From Tuesday’s With All Due Respect on Bloomberg TV and MSNBC, “Trump’s Hand Gestures,” a collection of Donald Trump’s animated hand movements. Co-host Mark Halperin explained Bloomberg’s producers identified “73 distinct motions” in a Trump speech in Buffalo the day before and, for this video compilation, they showed and named a bunch of them – including “The Bunny,” “The Claw,” The Forehead Tattoo” and “Pocket Rockets.”



Will this stem the MSM's flood of deserved praise for Prince? It turns out that Touré--better known in these parts as a former spoke in MSNBC's since-cancelled Cycle--is also a Prince biographer, his book  published in 2013.

Appearing on With All Due Respect today, Touré cited two sources: Prince's former sound engineer, and a member of his band, for the proposition that Prince was a "conservative" and a "Republican." Touré embraced the notion himself, but, being a liberal, described what it means to be a conservative in pejorative terms: "I am making money, I'm successful, I want this money and this success protected .  . . When you are rich, you want status quo." 



From bathrooms to abortions, Bloomberg's John Heilemann believes that in his heart, Donald Trump is a social liberal. Heilemann made his assertion on today's With All Due Respect in the context of discussing Trump's comments on a Today town hall this morning in which he was critical of the North Carolina transgender bathroom law, and said he'd have no problem letting Caitlyn Jenner choose any bathroom.

Heilemann: "Trump is probably, I think in his gut, a social liberal. I think his position on abortion, for instance, the ["very pro-choice"] position he held for most of his life, is the real position . . . I think on this issue he's like most Manhattanites or most New Yorkers: he's basically a social liberal."



Oops!

It was quite an amusing moment yesterday on Bloomberg's With All Due Respect when Mark Halperin corrected his co-host, John Heilemann, on delegate math history. As you can see in the video below, Heilemann asserted that Donald Trump was not doing as well as he should be because at this point in the 2012 Republican primary, Mitt Romney already had enough delegates to lock up the nomination. Halperin then interjected to point out that Romney did not have the nomination locked up until much later than now. The funniest thing about this exchange was the sheepish reaction from Heilemann.



Question to John Heilemann: what's your proof? On his With All Due Respect show this evening, interviewing Ice Cube of NWA, Heilemann flatly stated that the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Freddie Gray in Baltimore were instances of "police brutality." In the Brown case, the grand jury, which included three African-Americans, declined to bring an indictment against Darren Wilson, the Ferguson police officer who shot Brown. And President Obama's Justice Department under then AG Eric Holder cleared Wilson of civil rights violations in the shooting. 

In Baltimore, the the only result to date has been a mistrial. So what does Heilemann know that the judicial system doesn't about "police brutality" in those cases? Or was this just a case of Heilemann trying to prove to Ice Cube--who by the way displayed more equanimity than Heileman in his comments on this and other issues--that he was down with the struggle? 



"At the end of the day" has been voted the most irritating, hackneyed expression in the English language. If once in a while it slips into our speech, no big whoop. But in her interview on With All Due Respect today, when Hillary's political director, Amanda Renteria, used the expression twice in her very first answer, it caught this NewsBuster's attention.

And so I found myself counting. Three, four--could this really go on?  Yes! Five, and . . . a final sixth time before the interview finally ground to an end! Not to be too apocalyptic, but it has been said that losing the New York primary could be cataclysmic for Hillary. Is the end of days on the mind of the Clinton campaign?



Was it good-natured ribbing by John Heilemann, or unvarnished venom? On today's With All Due Respect, Republican Dan Senor made the case--at length--as to why Paul Ryan would make a great candidate to oppose Hillary Clinton. But Senor then proceeded to claim that Ryan would not seek the nomination because the Speaker doesn't think it's "appropriate."

Heilemann responded with a flurry of "lying" accusations: "stop telling your lies on television . . . stop with the lying . . . lyin' Dan Senor." 



Imagine that a senior Hillary aide--not to mention Hillary herself--were indicted over the email scandal. In a million years, could you imagine John Heilemann asking what such person would have to do to prove his or her innocence? Neither could I. But on today's With All Due RespectHeilemann asked a Florida criminal defense attorney [not Lewandowski's lawyer]: "What is the legal standard? What does Corey Lewandowski have to prove, to prove his innocence?" 

Attorney Whitney Boan politely pointed out that under the Constitution, Lewandowski doesn't have to prove or disprove anything, and that to the contrary the burden is on the State of Florida to prove the charge "beyond a reasonable doubt." Heilemann was appropriately contrite, saying "you're right to call me on having gotten that thing backwards, and thank you for doing that." But the presumption of innocence is ninth-grade civics stuff. That Heilemann would have ever asked such a question in the first place suggests some serious bias. 



"Democrats often have the media on their side because of liberal bias."

That sounds like a very common complaint among conservatives. However, that is exactly what liberal Mark Halperin stated yesterday on Bloomberg's With All Due Respect when he admitted the very obvious. This admission came during a discussion about how the Senate refusing to hold hearings on President Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court will supposedly help Democrats. In fact Halperin and co-host John Heileman were practically leaping for joy in their belief in how this issue will damage Republicans in the upcoming Senate elections. Perhaps it was this anticipatory glee that caused Halperin to let down his guard and make his surprising admission about liberal media bias.



On today's With All Due Respect, NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg broke some news, saying she thought President Obama "got a message from Republicans via backchannels that they would probably move this [Supreme Court] nomination after the presidential election."

Let's game-plan this out. If it means that Senate Republicans would move to confirm President Obama's pick of Merrick Garland even if a Republican were elected president, it would be a huge backstab of the Republican base. But if Republicans would only move Garland if a Dem wins, thus depriving Hillary or whomever of the chance to nominate an unreconstruced radical, then it could be a crafty maneuver. Totenberg added that once Obama got such a concession, Dems would "work very hard" to get other concessions, forcing a hearing and a vote.



Has Al Hunt ever heard of de mortuis nil nisi bonum? Apparently not. On the day she was laid to rest, Hunt found it necessary to repeatedly assert that Nancy Reagan "was not a good mother."

Interviewed by John Heilemann on today's With All Due Respect, here was Hunt: "she was a formidable person. Sometimes unpleasant, not a great mother, but she loved her Ronnie and had great political instincts . . . She was not a good mother. I think actually Patti Davis, as moving as she was today, if you really listened to it, all was clear: she was not a good mother. She was devoted to Ronald Reagan, and anything that got in the way was a distraction."



Mark Halperin has ripped the MSM for its "outrageous" treatment of Bernie Sanders. Calling the media "lemmings," Halperin, seconded by John Heilemann, said on today's With All Due Respect, that the Hillary campaign has ginned up "faux outrage" over a number of Sanders' statements, and that the media has been "following it around," treating minor matters like "major contretemps."

Halperin also had a warning for Republicans: 'just wait until a general election if Hillary Clinton is the nominee at how much faux outrage her campaign shows over whoever the Republicans nominate." That comes as no surprise, but still refreshing to hear Halperin say it.