As liberal CNN political commentator and former Barack Obama advisor David Axelrod appeared as a guest on Thursday's New Day, CNN co-anchor Alisyn Camerota brought up accusations by Hillary Clinton press secretary Brian Fallon that the inspector general investigating the Clinton email scandal is "in cahoots" with congressional Republicans, and questioned the logic of such a claim.



David Axelrod is jumping ship to CNN.  After serving as a senior political analyst for MSNBC and NBC since 2013, Axelrod will make the move to CNN as a senior political commentator. 

Prior to his work at the Lean Forward network, Axelrod was best known for his role as a senior advisor to Obama during the president’s first term, and playing an important role in getting Obama elected twice. 



After all three network morning newscasts dedicated time on Wednesday to the release of the latest batch of Hillary Clinton e-mails, their evening news counterparts saw things differently by choosing to ignore the story altogether. With ABC, CBS, and NBC missing in action on this Clinton scandal, the Fox News Channel (FNC) program Special Report led off its Wednesday show with a thorough, four-minute-and-two-second segment on the e-mails from chief White House correspondent Ed Henry from the State Department.



On Monday, Katie Couric, former CBS Evening News anchor and current Yahoo Global News anchor, sat down with David Axelrod, former senior advisor to President Obama, to discuss his memoir Believer: My Forty Years in Politics.



By yesterday afternoon, the Obama administration recognized that it had a serious problem on its hands. Zeke Miller at Time.com reported that 2008 presidential campaign manager and longtime adviser David Axelord's book revealed that, in Miller's words, "Barack Obama misled Americans for his own political benefit when he claimed in the 2008 election to oppose same sex marriage for religious reasons." Obama never opposed same-sex marriage, but acted on advice from Axelrod and others to act as if he did during the campaign.

Axelrod's claim generated enough coverage that Team Obama knew that even the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, was going to have to do some kind of story on his adviser's revelation. So how to do damage control without creating the kind of stir which would force the network broadcasters to inform low-information voters of the core deception? That's easy. Throw all pretenses of presidential dignity out the window and go to (holy moly) Buzzfeed.



In his story on Brian Williams at 10:55 p.m. ET Tuesday, Gabriel Sherman at New York Magazine reported that the now-suspended anchor and his agent "were presented with a dossier of Williams' apparent lies," and that "Williams himself was only slowly grasping the depths of the mess he'd created."

That begs the obvious question of whether the public will ever get to know what's in that "dossier," and what impact its contents may have had on the substance of NBC's news reports during the past dozen (if not more) years. Excerpts from Sherman's report follow the jump (links are in original; bolds are mine):



In a new book, Obama 2008 campaign manager and longtime Obama adviser David Axelrod reveals that, in the words of Zeke J. Miller at Time.com, "Barack Obama misled Americans for his own political benefit when he claimed in the 2008 election to oppose same sex marriage for religious reasons."

The subheadline at Miller's coverage calls it "A striking admission of political dishonesty from the keeper of the Obama flame." In my view, given that David Axelrod wouldn't make such an admission without permission, it's also a juvenile "Nyah-nyah, we fooled you, and you can't do anything about it!" taunt. Additional excerpts from Miller's article follow the jump (HT Michael Walsh at PJ Media; bolds are mine throughout this post):



On Tuesday, CBS This Morning hosted David Axelrod, former senior advisor to President Obama, and treated the former White House official to a friendly interview to help promote his political biography. Throughout the interview, the three CBS hosts lobbed softball questions at Axelrod but refused to ask him about a controversial portion of his book, that they themselves had previously boosted, in which Axelrod claimed that Obama was irritated with Mitt Romney’s concession call in 2012 in which the Republican allegedly suggested the president won by getting out the black vote. 



In an interview with former Obama White House aide David Axelrod on Monday's NBC Today, co-host Savannah Guthrie tossed a softball on "whether racism animated some of the President's critics." She read an inflammatory quote from Axelrod's new book: "Some folks simply refused to accept the legitimacy of the first black president and are seriously discomforted by the growing diversity of our country." Without challenging the assertion, Guthrie wondered: "Is that you view and does the President share that view in your mind?"



After promoting Obama advisor David Axelrod's nasty attack on Mitt Romney on Wednesday, Thursday's CBS This Morning noticed Romney aide Garrett Jackson denouncing the claim as a complete fabrication, with co-host Norah O'Donnell informing viewers: "Jackson told CBS News, 'I just hope this lie is the work of David Axelrod and not the President. It's ridiculous. I was very disappointed they would make that up.'"



During a news brief on Wednesday’s CBS This Morning, co-host Norah O’Donnell promoted David Axelrod, President Obama’s presidential campaign strategist, and his new book in which the Democrat criticizes Mitt Romney following the 2012 presidential campaignThs CBS host played up how in Axelrod’s new book “President Obama was slightly irritated by Mitt Romney’s concession call in 2012...Axelrod claims that when Romney called the Republican suggested the president won by getting out the black vote.”



On Monday, May 12, FNC's Fox and Friends exposed Democratic hypocrisy in accusing Republicans of trying to raise money off the deaths of Americans from the Benghazi attack, when Democrats themselves have a history of linking fundraising to deadly events.

Referring to Republican Rep. Trey Gowdy explaining this hypocrisy on the previous day's Fox News Sunday, FNC co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck began listing the history of Democrats: