Note to lefty special interests: Pick on the Big Tech companies. They’re pushovers.  Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced at the National Press Club on September 19 that he was making massive changes to Amazon in order to fight climate change. More than 1,500 Amazon employees pledged to walk out on strike on September 20 as part of the Global Climate Strike along with other tech employees from Google and Microsoft.



Amazon, whose labor practices have been criticized from the left and right, is now facing a strike, over climate change activism. Amazon will face its first worker’s strike in its meteoric 25-year history. Many other Big tech giants from Google to Riot Games and Wayfair. Now the bell of worker’s activism tolls for Amazon.



No, no, no. Hell, no! That's my response to the latest trial balloon floated by the White House to join with Silicon Valley on a creepy program monitoring Americans’ “neurobehavioral signs” to (purportedly) prevent gun violence. President Donald Trump's old friend, former NBC head Bob Wright, has been pushing an Orwellian surveillance scheme called “Safe Home” — “Stopping Aberrant Fatal Events by Helping Overcome Mental Extremes” — that would cost taxpayers between $40 million and $60 million. 



Carnival Row, a new series on Amazon Prime, could have been an entertaining murder mystery featuring star-crossed lovers but was, instead, a heavy-handed immigration allegory in which anyone who advocates for laws to be enforced is just a racist. Rycroft "Philo" Philostrate (Orlando Bloom), a human man, and Vignette Stonemoss (Cara Delvigne), a fairy woman, met and fell in love when he was a soldier occupying her land, Tirnanoc.



Facebook is allegedly trying to monitor its workers’ psychiatric trauma sessions. According to a letter written by whistleblowers within Accenture, a Facebook contractor, “This pressuring of a licensed counselor to divulge confidential information is at best a careless breach of trust into the Wellness program and, at worst, an ethics and possible legal violation.”



Amazon Prime’s latest series The Boys is based on the graphic novel of the same name by Garth Ennis, the same writer behind Preacher. The show is also produced by Evan Goldberg and Seth Rogan, who helped to develop the Preacher television series. So is it safe to say that The Boys is just as raunchy, gory, and sacrilegiously irreverent as Preacher? Sadly, it may be much worse.



Just as online retailer Amazon hoped to entice millions of its Prime members to spend on Prime Day, CNN launched an attack on “fast, free shipping” for not being environmentally friendly. Senior economics writer Lydia DePillis complained on July 15, that fast shipping, like Amazon’s new Prime Free One-Day option, has a “hidden cost” to the environment. She criticized “America’s addiction to absurdly fast shipping” for pushing retailers to do a “careful dance” to minimize environmental impact without turning off potential buyers.



As of July 15, Facebook will likely be facing a 5 billion dollar fine from the Department of Justice (DOJ) for privacy issues caused by the scandal. USA Today says “the company had violated a consent agreement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) that entered into in 2011.” The fine is being sent to the DOJ for final approval today.



Have you heard about Amazon’s Alexa? She may have heard you. Reports came out in April that full time contract workers for Amazon in the U.S., Costa Rica, and Romania have been listening up to 1,000 audio clips, some of them lasting up to nine hours.



The Thursday Social Media Summit at the White House will rally supporters of free speech. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.), who plans to attend the summit, has commented that he is “concerned there are people who work at the major technology platforms who want to put their thumb on the scale.” “All we want is a fair fight,” said Gaetz. “I guess in a sense if highlighting experiences and instances of bias will result in fewer moderations that present as bias, all the better.”



Retail companies feel threatened by the rise of tech monopolies. Walmart, Target, Best Buy and others wrote a 10 page letter to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) on June 30. The letter begged the FTC to investigate Amazon and Google for antitrust violations.  Business Insider says Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) was attempting to “capitalize on the growing hostility towards big tech in Washington D.C.”
 



Ever wonder what tech giants do to keep their proprietary information in house and away from other tech companies just as savvy as they are? Microsoft is one company that has kept an eye out for this. “Microsoft has a list of online services that it forbids its workforce to use,” according to Mashable, reporting on a story originally from GeekWire. This list includes programs such as slack, Google Docs, Amazon Web Services, and any other outside web sources.