Liberal economist Paul Krugman initially predicted a doomsday scenario for markets following President Donald Trump’s election on Nov. 8, 2016. Krugman initially stated in The New York Times live election blog that “[i]t really does now look like President Donald J. Trump, and markets are plunging. When might we expect them to recover?” Krugman further suggested that “If the question is when markets will recover, a first-pass answer is never."



New York Times reporter Katie Rogers rebuked President Trump for his use of the word “treason” to attack his political enemies on Twitter in “As Impeachment Inquiry Advances, President’s Language Takes a Dark Turn.” Rogers was critical of Trump’s overheated Twitter account, where he has been attacking Democrats, including House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, who’s leading the impeachment inquiry.



Shelby Talcott at the Daily Caller reports New York Times columnist and Nobel Prize winner Paul Krugman was making wild and silly prdictions again, this time about the Trump impeachment attempt: "Starting to look like two possible outcomes: Trump and a number of others end up in jail, or thousands of journalists end up in prison camps." Don't worry: this is the same genius who predicted global recession and a never-recovering stock market under Trump.



New York Times reporter Jeremy Peters marked 10 years since the launch of the Tea Party movement, which spread with huge yet peaceful rallies against encroaching federal government, specifically Obamacare. Needless to say, the landmark was greeted in hostile fashion by the paper. The headline gave this backhanded compliment: “Tea Party Failed to Tame Deficits, but It Succeeded in Fueling Rage.” Peters launched his account with loaded language that stereotyped limited government Tea Party advocates as crazed, angry, and (after pressure from liberal readers) racist radicals.



New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has twice in one week put his brand of classless leftist vulgarity on display after a national tragedy, this time by using the El Paso massacre to accuse Republicans of being terrorists and white supremacists. “Useful Idiots And Trumpist Billionaires" used a Trump fundraiser by the owner of Equinox and SoulCycle to claim Trump is trying to raise a "white nationalist regime." Last week Krugman said "the G.O.P. has become a systematic enabler of terrorism."



Left-wing economist and columnist Paul Krugman attacked President Donald Trump’s tax cuts as “the biggest giveaway to other nations since the Marshall Plan” in his New York Times column July 25. He criticized Trump’s “hidden” program for sending about $40 billion a year to “wealthy foreign investors.” Forbes contributor and freelance journalist Simon Constable, who has written for many financial publications, wasn’t having any of it. He chided Krugman for getting hold of “the wrong stick entirely” regarding Trump’s corporate tax cuts. 



Paul Krugman smeared the entire Republican Party as far-right and un-American in his Friday New York Times column, “The S Word, the F Word and the Election -- Guess which party is really un-American.” He ranted on: "Basically, if we saw something like America’s Republicans in another country, we’d classify them as white nationalist extremists."



NYT columnist Paul Krugman just can’t get one right these days. After blasting rural America as a bunch of backward racists, the bitter economist recently took to Twitter to voice his displeasure that President Trump awarded Tiger Woods with the Medal of Freedom, cheapening the honor by insinuating the Woods is a lame choice compared to all the important people receiving the honor before him.



Perhaps sore about the unflattering attention he received from his previous month’s column, suggesting that white rural Americans were beyond help, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has a follow up arguing that it’s actually conservatives who hate the heartland, arguing that "disparaging views about middle America are widespread among right-wing intellectuals and, more discreetly, right-wing politicians."



The liberal media launched an offensive against both of President Donald Trump’s selections for the Federal Reserve board of governors.

The media have outdone themselves slinging mud at the “controversial” and “unqualified” picks of economics writer and Club for Growth founder Stephen Moore and millionaire businessman, former CEO and former presidential candidate Herman Cain. Cain also served as a director for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Directors provide “insight on current and emerging issues” in the business community.



New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has given up on helping rural whites, judging from his Tuesday column, “Getting Real About Rural America.” The text box: “Nobody knows how to reverse the heartland’s decline.” To strengthen his attack on rural Americans, Krugman hints that social welfare programs often do no good, an interesting perspective from a liberal economist. He shed crocodile tears for rural America, while passive-aggressively sticking the knife in: "Even then, rural areas and small towns weren’t the 'real America,' somehow morally superior to the rest of us."



Rush Limbaugh’s December 2018 Limbaugh Letter has an article titled “Demonizing White Men.” It highlights -- with actual quotations from people in the media, academia and the political and entertainment arenas -- the attack on white men as a class. You can decide whether these statements are decent, moral or even sensible. Should we support their visions? Don Lemon, a CNN anchorman, said, “We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them.”