On Tuesday’s Morning Edition on National Public Radio, they turned to a liberal media eminence to explain just how easily Hillary Clinton is winning this election. Washington Post assistant managing editor David Maraniss was just an “Author” in their online headline. Armed with this authority, Maraniss proceeded to talk exactly like a hyperbolic MSNBC surrogate for the Clintons, claiming that Trump’s jail quip in the second debate proved Trump was “against everying about American democracy” and represented the view of a “tin-pot dictatorship in which politicians jail the other side.”



On Thursday's Morning Edition, National Public Radio host Steve Inskeep interviewed New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet regarding the paper’s provocative decision to overturn journalistic convention in the wake of Donald Trump’s success and to start reporting his alleged misstatements as “lies.” But when asked about HIllary, Baquet apparently forgot Clinton's 25 years of public prevarication: “I think all politicians obfuscate, exaggerate, etc. I think that that's what I would say about Hillary Clinton and most other politicians....I don't think Hillary Clinton, to be honest, has crossed the line the way Donald Trump did with the birther issue.”



Three panelists on ABC's This Week on Sunday all agreed that the latest development in Hillary Clinton's e-mail scandal will impact her campaign negatively. Matthew Dowd asserted that the FBI's release of their interview notes was "really damaging...the majority of the country doesn't trust her; and this only adds to that problem." Steve Inskeep acknowledged that the issue is "a thing that people can grab onto." L.Z. Granderson bluntly contended that "the e-mail thing is just...terrible — especially when you start looking at the rationale....it only makes you look silly."



The one-time ABC Sunday hosting duo of Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts appeared together on Tuesday morning on NPR's Morning Edition to discuss convention history. Roberts is still an NPR analyst. They began with the 1964 GOP convention, and Donaldson said "I think this was the first convention of the modern Republican hard-right conservatism." Roberts said "Absolutely right," noting "Nelson Rockefeller got booed."

Roberts said after 1964 and the passage of the Civil Rights Act, the Republican Party "became much more racist" and Donaldson joked in his usual way that Lyndon Johnson's fight for desegregation gave the South to the Republicans "forever!"



National Public Radio’s Steve Inskeep was back at it by scoring another interview with one of his favorite subjects in President Obama (with the transcript released on July 1) and included questions from the left on immigration reform, Donald Trump threatening to stand in Obama’s way of becoming a leftist Ronald Reagan, and white privilege being a centerpiece of the 2016 election.



When NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep isn’t offering gentle interviews to President Obama and comparing him to Abe Lincoln when interviewing his aides, he goes out and interviews journalists who say that Obama is “the greatest terrorist hunter in the history of the American presidency.”

The journalist was Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic, who's written a very long 20,000-word opus on "The Obama Doctrine," and as usual, the president grants access in exchange for gush: 



The Hill newspaper carried this headline on Monday: “Poll: Only 15 percent say they have benefited from ObamaCare.” Sarah Ferris reported just 15 percent of people say they have personally benefited from ObamaCare, although more than one-third believe it has helped the people of their state, according to an NPR poll released Monday, while 26 percent said they have been personally harmed .

That's not at all the way NPR reported its own poll on Monday.



NPR’s Steve Inskeep continued his media tour on Monday promoting his fawning sit-down interview with President by appearing with CNN Tonight host Don Lemon and, when asked about the President attacking the media for supposedly overhyping threats posed by ISIS, Inskeep stood up for the President by suggesting that it was “not a very outlandish idea that he's putting out there.”



Talking to NPR’s Steve Inskeep on MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports, fill-in anchor Luke Russert congratulated the Morning Edition host for teeing up the President to slam Republican critics as racist in a recent interview. A clip played of Inskeep asking the President: “Do you feel over seven years that you’ve come to understand why it is that some ordinary people in America believe or fear that you are trying to change the country in some way that they cannot accept?”



NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is a big fan of President Obama, and when he interviews him, he helpfully sets him up. In a recent interview on race relations, Inskeep added little prompts instead of questions. That’s not what Ted Cruz received on Wednesday’s show. Inskeep was blunt when discussing the new Trump idea of banning Muslims from entering America: "Which Muslims do you want to keep out of the United States?"

NPR posted the full transcript online. What that demonstrated was that NPR and Inskeep routinely sliced out (for time and surely, for political convenience) Cruz whacking away at Democrats and explaining what's wrong with Islamism.



The police-bashing community organizers known as the “Black Lives Matter” movement have a healthy contingent of completely biased black journalist/publicists. Gene Demby, brought into National Public Radio to agitate in the racial “Code Switch” project, wrote a 3,900-word essay for the NPR website and appeared on Friday’s Morning Edition to discuss how depressing it is to travel from cop victim to cop victim.

Anchor Steve Inskeep set Demby up to explain the toll of "How Black Reporters Report On Black Death" and why objectivity was a dishonest white construct on this taxpayer-funded network:



NPR Morning Edition anchor interviewed President Obama about just two topics: the Iran deal and race relations. On Wednesday’s morning show, Inskeep began with a question from the radical left – from black professor and MSNBC host Michael Eric Dyson – and then just prompted the president instead of really asking questions. 

Dyson wrote a column for The New York Times going after the usual allegedly racist suspects: “The right wing had made furious efforts to demonize him as a man unworthy of assuming the mantle of national leadership. The assaults from political figures who portrayed him as a cipher, or a monkey or, later, the police officers who cracked jokes at his expense, proved the toxic atmosphere.” That’s not the section Inskeep quoted.