A certain level of worry permeated the coverage for the launch of Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign. The three networks on Friday at least noted stumbles the Democrat has had in 2015, though ABC failed to specifically mention the e-mail server controversy. Former Bill Clinton operative turned Good Morning America co-host George Stephanopoulos conceded that Mrs. Clinton "has some work to do." 



ABC on Monday continued to assail Indiana's religious freedom law, hyping the "firestorm" over a law that "many" say could "legalize discrimination." Good Morning America co-host Robin Roberts trumpeted "growing calls to move the men's Final Four and boycott the state over the new law that many say legalizes discrimination." 



On Sunday, This Week moderator George Stephanopoulos interviewed Indiana Governor Mike Pence and repeatedly pressed him for defending his state's religious freedom bill, and touted the argument that it was an anti-gay law. Throughout the combative interview, the liberal ABC anchor repeatedly wondered “if a florist in Indiana refuses to serve a gay couple at their wedding, is that legal now in Indiana?” 



On Monday night and Tuesday morning, all three networks covered the down-to-the-wire election in Israel. But only CBS noticed that Barack Obama's 2012 national field director is hard at work trying to defeat Benjamin Netanyahu. This Morning reporter Barry Peterson explained that the left-leaning Labor Party "hired Jeremy Bird who ran the Obama campaign ground game in 2008 and 2012." 



While both ABC's Good Morning America and CBS This Morning on Monday covered the latest developments in the Hillary Clinton e-mail scandal and the Clinton Foundation accepting money from foreign governments, NBC's Today didn't bother to update viewers on either of the controversies continuing to swirl around the likely 2016 contender.



After his appearance yesterday on ABC's "This Week," Hillary Clinton may be wondering whose side James Carville is on.

Never mind Carville's frequent and rude interruptions of other guests, his seemingly calculated incoherence, and his false claims about the Clintons' past record of corruption. Even though that behavior doesn't represent the Clintons well, they have to know that's part of the package when they use Carville as a defender. What wasn't expected is that Mr. Mary Matalin would admit that Mrs. Clinton may have set up her private server at her home in Chappaqua, New York specifically to hamper any future efforts by congress to carry out its consitutionally assigned oversight functions. But he did, as will be seen after the jump.



On Tuesday morning, the big three (ABC, CBS, NBC) networks continued to play-up the supposed controversy surrounding a letter signed by 47 Republican senators to the leaders of Iran regarding its negotiations with the Obama administration over its nuclear program. CBS This Morning did its best to promote the harshest critics with Jeff Glor introducing the network’s coverage by declaring “[i]n Washington this morning Democrats are denouncing a letter to Iran signed by most of the 54 Republican Senators. This morning's New York Daily News headline calls those Republicans 'traitors.'”



On Sunday, George Stephanopoulos appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America to discuss the 2016 presidential election and what impact Hillary Clinton’s use of private emails might have on the race. Stephanopoulos did his best to cast doubt on the importance of the Clinton emails and argued that “it’s not going bring down her campaign and I think it does raise questions about a pattern of kind of hunkering down in the Clinton world. We'll also see if her critics overreact on this one." 



Good Morning America co-host George Stephanopoulos admitted on Tuesday that, when he first started, even his fellow colleagues at ABC News wondered if he could be objective. Talking to Alec Baldwin for the actor's radio show Here's The Thing, recounted how, in 1997, Ted Koppel "came to my office and looked me in the eye and asked me why I'm here and if I really felt I could, sort of, do the job, be fair and be objective." 



According to Good Morning America's Jon Karl on Thursday, Hillary Clinton will ask Americans to simply trust her when it comes to the growing scandal regarding her e-mails as Secretary of State. Talking to George Stephanopoulos, Karl conceded, "George, this is basically going to be the honor system." 



Continuing to hype a possible "shutdown" of the Homeland Security Department if Congress did not approve funding by Friday, Tuesday's network morning shows all seized on White House talking points that any delay in funding would threaten national security and placed blame for the budget impasse squarely on Republicans.



On Saturday and Sunday, ABC’s Good Morning America and NBC’s Today continued to play up the ongoing controversy surrounding comments made by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani in which he questioned President Obama’s love of America. Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd went so far as to suggest that some Republicans fear the New York City mayor had caused the “issue of race” to pop up.