Monday on ABC’s Good Morning America, the network continued blasting Republicans and President Trump for the government shutdown while defending Democrats, touting their new poll which showed more Americans blamed the GOP instead of Democrats for the shutdown. However ABC’s credibility is shot on who is to blame for government shutdowns, as they tend to blame Republicans for shutdowns no matter who is in office.



In perhaps the least surprising thing to happen thus far in 2019, President Donald Trump’s Tuesday night address was not well received by the broadcast networks of ABC, CBS, and NBC (and particularly the first and third ones). Anchors, hosts, and correspondents panned it as inaccurate, full of fear-mongering, and then offered little to no criticism of the Democratic response by Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.



On Tuesday’s Good Morning America, the network’s White House correspondent Jonathan Karl sat down with Vice President Mike Pence to grill him about President Trump not backing down on the border wall, laying blame for the government shutdown exclusively on him. Despite Democrats being unwilling to budge on the need for border security, the ABC reporter seethed to Pence that it was Trump’s fault that we were “in this mess.”



ABC and CBS carried Special Reports Thursday afternoon as Democrats took control in the House of Representatives and neither could contain their excitement for what they were “feel[ing] here in the halls” as “a new era” began, causing “an earthquake in Trump world” and supposedly putting the Senate and White House on the defensive due to the midterm national popular vote.



As 2012 Republican nominee Mitt Romney released an op-ed attacking President Trump in the Washington Post January 1, the networks couldn’t help but rave over the president’s potential opponent in 2020. Revealing their hypocrisy, ABC and NBC had plenty of time to praise Romney, when they held contempt for him before he became a critic of the president.



To their credit, ABC's Good Morning America marked Christmas morning by having in three Christian pastors to discuss the life of Christ and the Christmas message. The guests were Episcopal bishop Michael Curry (he appeared all over television), Rev. Heidi Neumark of Trinity Lutheran Church in Manhattan, and Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York City.  ABC host George Stephanopoulos threw immigration into the discussion, and a "global crisis of refugees." Rev. Neumark, who learned she had Jewish ancestry after years as a Lutheran pastor, didn't mention President Trump by name, but compared immigrants at our border to Jesus and his family.



Appearing on ABC’s Good Morning America on Wednesday to promote her new movie, Vice, an unflattering biopic about former Vice President Dick Cheney, actress Amy Adams laughably claimed that the nasty far-left hit piece focused on “finding the humanity in people who think differently than we do.”



On Monday, the network morning shows were replete with doomsday predictions as anchors and correspondents hyperventilated over a Texas federal judge ruling ObamaCare to be unconstitutional. Rather than report on the substance of the judge’s ruling or the numerous problems with the controversial health care law, reporters instead behaved like Democratic Party operatives as they trashed Republicans and touted former President Obama joining the political fray.



George Stephanopoulos had a mishap on the set of ABC’s This Week on Sunday when Matt Schlapp of the American Conservative Union (and the lone conservative on the panel) clashed with liberal ABC commentator Roland Martin during the Powerhouse Roundtable. And after hearing Schlapp’s opinion about the plethora of investigations into President Trump, host and Clinton lackey George Stephanopoulos was so upset he accidentally flung his microphone under the desk.



ABC started off Friday’s Good Morning America playing clips from their exclusive interview with President Trump’s ex-lawyer Michael Cohen, who was sentenced to three years in prison this week for lying to Congress about Trump’s business dealings with Russia and for directing hush money payments to Trump’s alleged former mistresses Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal, before the 2016 election.

Despite his dishonest reputation, Cohen was treated like a hero by ABC anchor George Stephanopoulos, who praised him for his “honesty” while inviting him to bash the president.

 


When Democratic leaders pass away, the liberal media prefer to treat them like saints and pretend rougher points didn’t exist. But that standard doesn’t apply to Republicans ones as the largely liberal panel on ABC’s This Week demonstrated on Sunday, where faux Republican commentator Matthew Dowd decried people who wanted to “canonize” the late George H.W. Bush, who passed away Friday night.



New York Times writer Amanda Hess issued surprise criticism of the media’s coverage of Bill Clinton’s sex scandals in her review of The Clinton Affair, A&E’s six-part mini-series on Bill Clinton’s scandal over White House intern Monica Lewinsky. Hess argued that the women who accused the former president of sexual harassment were unjustly mocked and shunned by the mainstream press: “Paula Jones Re-emerges In New Light – A time to listen to the women of the Bill Clinton scandals.” It’s sound advice from Hess, but 20 years too late for the partisan New York Times, which dismissed Juanita Broaddrick’s credible allegations of rape against Clinton as “toxic waste.