NPR media reporter David Folkenflik shoveled his network's usual loads of disgust for Fox News in his coverage of Megyn Kelly's show getting canceled, allegedly over a discussion of racially insensitive Halloween costumes. "She really took on a lot of fire as a figure who brought on ideological baggage, who brought Fox News baggage." But Folkenflik didn't take this approach to MSNBC host Al Sharpton. 



On Friday's night's All Things Considered, the Week in Politics segment began by pushing the theme that the Republican rhetoric about "mobs" is all wrong, and will harm them in the midterms. NPR anchor Ailsa Chang brought no context about protesters mobbing the front door of the Supreme Court, or screaming Sen. Ted Cruz and his wife out of a restaurant. She said the "mob" has a lot of women in it, so the M-word is damaging. At least David Brooks said "I don't think so."



Here's a Saturday "parlor game" for political junkies. Guess which statement on NPR's "Week in Politics" segment on Friday night's so-called All Things Considered comes from the supposed liberal/Democrat pundit, and which comes from the supposed conservative/Republican pundit. This can be pretty tricky, since they sound very, very similar.



New York Times columnist David Brooks expressed public disagreement with his editorial-page bosses on Friday night's All Things Considered on NPR. He didn't directly mock their choice to publish an anonymous "senior administration official" bragging about how they keep President Trump in check from his worst impulses. He just mocked the official: "It was a stupid act. You know, if you're going to be protecting the president from himself, don't tell him. And so, you know, it's going to make him be much more erratic and much more willful in the face of White House aides."

 



National Public Radio squeaks its liberalism in almost every sentence. Take a Tuesday night report on Obama's "Clean Power Plan." Chang only interviewed the Obama-loving director of the World Resources Institute and went right to the Left's usual talking point: conservatives will kill people with their failure to be eco-socialists.



NPR and other liberal networks fail to acknowledge how their "robust critical discourse" about Trump wasn't there when Obama was president. On Saturday night's All Things Considered, the taxpayer-funded network promoted a murder mystery starring the heroes....Barack Obama and Joe Biden. They acted like everyone would love this "fun newbook." The cheerful, overly familiar online headline was "Barack and Joe Solve a Murder Mystery."



NPR has invited on a rotating group of liberal and conservative panelists in recent months for their Week In Review panel on All Things Considered. On Friday night, they rigged that system by matching a topic with a "conservative." The topic was whether Sarah Huckabee Sanders was right to complain that the media "attacked me personally." The "conservative was Jennifer Rubin -- described by NPR host Ailsa Chang as the "Right Turn" columnist for The Washington Post -- who is precisely one of those who have attacked Sanders, harshly and personally.  



NPR has a habit -- call it "counterintuitive" -- of trashing popular beliefs on major holidays (or holy days). On Good Friday in 2008, for example, NPR's Fresh Air rebroadcast a guest who trashed Christianity. On July 4, 2018, All Things Considered replayed a five-year-old interview suggesting the beloved patriotic song "God Bless America" annoys "many" with its "syrupy nationalism and trivialized faith," and Woody Guthrie suggested it was a "whitewash of everything that was wrong with America."



Conservative attorney Gayle Trotter was invited to sit in the "conservative" analyst seat in NPR's Week in Politics segment on Friday's All Things Considered, and shocked anchor Audie Cornish by identifying socialist Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as part of the "Venezuelan wing of the Democratic Party." Cornish said she had to "pause for that," and then laughed at her. It wasn't an "objective" laugh. 



Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR targeted the Supreme Court's decision that upheld President Donald Trump's travel ban. Host Mary Louise Kelly touted that "the Court's conservatives plac[ed] few limits on presidential power" on the issue. Nina Totenburg lined up three legal experts who all expressed "distinct disappointment" in the high court's ruling. Totenburg also spotlighted that the first version of the ban caused "chaotic scenes in airports across the globe."



On Thursday's All Things Considered, NPR predictably hyped the impact of scandals involving the Catholic Church during their coverage of Ireland's abortion vote. Correspondent Alice Fordham noted that "during this ferociously noisy national debate [over abortion], the Church's role has seemed muted." She emphasized that "the Church's credibility in Ireland has suffered, after investigations uncovered child abuse and institutional abuse of unmarried mothers." Fordham later underlined that "many of those affected by the...abuses hope this referendum will mark a decisive defeat" for the Church.



NPR's All Things Considered on Thursday promoted an activist's own spin about her abortion campaign in Ireland, which likened the cause to the 19th-century effort that helped slaves escape bondage in the Southern United States. Lauren Frayer spotlighted how "there's a sort of modern-day underground railroad discreetly shuttling thousands of Irish women to abortion clinics" outside of the Emerald Isle. This is the same phrase that Mara Clarke of the Abortion Support Network used during a soundbite later in Frayer's report: "You could call it an underground railroad. I prefer to think of it as sisters doing it for themselves."