Leave it to MSNBC to twist the rhetoric of the Tea Party following Thad Cochran’s upset of Chris McDaniel in the June 24 Mississippi runoff. On Tuesday's Now, host Alex Wagner and David Corn of Mother Jones both strongly suggested that racism is the reason why the Tea Party objected to thousands of Democrats pushing Cochran to victory.

Wagner sneered, “This is particularly pointed for the Republican Party, not just because it's Republican versus Republican but the votes they are questioning are predominantly black votes.” She then took things up a notch, claiming that the Tea Party views black voters as illegitimate: [MP3 audio here; video below]



Chris Matthews’ disdain for House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) and his decision to sue President Obama over his use of executive orders reached a fever pitch on his Hardball program Monday night. 

Speaking to David Corn of the liberal Mother Jones and Howard Fineman of The Huffington Post, Matthews maintained that Speaker Boehner’s lawsuit “is the kind of Mickey Mouse that goes on in third world countries before they have a coup because people were just sick of it.” [See video below.]



On the June 25 edition of Hardball, fill-in host Steve Kornacki and his guests discussed the implications of Thad Cochran’s surprising upset of Chris McDaniel in the Mississippi GOP Senate runoff. The panel mocked the Tea Party’s outrage at Thad Cochran over his courting of Democratic voters in the primary.

Kornacki laughed off Chris McDaniel’s assertion that the outcome was unbecoming of the party of Ronald Reagan, explaining: “That is the same Ronald Reagan who we named the Reagan Democrats after because he cultivated all that Democratic support when he ran for President.” David Corn agreed, criticizing the Tea Party because the “Republican Party has been trying to get black people to vote for them for a long time, and finally when it happens Tea Partiers get upset.” [MP3 audio; video below]



This past week was the biggest in a long time for Benghazi news. How did some of the leading lights of the lefty blogosphere handle the Ben Rhodes e-mail and related topics? We report; you decide.

1. David Corn of Mother Jones, best known for bringing to light the Mitt Romney 47-percent tape, wrote on Friday that the Rhodes e-mail is "pretty standard stuff" and that "all the fuss about [it]...is smoke, not fire." Corn admits that the White House "certainly has bungled part of its Benghazi reaction" but that the Republicans' case nonetheless "should have been...closed, a long time back."



How do we know that the tea party has become a force that can't be shrugged away in the five years since it emerged? When liberals in media smear tea partiers with ludicrous, over-the-top comparisons.

Appearing on Ed Schultz's radio show, Mother Jones reporter David Corn rendered himself incapable of being taken seriously when he likened the tea party to one of the most depraved criminals to appear in film, the Joker in the Batman movies. (Audio after the jump)



As NewsBusters previously reported, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews devoted his entire Christmas Eve Hardball show to mercilessly attacking eleven conservatives with the assistance from a panel of some of the most conservative-hating liberals in the nation.

The folks at MSNBC must have really liked this show, for they actually reran it in its entirety Monday.



Most Americans view Christmas as a time to consider such lofty things as peace on earth and good will toward men.

Not MSNBC’s Chris Matthews who actually devoted his entire Christmas Eve Hardball show to mercilessly attacking eleven conservatives with assistance from a panel of some of the most conservative-hating liberals in the nation (video follows with transcript and commentary):



"The Odd Couple" sitcom, which featured slob sportswriter Oscar Madison (Jack Klugman) sharing a New York City apartment with overbearing neatnik Felix Ungar (Tony Randall), rarely fell short in delivering funny lines, but one in particular has stayed with me in the decades since the show aired.

Felix was lecturing Oscar, as he so often did, that what he was doing -- smoking cigars, eating junk food, playing late-night poker with his buddies, whatever -- was unhealthy. "Oscar, you know that's not good for you." Oscar's response?  "When I look back on the best times in my life, none of them were good for me." (Audio after the jump)



Talk about calling a spade a spade.

On MSNBC's NOW Wednesday, PBS's Jeff Greenfield called host Alex Wagner as well as the MSNBC contributors on the panel - David Corn, Joy Reid, and Katrina vanden Heuvel - "advocates" (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Earlier this afternoon, my NewsBusters colleague Kyle Drennen highlighted the Today show’s effort to hype the recent feud between Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.) and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.). Unsurprisingly, the folks at MSNBC were even more eager to blow the dispute out of proportion – and to predict a nasty fight between Republicans in 2016.

Now host Alex Wagner kicked off a gleeful Wednesday segment on the feud, claiming the “2016 Republican clown car has already started revving its engines.” Wagner also suggested the “spat” would expose “deep divisions within the GOP,” echoing similar remarks made by NBC’s Peter Alexander on Wednesday’s Today.



MSNBC’s Martin Bashir just might be the most biased and intellectually dishonest person to anchor a so-called “news” program on television today.

On the show hilariously bearing his name Thursday, Bashir actually asked a liberal guest, “Is Darrell Issa determined to become the most repugnant politician in the history of American politics, or has he already achieved that feat?” (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Former President George W. Bush has kept a low profile in his years after office, preferring to focus on personal reflection and veterans' causes since leaving the presidency in 2009. But that didn't keep a left-wing panel on MSNBC from using Bush's recent bike ride with wounded veterans to blast his presidency, though.

Alex Wagner, who anchors the noontime Now program on the Lean Forward network, introduced a segment on Friday's program about Bush's annual mountain bike ride with wounded veterans around his ranch in Texas. But she quickly turned the nonpartisan cause into a sneering criticism of the former president's intelligence and decision-making, with nary a word of praise for the charity work: