While the Super Bowl had no hint of a national-anthem protest, liberals still found something to be angry about – “cultural appropriation” of two famous black men. Washington Post reporting intern Sonia Rao began: “In 2018, we heard Martin Luther King Jr speak and saw Prince perform during the Supreme Bowl....Both instances sparked immediate backlash online.” NPR implied that somehow you can't find Martin Luther King speeches except in Dodge commercials.


On Sunday, NPR host Michel Martin interviewed Maroon 5 keyboardist P.J. Morton on his solo record and a song that “caught my ear” called “Religion.” The lyrics included: “I don't think I like your religion. Don't always make the best decisions. Not saying you don't have good intentions. I know that you are only human.” Of course, this song was about evangelicals and Donald Trump, and somehow, Trump and his fans were comparable to religious backers of slavery.


In the midst of reports of the president’s unfortunate reference to immigration from “s---hole” countries, the PBS NewsHour analysts were agreeing with each other on everything on Friday, but NPR’s Week in Review segment brought listeners an actual debate. Conservative Orange County Register columnist John Phillips was back to shock NPR snobs with a pro-Trump set of arguments. 


NPR's All Things Considered on Thursday zeroed in on a pro-life organization that tries to get the employees of abortion facilities to end their participation in the killing of unborn babies. Despite the surprising attention on former Planned Parenthood manager Abby Johnson and her group, And Then There Were None, the public radio program still inserted slanted language into their report. Sarah McCammon labeled the organization an "anti-abortion group." McCammon later noted that Johnson has "gradually been embraced by the anti-abortion rights movement."


NPR's Friday night broadcast of All Things Considered offered two younger pundits in their Week in Review segment -- on the left, Vox editor and co-founder Matthew Yglesias and on the right, Rachael Larimore of The Weekly Standard. Both were critical of Trump and professed some shock and fatigue at how Trump dominates the news. But when anchor Ari Shapiro asked about overlooked stories of 2017, even the lefty admitted that the media probably under-emphasized the crushing of ISIS in Trump's first year: 


National Public Radio attacked conservatism again on Sunday night’s All Things Considered by promoting leftist author Elaine Tyler May and her new book Fortress America: How We Embraced Fear and Abandoned Democracy. May contends that conservatives have promoted un-factual fears like the communist threat and violent crime to gain power. At interview’s end, they disclosed that May’s son Michael is on staff at NPR….but claimed the producer who booked her apparently wasn’t aware of that fact.


Even when conservatives express their view that any adult male who seeks out underage girls is a "pervert," they will still be questioned for suggesting the liberal media has a partisan tilt. National Public Radio has been rotating some fresh conservative pundits on their Week in Review segments on Friday nights, and Orange County Register columnist John Phillips said things that David Brooks never says -- that the media aren't trusted because they advocate for the liberal side. That drew a laughable reply from NPR anchor Kelly McEvers. She denied they had an openly anti-Trump, anti-Republican bias. 


When liberal journalists lecture us about how much more they revere quality reporting than we do,  just observe how they treat disgraced Dan Rather. On Friday night's All Things Considered, NPR anchor Ari Shapiro treated Rather as the closest thing we have to the Cronkite Myth, the national anchor of our patriotism. 


Every day that goes by continues to generate more controversy for Ralph Northam, the Democratic candidate for governor of Virginia, regarding a minute-long commercial that attempts to portray Republicans in the Old Dominion as race-baiting, Confederate flag-waving villains.


Even though few political campaigns are underway this year, the gubernatorial contests in New Jersey and Virginia have drawn the attention of the All Things Considered weekday program on the liberal, taxpayer-funded National Public Radio network. Host Ari Shapiro began a segment on Tuesday, October 31, by stating: “The Republican candidates in both of these states have released attack ads claiming the Democratic opponents would not enforce immigration laws and would endanger people living in those states.”


NPR's Eric Deggans fawned over the "triumph" of the new TV series, Star Trek: Discovery, on Monday's All Things Considered. Despite his praise for the "diversity" in this latest installment in the sci-fi franchise, Deggans still managed to jab at it from the left by noting that "it was odd as a black man to see the bad guy T'Kuvma and many of his followers were the darkest-colored Klingons we've seen yet, as if darkening their complexion makes them more menacing." The TV critic also boosted a media talking point that connects Discovery's villain to President Donald Trump.


Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR aired two segments that took shots at President Donald Trump and Senator Ted Cruz's handling of the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Both reports featured talking heads from liberal organizations, but didn't explicitly mention their ideological stance. By contast, the segments clearly identified specific individual and groups as "conservative."