Critics gave former Vice President Al Gore grief for predicting in An Inconvenient Truth that major cities including lower Manhattan would be underwater if severe ice melt occurred. Now Gore is rewriting history to claim his prediction came true in order to promote his upcoming film, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, which debuted at Sundance on Jan. 19.

In this case, context is the difference between honesty and self-interested revisionism.



Andrew Ross Sorkin is considered a financial guru - a savant of all things business.  So how is he so very, very wrong about government teat specialist Elon Musk?: “Donald Trump: Please think about calling Elon Musk….Mr. Musk…(is) the real-life Tony Stark behind Tesla, the electric car company; SolarCity, the solar power provider; and SpaceX, the rocket company….”

Actually, Elon Musk isn’t the Tony Stark of anything.  And the only person behind Tesla and Solar City is a government bureaucrat - writing Musk yet another government check.



It isn’t just the news media censoring viewpoints on climate change anymore. According to a WikiLeaks email, the left-wing website Think Progress took responsibility for getting a professor ousted from writing at Nate Silver’s 538 blog. The professor diverged from Think Progress’ climate alarmist views by challenging claims that global warming causes more extreme weather.

 


While safety is typically one’s top concern when facing a natural disaster, apparently partisan politics should be more important, to ABC. Former Bill Clinton staffer turned news anchor George Stephanopoulos turned a interview with Republican Governor of Florida Rick Scott about Hurricane Matthew into an argument for Hillary Friday morning when he badgered Scott to let Florida voters continue registering beyond the deadline, because of the hurricane.



The Hillary Clinton campaign was caught in a rather humiliating blunder Thursday, as it was discovered that they bought air time on the Weather Channel in battleground states effected by Hurricane Matthew. Out of the only two networks to cover politics that evening only CBS had mentioned it, while ABC ignored it. “Clinton’s camp had to sidestep an embarrassment of its own. Reversing a recent move to increase campaign ads on the Weather Channel,” reported Major Garrett on CBS Evening News



On the heels of my Drudge Report-linked post about NBC’s Ron Allen informing MSNBC on Wednesday that the Paris climate change deal “is designed to stop” weather events like Hurricane Matthew, Thursday’s PBS NewsHour joined ranks of the absurdity as Judy Woodruff and guest Gavin Schmidt from NASA pondered the “interconnection” between the two.



On Tuesday’s NBC Today, Al Roker used an 8 a.m. ET hour weather report to mount his climate change soapbox and issue a dire warning to viewers: “Well, it has been a really hot year and it just continues. 15 consecutive months of record warmth, global temperatures....But look what happens if we project out to 2050, look at how much further you start to see that deep red of 50-plus days above 100.”



In a CNN interview on Friday, former three-term U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, a Democrat, thanked Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for visiting the flood-ravaged Bayou State. Then, addressing the absence to that point of President Barack Obama and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, she said, "I hope Secretary Clinton will make her way down. I hope President Obama will make a visit" — which is as close as a fellow Democrat can possibly get to saying what's really on their mind, which is "Where in the heck are you guys?"

Those who have noticed it have decribed Landrieu's gratitude to Trump combined with her de facto callout of Obama and Clinton a "rare moment." It should surprise no one, though such behavior continues to deeply disappoint, that based on relevant searches neither Landrieu's statements nor any allusion to them have appeared at the two main national sites of the Associated Press or at the New York Times.



It took former President Bush 5 days to visit Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina hit and the media would never let him off the hook for it, even calling it a “stain” he could “never recover from.” It’s been a week since devastating flooding hit many parts of the same state, destroying thousands of homes and killing 13 people but President Obama still has not stopped golfing in Martha’s Vineyard to visit. While none of the networks last night acknowledged the backlash Obama was facing, both ABC and CBS brought up the criticism this morning but took every chance to downplay the President’s role and defend his choice not to come to Louisiana’s aid.



Thursday morning, CNN’s Kate Bolduan brought on a local Louisiana journalist to discuss his paper’s editorial calling for President Obama to stop his vacation and address the devastating flood which has killed 13 people and been called “the worst disaster since Hurricane Sandy” by the Red Cross. The journalist, Peter Kovacs, editor for The Advocate, Louisiana's largest daily newspaper, compared Obama’s behavior to Bush’s after Katrina and said Obama needed to remember that being President was a “24/7 job,” vacation or not.



The Democratic National Convention would not be complete without a group of liberal Hollywood celebrities anxiously warning that humans are threatening the planet. Avatar director and eco-hypocrite James Cameron premiered his short environmental film, Not Reality TV, at the convention. In addition to blaming floods, droughts, fires, and other natural disasters on human-induced global warming, the film also criticized Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for calling global warming a “hoax.”



Wednesday's CBS Evening News used the recent heat wave in the United States to hype climate change. Mireya Villarreal featured a meteorologist who contended that "this is such a massive problem — and even if we were to completely stop all carbon emissions right now, we would still have a very serious situation. We've passed the tipping point." Villarreal underlined that "2016 is the hottest year ever recorded," and that "this season, fires are more intense; drought conditions are growing; and the arctic sea ice is melting sooner."