Top Obama aide Valerie Jarrett is plugging a new memoir, and in 12 minutes and two interview segments on All Things Considered, NPR had just one challenging question for her: what about this touchy-Biden issue? When they turned to the wider stage of Campaign 2020, it sounded like a Democrat precinct chat, and NPR anchor Audie Cornish seemed to worry that none of the contenders would match the wondrous appeal of Obama, who was... "an idea," not just a person:



On Saturday's All Things Considered, NPR host Michel Martin dragged President Trump into a discussion of the dreadful New Zealand mosque murders -- not just Trump, but anyone who likes rhetoric like "build a wall." Her guest was Christian Picciolini, a former white supremacist. NPR and other liberal media have embraced the line that white racist terrorism is a larger global threat than Islamic jihadism. 



There are times that women complain about sexism in politics where they just sound ridiculous. Take the Friday night "Week in Politics" roundup on National Public Radio. Host Mary Louise Kelly was outraged by a Huffington Post story on Sen. Amy Klobuchar, expected to announce a presidential run. See if you can believe this complaint. Kelly claimed "I don't remember a lot of Are Men Nice Enough stories" in the 2016 campaign! 



National Public Radio hailed science-fiction author N.K. Jemisin, who has now won the Hugo Award for three straight years from the World Science Fiction Convention. NPR anchor Ari Shapiro explained her "Broken Earth" books "take place in a world where natural disasters are more common and more destructive. And the people with powers to mitigate those disasters are feared and oppressed."

But it turns out this is science fiction "ripped from the headlines" -- and somehow, in Jemisin's mind, the Ferguson riots of 2014 were an "unarmed, peaceful protest."



NPR media reporter David Folkenflik shoveled his network's usual loads of disgust for Fox News in his coverage of Megyn Kelly's show getting canceled, allegedly over a discussion of racially insensitive Halloween costumes. "She really took on a lot of fire as a figure who brought on ideological baggage, who brought Fox News baggage." But Folkenflik didn't take this approach to MSNBC host Al Sharpton. 



On Friday's night's All Things Considered, the Week in Politics segment began by pushing the theme that the Republican rhetoric about "mobs" is all wrong, and will harm them in the midterms. NPR anchor Ailsa Chang brought no context about protesters mobbing the front door of the Supreme Court, or screaming Sen. Ted Cruz and his wife out of a restaurant. She said the "mob" has a lot of women in it, so the M-word is damaging. At least David Brooks said "I don't think so."



Here's a Saturday "parlor game" for political junkies. Guess which statement on NPR's "Week in Politics" segment on Friday night's so-called All Things Considered comes from the supposed liberal/Democrat pundit, and which comes from the supposed conservative/Republican pundit. This can be pretty tricky, since they sound very, very similar.



New York Times columnist David Brooks expressed public disagreement with his editorial-page bosses on Friday night's All Things Considered on NPR. He didn't directly mock their choice to publish an anonymous "senior administration official" bragging about how they keep President Trump in check from his worst impulses. He just mocked the official: "It was a stupid act. You know, if you're going to be protecting the president from himself, don't tell him. And so, you know, it's going to make him be much more erratic and much more willful in the face of White House aides."

 



National Public Radio squeaks its liberalism in almost every sentence. Take a Tuesday night report on Obama's "Clean Power Plan." Chang only interviewed the Obama-loving director of the World Resources Institute and went right to the Left's usual talking point: conservatives will kill people with their failure to be eco-socialists.



NPR and other liberal networks fail to acknowledge how their "robust critical discourse" about Trump wasn't there when Obama was president. On Saturday night's All Things Considered, the taxpayer-funded network promoted a murder mystery starring the heroes....Barack Obama and Joe Biden. They acted like everyone would love this "fun newbook." The cheerful, overly familiar online headline was "Barack and Joe Solve a Murder Mystery."



NPR has invited on a rotating group of liberal and conservative panelists in recent months for their Week In Review panel on All Things Considered. On Friday night, they rigged that system by matching a topic with a "conservative." The topic was whether Sarah Huckabee Sanders was right to complain that the media "attacked me personally." The "conservative was Jennifer Rubin -- described by NPR host Ailsa Chang as the "Right Turn" columnist for The Washington Post -- who is precisely one of those who have attacked Sanders, harshly and personally.  



NPR has a habit -- call it "counterintuitive" -- of trashing popular beliefs on major holidays (or holy days). On Good Friday in 2008, for example, NPR's Fresh Air rebroadcast a guest who trashed Christianity. On July 4, 2018, All Things Considered replayed a five-year-old interview suggesting the beloved patriotic song "God Bless America" annoys "many" with its "syrupy nationalism and trivialized faith," and Woody Guthrie suggested it was a "whitewash of everything that was wrong with America."