After his appearance yesterday on ABC's "This Week," Hillary Clinton may be wondering whose side James Carville is on.

Never mind Carville's frequent and rude interruptions of other guests, his seemingly calculated incoherence, and his false claims about the Clintons' past record of corruption. Even though that behavior doesn't represent the Clintons well, they have to know that's part of the package when they use Carville as a defender. What wasn't expected is that Mr. Mary Matalin would admit that Mrs. Clinton may have set up her private server at her home in Chappaqua, New York specifically to hamper any future efforts by congress to carry out its consitutionally assigned oversight functions. But he did, as will be seen after the jump.



On Tuesday morning, the big three (ABC, CBS, NBC) networks continued to play-up the supposed controversy surrounding a letter signed by 47 Republican senators to the leaders of Iran regarding its negotiations with the Obama administration over its nuclear program. CBS This Morning did its best to promote the harshest critics with Jeff Glor introducing the network’s coverage by declaring “[i]n Washington this morning Democrats are denouncing a letter to Iran signed by most of the 54 Republican Senators. This morning's New York Daily News headline calls those Republicans 'traitors.'”



On Sunday, George Stephanopoulos appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America to discuss the 2016 presidential election and what impact Hillary Clinton’s use of private emails might have on the race. Stephanopoulos did his best to cast doubt on the importance of the Clinton emails and argued that “it’s not going bring down her campaign and I think it does raise questions about a pattern of kind of hunkering down in the Clinton world. We'll also see if her critics overreact on this one." 



Good Morning America co-host George Stephanopoulos admitted on Tuesday that, when he first started, even his fellow colleagues at ABC News wondered if he could be objective. Talking to Alec Baldwin for the actor's radio show Here's The Thing, recounted how, in 1997, Ted Koppel "came to my office and looked me in the eye and asked me why I'm here and if I really felt I could, sort of, do the job, be fair and be objective." 



According to Good Morning America's Jon Karl on Thursday, Hillary Clinton will ask Americans to simply trust her when it comes to the growing scandal regarding her e-mails as Secretary of State. Talking to George Stephanopoulos, Karl conceded, "George, this is basically going to be the honor system." 



Continuing to hype a possible "shutdown" of the Homeland Security Department if Congress did not approve funding by Friday, Tuesday's network morning shows all seized on White House talking points that any delay in funding would threaten national security and placed blame for the budget impasse squarely on Republicans.



On Saturday and Sunday, ABC’s Good Morning America and NBC’s Today continued to play up the ongoing controversy surrounding comments made by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani in which he questioned President Obama’s love of America. Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd went so far as to suggest that some Republicans fear the New York City mayor had caused the “issue of race” to pop up.



George Stephanopoulos won an award for journalism? The former Democratic operative turned host of a show known for cat videos hyped his award for "excellence in broadcast journalism." Good Morning America's Amy Robach touted, "We can't help but give a big congratulations to one of our own. George took home the top award at last night's National Press Foundation Dinner." 



On Sunday, ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos discussed the fallout from the Brian Williams controversy with two prominent media critics, both of whom agreed that NBC News had badly handled Williams’ false claim that his helicopter came under enemy fire while he was reporting from Iraq in 2003. Liz Spayd, editor and publisher of the Columbia Journalism Review, insisted that NBC’s internal investigation won’t provide “enough credibility that gets attached to that kind of an investigation when the people doing it no doubt have personal connections, personal relationships with Brian Williams.” 



While the ABC, NBC, and CBS morning shows on Tuesday all jumped on potential Republican 2016 contenders Chris Christie and Rand Paul being sympathetic toward parents skeptical of child vaccinations, all three broadcast networks ignored Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton holding the same positions in 2008.



Leading off an interview with Bobby Jindal on ABC's This Week on Sunday, host George Stephanopoulos played a clip of the Louisiana governor and potential Republican 2016 contender speaking about his faith during a religious event on Saturday: "We can't just elect a candidate and fix what ails our country. We can't just pass a law and fix what ails our country. We need a spiritual revival to fix what ails our country. It is like God has given us the book of life....And on the last page, our God wins."



Over the weekend, Congressman Steve King (R-IA) hosted the Iowa Freedom Summit, which featured several potential Republican presidential candidates and on Sunday's ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, Cokie Roberts, correspondent for NPR, eagerly took a shot at the gathering of influential conservatives. Speaking during the show’s panel discussion, Roberts slammed the GOP event and insisted that “Republicans should stay out of Iowa altogether. What happens to them is that they get pushed so far to the right in those venues that it gives them a terrible time in the general election.”