On Wednesday's Good Morning America, ABC correspondent Linsey Davis tried to link President Donald Trump to a controversial religious figure in a way that it is unlikely that the news show would do if it involved a Democratic President instead. Near the end of a report updating viewers on the unusually bad flu season, Davis showed video of evangelist Gloria Copeland suggesting that it was not necessary to get a flu shot, alleging that prayer could prevent the flu, before the ABC reporter identified her as "an advisor on the President's evangelical board."

 


Two nights before the Philadelphia Eagles took home its first Super Bowl trophy, the networks were far more focused on stories related to the big game than to one measure of the U.S. economy. So pre-game stories still outranked the strong jobs report nearly 5-to-1.


After Chief of Staff General John Kelly told reporters Tuesday that the discrepancy between the number of registered DACA recipients and those eligible for the program was probably due to people being too lazy or too fearful to apply for the program, the media went into a tailspin of fury over the adviser’s blunt comments.


On Wednesday morning, NBC’s Today show and ABC’s Good Morning America recited identical liberal talking points as both broadcasts warned viewers that the U.S. was on the verge of looking like world’s worst “authoritarian regimes” if the Pentagon followed through on President Trump’s desire to hold a military parade in the nation’s capital.


When the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down nearly 1,200 points on Monday, the three major network news outlets (ABC, CBS, and NBC) dedicated nearly 10 minutes of combined coverage to the drop when they began their evening broadcasts. 24 hours later, the market bounced back and closed with a 500-point rebound, but the networks spent roughly half as much time on the positive news.


While the early February market pullback has spooked some investors and already gained plenty of media attention, it illustrated all too well the broadcast networks’ tendency to cover bad economic news more than good. The networks skipped the vast majority of records as the market climbed throughout 2017 and the beginning of 2018.


Good Morning America anchor George Stephanopoulos tried desperately to connect President Trump with a former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page as a Russian agent working with the Kremlin during an interview on the ABC morning show. However, no matter how hard the former Clinton staffer pressed Page, he didn’t gain any ground in proving his Democrat-agenda-driven talking point.

 

It was only a matter of time before Dr. Shaun Murphy received his first transgender patient. In the February 5 episode of ABC’s The Good Doctor titled “She,” like most of us would, the autistic surgical resident had some difficulty understanding transgenderism. The story concentrates on how the doctors at San Jose St. Bonaventure Hospital deal with the patient’s family.


With the liberal media joining Democrats in the ongoing battle to save DACA and for no border wall, CBS and NBC ignored the killing of Indianapolis Colts linebacker Edwin Jackson at the hands of a drunk-driving illegal immigrant during their popular morning and evening shows Monday. Instead, CBS Evening News hyped Space X launching a Tesla Roadster into space and NBC Nightly News whined about how cold the WINTER Olympics were going to be.


All three networks on Monday broke in with special reports that the stock market plummeted over 1000 points. Yet, it was ABC that spun the bad news as time for Donald Trump to take ownership of the stock market. NBC, which hasn’t exactly promoted the idea that Trump had anything to do with last year’s gains, chided, “In the past, presidents have tried to shy away for taking too much credit for stock market games because on the flip side there's the possibility you own the losses too.” 


“Just because it’s biased, doesn’t mean it’s not true.” That was the assessment from Good Morning America journalists and analysts on Saturday while discussing the intelligence memo released on Friday. Guest Matt Dowd touted the already tired “Al Capone vault” comparison. 


When the Dow Jones Industrial Average “nosedived” by nearly 666 points on Feb. 2, it got plenty of network attention. In fact, it got more coverage than the two huge Dow milestones that preceded it — combined.

Although that one-day selloff was a 2.5 percent drop which followed huge gains, the networks emphasized the “worst week for stocks in two years.” ABC World News Tonight with David Muir, NBC Nightly News and CBS Evening News spent a combined 251 seconds on Feb. 2, covering the markets. Those same three shows spent about 33 percent more time on the selloff than on two major milestones during the prolonged stock market rally.