Over the weekend, Congressman Steve King (R-IA) hosted the Iowa Freedom Summit, which featured several potential Republican presidential candidates and on Sunday's ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, Cokie Roberts, correspondent for NPR, eagerly took a shot at the gathering of influential conservatives. Speaking during the show’s panel discussion, Roberts slammed the GOP event and insisted that “Republicans should stay out of Iowa altogether. What happens to them is that they get pushed so far to the right in those venues that it gives them a terrible time in the general election.”  



All three networks on Friday morning promoted Barack Obama's "interesting," "unconventional" interviews with YouTube personalities, including one who is famous for taking a bath in milk and Fruit Loops. One question was very similar a query from ABC journalist Barbara Walters in 2011.  



On Tuesday night, President Obama gave his sixth State of the Union address, and on Wednesday morning, ABC and CBS did their best to boost his speech and tout his liberal agenda to their audiences. During their respective broadcasts, ABC’s Good Morning America and NBC’s Today made sure to play up Obama’s “renewed swagger” by giving an “aggressive speech” to Congress and America. ABC’s Jonathan Karl, ABC News Chief White House Correspondent, went so far as to declare Obama “seemed so confident you would have thought he had just won another election.” 



During ABC’s preview of the State of the Union, former Democratic operative turned journalist George Stephanopoulos, Jon Karl and Matt Dowd pre-hyped a “triumphant” Obama and his “I told you so attitude” towards Republicans.



Without laughing, ABC’s George Stephanopoulos on Tuesday’s World News Tonight advanced the White House hope that Barack Obama will be seen as Ronald Reagan was in 1987, as a President who rescued the economy and was rewarded by voters.



Good Morning America journalists on Monday eagerly promoted good news for Barack Obama. Co-host George Stephanopoulos hyped an ABC News/Washington Post survey "showing the President going to a pretty high approval ratings, going up to 50 percent, the highest he's had in 18 months." 



Tuesday night, Barack Obama delivers his second-to-last State of the Union address, this time as a lame duck President with relatively low approval ratings and facing a Congress entirely controlled by the opposition party. But if history is a guide, he can count on encouraging reviews from many in the establishment media.



On Wednesday, ABC’s Good Morning America had a segment that promoted how, due to budget cuts, the IRS will be forced to “delay those refund checks,” “increase the risk of identity theft,” conduct “46,000 fewer audits,” and maintain an “IRS help line” that “is going to become much less helpful.”

Co-host George Stephanopoulos lamented about “fewer audits means less revenue to the Treasury” to run the federal government and then asked ABC News chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl if there was “any chance that this can get fixed this year or is it a lost cause for this year.”



NBC's Today on Tuesday offered a scant ten seconds to the White House's backpedaling on skipping the massive anti-terror rally in France. In contrast, ABC's Good Morning America heralded the admission as "rapid" and "remarkable." 



On Sunday, ABC’s This Week took some time away from discussing the horrific terrorist attack in France to examine the 2016 presidential landscape. The panel featured Robert Reich, liberal economist and former Labor Secretary under President Clinton, former Clinton official James Carville, and liberal GOP strategists Nicolle Wallace and Ana Navarro, all four of whom warned the GOP against running against President Obama in the 2016 election. During the panel discussion, Nicolle Wallace warned “Republicans would be wise to make this about the future and, you know, I don't recommend that any of them run against Obama, they should run against whoever their opponent is.” 



This week the media greeted the new GOP Congress with fears about a conservative “kamikaze caucus,” pushing “confrontation with Obama,” and stressed that if Republicans were to be successful they needed to look less “scary,” as they pointed out the 114th Congress was “80 percent white, 80 percent male and 92 percent of its members are Christian.” But in 2007, when Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats took over the House, the tone from the liberal media was very different.



All three networks on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning worried if yet another addition to the Bush "dynasty" will be good for the country. Yet, these same networks were excited earlier this year about the continuation of the Clinton brand.