Few have defended the Obama administration, and especially Obamacare, as vocally and in my view often unreasonably, as Fox News's Juan Williams. He has gone so far as to call Republican Party opposition to Obamacare its "original sin," and absurdly claimed that "massive opposition" from Republicans is what forced HealthCare.gov's rushed rollout.

One blind spot Williams does not have involves how consistently horribly leftists treat African-American conservatives, or even African-Americans who express an occasional sensibly conservative thought. One reason the left is so brazen in its persecution attempts is its knowledge that no matter how uncivil or unreasonable, their attempts will almost never gain wide exposure in the nation's establishment press. The latest example concerns calls by the faculty at Rutgers University to prevent former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice from her scheduled appearance as commencement speaker there this year. Williams expressed his outrage in a Thursday Fox News column (HT Hot Air; bolds are mine):



In something rarely seen on ABC, NBC, or CBS, two prominent conservative commentators, Laura Ingraham and George Will, appeared on Fox News Sunday on February 9th to discuss the future of the Republican Party as it related to immigration reform.

Appearing alongside panelists Juan Williams and Julie Pace of the Associated Press, Ingraham argued that, “The middle ground on immigration I think is enforcement. Right now we're not really enforcing our laws uniformly. The president as John Boehner just realized apparently is not trustworthy.



On Thurday, Fox News "analyst" Juan Williams and several other liberal journalists met privately and off the record with President Obama.

On Fox News Sunday, Williams went into what apparently are the administration's internal (and perhaps becoming external) talking points about the policy trainwrecks HealthCare.gov and Obamacare in general have become. They are that the Affordable Care Act's failure to gain the support of even one House or Senate Republican is the party's "original sin," and that the program's rollout is an attempt to fix what it inherited — yet another tacit contention which essentially comes down to, "It's Bush's fault."



On Thursday's "special edition" of "Media Mash" on Fox News, Sean Hannity talked to Juan Williams about a meeting of journalists and cable-news hosts he was invited to by the Obama White House. Williams said attendees included MSNBC's Ed Schultz and Lawrence O'Donnell, David Corn of Mother Jones, Howard Fineman of the Huffington Post, and Washington Post bloggers Ezra Klein and Greg Sargent.

MRC president Brent Bozell guessed one idea that wasn't expressed at the meeting was when the president would consent to an interview with tough questions. This came before news of another syrupy sitdown with ABC's Barbara Walters. Has Obama sat down with Fox News since Bill O'Reilly's Super Bowl interview in February of 2011? (Update: Yes, with Chris Wallace in September, all about Syria.)



On Tuesday's Fox News Special report, contributor Juan Williams lamely tried to excuse away the mind-boggling incompetence of the HealthCare.gov rollout by claiming that "massive opposition (to Obamacare) from the Republicans" caused fearful system architects to "roll it out and see how it works for now."

Juan's haughty huffiness was so absurd that the Fox News panel was caught slack-jawed and barely challenged him. That's not what happened Sunday morning on Chris Wallace's Fox News Sunday broadcast when Williams tried to claim that millions of people losing their individual health care coverage are going to be better off with Obamacare policies (video and transscript follow the jump; bolds are mine; HT to Mediaite via Twitchy):



Last night on Fox News's Special Report, Juan Williams singlehandedly raised the bar for what qualifies as world-class failure in blame-shifting. Williams excused the mind-boggling incompetence of the Obama administration's HealthCare.gov implementation by claiming that "massive opposition (to Obamacare) from the Republicans" caused fearful system architects to "roll it out and see how it works for now." Gosh, the only thing that remains is for President Obama to say that these poor programmers were "held hostage" by GOP press releases and speeches.

Video and a transcript of the relevant segment follow the jump (HT Twitchy via Hot Air; bolds are mine). Especially note the priceless look on the face of Fox panel member Stephen Hayes at the 1:12 mark of the two-minute vid:



“MSNBC, I don't think they even have any pretense of balance at this point. I mean, goodness gracious.”

So marvelously said Juan Williams on Fox News’s MediaBuzz Sunday (video follows with transcript and commentary):



George Will made a statement Tuesday that I sincerely wish every American on both sides of the aisle would pay attention to - especially members of the media.

Appearing on Fox News’s Special Report, Will accurately said, “Default is a choice.”



Former George W. Bush press secretary Dana Perino is becoming quite a star at Fox.

After Juan Williams made a bizarre claim on Fox News Sunday that conservatives "live in a very small bubble including a media bubble," Perino fired back, "Juan, Democrats and the liberals live in the biggest mainstream media bubble ever created in the history of the universe" (video follows with transcript and absolutely no need for additional commentary):



When Gary Knell became the chief executive officer of National Public Radio in December of 2011, his goal was to “calm the waters” after the publicly funded network had endured two high-profile scandals: the firing of Juan Williams and the video of a fund-raising executive slamming the Republican Party as “seriously racist, racist people” while accepting donations from a group that was purportedly aligned with the Muslim Brotherhood.

But on Monday, 20 months later, Knell announced his decision to join the National Geographic Society as its president and CEO, even though that meant leaving NPR, which he said "is and will always be a beacon of journalistic integrity, commitment, and courage,” a claim NewsBusters has repeatedly demonstrated as false.



Laura Bassett at The Huffington Post reported Tuesday that Fox Business would not air a TV advertisement by the feminist group Ultraviolet that called for the termination of Fox contributors Lou Dobbs, Erick Erickson, and Juan Williams.

"Lou Dobbs has a problem," an announcer declares in the ad, over tiny out-of-context clips of the men speaking. "Women are winning the bread. Even his own network isn't safe from this source of lady breadwinners. Tell Fox to retire Lou Dobbs, Erick Erickson, and Juan Williams and spare them the pain of equality." 



On Tuesday's Fox & Friends, Fox News contributor and Emmy-winning journalist Juan Williams accused the Obama Justice Department of having "criminalized journalism" by investigating Fox News correspondent James Rosen. Williams claimed that such probing by the administration “makes it difficult for journalists to do business” and posed the question, “How do you do journalism if you are treated as a criminal for asking for information?” [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

This revelation, of course, comes close on the heels of the DOJ seizing phone and email records of several Associated Press employees during a leak investigation concerning a CIA operation to foil a terror bomb plot. However, in the Rosen case, the Justice Department has “specifically gone after Rosen and Fox as co-conspirators in the case,” according to Williams, whereas “there is no such listing of AP as a co-conspirator.” In all his years of reporting, Williams said that this particular case against Rosen “stands out in a bright way to me” because it shows that the administration is trying to criminalize certain types of reporting.