Every day that goes by continues to generate more controversy for Ralph Northam, the Democratic candidate for governor of Virginia, regarding a minute-long commercial that attempts to portray Republicans in the Old Dominion as race-baiting, Confederate flag-waving villains.



Even though few political campaigns are underway this year, the gubernatorial contests in New Jersey and Virginia have drawn the attention of the All Things Considered weekday program on the liberal, taxpayer-funded National Public Radio network. Host Ari Shapiro began a segment on Tuesday, October 31, by stating: “The Republican candidates in both of these states have released attack ads claiming the Democratic opponents would not enforce immigration laws and would endanger people living in those states.”



NPR's Eric Deggans fawned over the "triumph" of the new TV series, Star Trek: Discovery, on Monday's All Things Considered. Despite his praise for the "diversity" in this latest installment in the sci-fi franchise, Deggans still managed to jab at it from the left by noting that "it was odd as a black man to see the bad guy T'Kuvma and many of his followers were the darkest-colored Klingons we've seen yet, as if darkening their complexion makes them more menacing." The TV critic also boosted a media talking point that connects Discovery's villain to President Donald Trump.



Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR aired two segments that took shots at President Donald Trump and Senator Ted Cruz's handling of the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Both reports featured talking heads from liberal organizations, but didn't explicitly mention their ideological stance. By contast, the segments clearly identified specific individual and groups as "conservative." 



Taxpayer-funded PBS and NPR are now in the polling business with Marist College, and like the other networks, their polls are often used to support putting heat on Republicans. On Wednesday, they announced they had found a majority of Americans were disappointed with the president’s responsive to the violence in Charlottesville. PBS then ignored their own finding that 62 percent favored leaving Confederate statues in place, while only 27 percent want them removed. NPR reported it once, and then insisted that had nothing to do with Charlottesville.

Buried in the weeds: They also asked if Americans approve or disapprove of Black Lives Matter: 50 percent disapproved, and only 33 percent approved. They even asked about approval of Antifa, but few had heard of them yet: Five percent approved, 24 percent disapproved.



As expected, on Friday night the PBS NewsHour greeted the failure to repeal Obamacare as a happy "flame-out" by the Republican Party, and pseudo-conservative PBS pundit David Brooks insisted it's time for Republicans to "wrap their minds around the fact" that Americans want to preserve health care as a "right." 



On Wednesday, NPR's All Things Considered sided with opponents of President Donald Trump's proposal to bar transgender people from serving in the military. Host Kelly McEvers interviewed veteran Jordan Blisk, who served in the Air Force Reserve before then-President Barack Obama's administration lifted the previous ban in June 2016, and came out as transgender after leaving the military. However, McEvers failed to mention that Blisk is now a LGBT activist in Colorado. The public radio program also didn't bring on any supporters of the new policy.



The Wednesday edition of NPR's All Things Considered spotlighted 15 teenaged Latina activists who protested a new law in Texas that allows law enforcement in the state to investigate the immigration status of individuals in police custody. The young women dressed in formal dresses during their demonstration outside the state capitol in Austin, and performed a choreographed dance. Correspondent Vanessa Romo identified the group that organized the protest, but failed to mention their liberal ideology.



On Tuesday, NPR's All Things Considered channeled its inner millenial by airing a full segment on smartphone apps for singles in the U.K. who are opposed to Brexit. Lauren Frayer played up how "many British singles...have started posting how they voted — 'leave' or 'remain' — on their dating profiles." She also spotlighted the "Better Together Dating" app, which apparently "bills itself as Tinder for the 48 percent. That's the proportion of British voters who chose 'remain' in last year's EU referendum."



Wednesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted how a conservative portion of California supposedly needs ObamaCare to stay, despite the personal opposition of the people there. Robert Siegel played up that "a lot of people there have benefited from a law Republicans are trying to roll back — the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare." April Dembosky of local affiliate KQED spotlighted how "clinics in the northeast corner of the state are lobbying local officials to take an unpopular position in this conservative land: defend ObamaCare."



On Monday, NPR promoted a demonstration of 200 ObamaCare supporters, who gathered in a county in Texas where President Donald Trump almost got 80 percent of the popular vote. Despite this statistic, the public radio outlet couldn't find any conservatives for their report on All Things Considered. All but one of the sound bites during the segment came from ObamaCare backers. The remaing clip came from a libertarian, who watched the demonstration from his workplace.



Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted how many Muslims in the United Kingdom are blaming British media outlets for the Monday incident where a Welsh man drove his van into a crowd outside a mosque in London. In their view, "the way the media covers Muslims has fueled hatred of their community," as host Kelly McEvers put it.