Speaking to CNN's Brianna Keilar at a campaign rally for Bernie Sanders, actress and Sports Illustrated model Emily Ratajkowski -- best known for her appearance in Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines video -- bizarrely suggested that Hillary Clinton's politics are too "extreme" to the "right" for her as she explained why she supports Sanders. Ratajkowski: "I think that my initial response to Hillary was a positive one, but, you know, depending on your politics, if you don't agree with some of the things that, you know, I think are pretty extreme and very, very, you know, to the right of where I'd like to see the party headed. It's really that simple to me."



CNN is staying true to its reputation as the "Clinton News Network," even after it released a poll on Tuesday which found that Hillary Clinton is behind competitor Bernie Sanders in New Hampshire by 27 points. The following morning, on Wednesday's CNN Newsroom, Carol Costello spotlighted how Bill Clinton was "about to take the stage to stump for his wife, Hillary Clinton — something, perhaps, that is much needed at this moment, since Hillary Clinton seems to be lagging in some of the polls that are out there."



Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's At This Hour with Berman and Bolduan, CNN political commentator Errol Louis dismissed GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz's assertion that Democrats are more likely to commit violent crimes than Republicans by theorizing that prison converts some GOPers into Democrats because, after spending time in prison, they become "a little bit more respectful toward civil and human rights."



Reporting from inside the spin room following Saturday’s Democratic presidential debate, CNN’s senior political correspondent Brianna Keilar minced no works in describing Hillary Clinton’s comments on 9/11 and her coming of age in the 1960's to two moments that “certainly didn’t go over well” with aides frantically working to “clean-up” after her.



Appearing as a guest on Friday's CNN Newsroom, CNN political analyst Carl Bernstein asserted that "zealots are winning the soul of the Republican Party" as he blamed the "zealots of his party" for Republican House Speaker John Boehner's announced resignation from the House of Representatives.

Moments later, as he praised the Pope's speech to Congress, Bernstein took a shot at Texas Senator Ted Cruz as he suggested that "I don't think the Pope's message had much of an effect on Ted Cruz."



CNN's Brian Todd zeroed in on the "horrifying recent pattern" of criminals murdering police officers during a report on Wednesday's Situation Room. Todd noted that "seven law enforcement officers [were] shot to death in a month – 24 officers shot and killed so far this year across America,"and reported that "the string of killings of officers in recent weeks...has really got the law enforcement community on edge." He also pointed out that "police advocates say a saturation of media coverage has contributed to the spike."



One would think that a presidential candidate falsely claiming that she never was subpoenaed would be bigger news story than people in the opposing party criticizing that candidate after the fact for her obviously false statement. As Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted late this afternoon, that's not the case. This post contains several more examples.

At CNN, the network's own Brianna Keilar, who conducted the interview during which Hillary Clinton denied ever receiving a congressional committee's subpoena for her work-related emails, "sharply criticized the Democratic presidential contender’s performance" for failing to answer several questions satisfactorily and for not even "engaging" when asked others. Despite Keilar's disappointment, beat reporters Jeff Zeleny and Tom LoBianco at CNN.com went light on Mrs. Clinton, and highlighted Republican critics.



Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s first national TV interview aired during Tuesday’s edition of The Situation Room on CNN, and while Brianna Keilar pressed Clinton on her e-mail scandal and tumbling poll numbers, the interview measured up to little more than a stroll in the park. Along with gooey questions about which woman she thinks should go on the $10 bill and who plays a better Hillary Clinton on Saturday Night Live, Keilar came at Clinton from the left on the candidacy of socialist Bernie Sanders and allowed her to pontificate without interruption for over a minute and a half on the work of the scandal-ridden Clinton Foundation.



It was announced on Monday that Hillary Clinton's first national TV interview will go to CNN's Brianna Keilar, a journalist who previously fawned over the Democrat's appearance at Chipotle. Keilar also attended the wedding of a top Clinton aide two weeks ago. On April 14, Keilar hyped, "Yesterday she stopped at a Chipotle, a campaign aide sharing with us that she had a chicken burrito bowl with black beans and guacamole and an iced tea. And you know what that kind of detail tells you — it says, ‘She's just like us. She eats at Chipotle.'"



CNN's Brianna Keilar badgered Republican presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson on Thursday's Wolf program over his recent comment on LGBT issues: "I didn't remember any times when there were signs up that says...gay people have to drink at this fountain. I was a little irritated." Keilar repeatedly asked Carson: "Do you think that gay Americans are discriminated against?" When the candidate refused to give a direct answer, the journalist reprimanded him: "If you're running for president, I think it's fair to ask you this question. Part of being a candidate is to answer questions."



On Monday afternoon, CNN’s Wolf covered the controversy surrounding President Obama’s playing of golf on a Hawaii golf course that forced an Army couple about to be married there to move their wedding during which CNN’s Chris Moody called the optics of the move “hilariously bad.”

Following a panel discussion on the 2016 presidential campaign, substitute host Brianna Keilar introduced the topic and after some background on what happened, Keilar and Time’s Zeke Miller did their best to defend the President and the White House, pointing out that there was “no way that the President” or the White House knew of this decision beforehand by the golf course. 



First, let’s get this straight: By very definition, Hillary Clinton actually did suffer a "traumatic brain injury" in 2012. She fell; she hit her head; she suffered a concussion; and she developed a blood clot which hospitalized her. A concussion is precisely a “traumatic brain injury,” according to official medical definition.

Thus, when Karl Rove indelicately -- and perhaps not wisely for political purposes -- raised a point the other day about Hillary Clinton’s health, based on the "traumatic brain injury" she suffered in 2012, he was technically on solid ground. What wasn’t so solid was the over-reaction by media outlets to Rove’s rather unchivalrous suggestion. To see the difference between the “pile on Rove” mentality and actual, balanced coverage, consider how CNN rushed to paint Rove as evil, compared to how Washington Post blogger Chris Cillizza put the issue in broader perspective.