization of election data will be. 



If you’re not preparing now to serve our future robot overlords, then you’d better start. Amazon, since at least Jan. 2019, has been hard at work developing what it calls a “fully-electric delivery system – Amazon Scout – designed to safely get packages to customers using autonomous delivery devices.” Amazon has already developed Amazon AI. You know her as Alexa, and her counterpart is the Echo. Alexa, Amazon notes, is “Amazon’s cloud-based voice service,” and it is available “on more than 100 million devices from Amazon and third-party device manufacturers.” From playing music to making phone calls to family members, and from setting timers to sharing the weather forecast – even learning French – Amazon Alexa could be in the infancy stages of what could otherwise be considered the core of Skynet.



In a recent piece on Amazon’s “Day One” blog, Amazon detailed some of the “[n]ew ways Alexa makes life simpler and more convenient” and “your home smarter and safer” all the while keeping your “family and friends connected, and bring[ing] your favorite entertainment to  you, wherever  you are.”



The general consensus among Americans is that Big Tech companies should be broken up for violating antitrust behavior. In a poll from YouGov and the thinktank Data for Progress, 60 percent of Republicans agreed that tech companies should be broken up and regulated. The poll, which was first reported by Vox, asked the opinions of 1,280 potential voters. Overall, YouGov found that seven out of ten people were in favor of breaking up Big Tech companies.



Note to lefty special interests: Pick on the Big Tech companies. They’re pushovers.  Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced at the National Press Club on September 19 that he was making massive changes to Amazon in order to fight climate change. More than 1,500 Amazon employees pledged to walk out on strike on September 20 as part of the Global Climate Strike along with other tech employees from Google and Microsoft.



Amazon, whose labor practices have been criticized from the left and right, is now facing a strike, over climate change activism. Amazon will face its first worker’s strike in its meteoric 25-year history. Many other Big tech giants from Google to Riot Games and Wayfair. Now the bell of worker’s activism tolls for Amazon.



No, no, no. Hell, no! That's my response to the latest trial balloon floated by the White House to join with Silicon Valley on a creepy program monitoring Americans’ “neurobehavioral signs” to (purportedly) prevent gun violence. President Donald Trump's old friend, former NBC head Bob Wright, has been pushing an Orwellian surveillance scheme called “Safe Home” — “Stopping Aberrant Fatal Events by Helping Overcome Mental Extremes” — that would cost taxpayers between $40 million and $60 million. 



Carnival Row, a new series on Amazon Prime, could have been an entertaining murder mystery featuring star-crossed lovers but was, instead, a heavy-handed immigration allegory in which anyone who advocates for laws to be enforced is just a racist. Rycroft "Philo" Philostrate (Orlando Bloom), a human man, and Vignette Stonemoss (Cara Delvigne), a fairy woman, met and fell in love when he was a soldier occupying her land, Tirnanoc.



Facebook is allegedly trying to monitor its workers’ psychiatric trauma sessions. According to a letter written by whistleblowers within Accenture, a Facebook contractor, “This pressuring of a licensed counselor to divulge confidential information is at best a careless breach of trust into the Wellness program and, at worst, an ethics and possible legal violation.”